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ironduke
06-09-2005, 15:09
Right simple enough i love history i can't get enough of it.
My favourite era is simple. You can tell by my username and my avatar (and if you can't then you don't belong in this thread :mad: .......lol just kidding )


Its the Napoleonic era of course i love Sharpe the books, the series and i love the warfare from this era. Lines of muskets advancing, the cannons with grapeshot and the cavalry.

So whats your favourite point in history and why?

And you can be as patriotic as you want no matter your nationality. ;)

Luke
06-09-2005, 15:16
i love the whole idea about prehistoric britain and the huge forest that prety much covered 99.9% of the country, just imagine, living your entire life only seeing abuot 30 people!

damn, i would love to see what all that was like.

salty
06-09-2005, 15:18
Two periods: 1, from the start to the finish of the 100 Years War (damn you Henry, why did you have to die! We could have conquered France!), and 2, from the end of the American Revolution to the end of the Boer War (British Imperialism).

Like you, I love history too, although I prefer the naval elements and read Alexander Kent's books on Richard Bolitho.

Salty :)

vforvenator
06-09-2005, 15:19
The 1740s onwards. Dashwood? Monks of Medenhem? The Hellfire Club?
All went down hill from there...:evilgrin:
V.

hairyman
06-09-2005, 15:20
I'd have to go for the Angevin empire, and the rest of the 12c in Europe.

Knights, kings, princesses, murder, intrigue, war, swords, nation building, Henry II, crusades and popes. It's got the lot.

Behind that would have to be the end of the eight century and the first half of the ninth century. Vikings, anglo saxons, the birth of France and Germany, Carolingian Europe, and an absence of decent sources beyond christian annals that means there's still a lot of room for imagination and argument.

History got boring when gunpowder was invented. ;)

Strikerkc
06-09-2005, 15:21
I'm a WWII guy myself. Short of that I'm partial to the ancient medeteranian.

salty
06-09-2005, 15:22
@Hairyman: I thought you were into Ottomans :rolleyes:

They didn't start their expansion until near the end of the 100 Years War.

Salty :)

The pestilent 1
06-09-2005, 15:27
Prehistory.
Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceus specifcly.
to me, anything that has happened in the last two thousand years is boring.
the petty machinitions of humanity in this day and age pretty much boil down to "jesus/allah/vishnu/bob dylon/etc made me do it" (a broad generalisation i know so forgive me my petty hates)
there are exceptions to this ofcourse, the Mayans i find genuinly interesting, having forseen their own demise but still welcoming it openly.

before that we have interesting religions, with a broad array of fallible beings.
Setekh for example.
often hailed as a dark god who killed his brother, Osiris to gain the throne of egypt.
sure okay.
but considering his brother had just slpet with his wife (Nepthys)a union that resulted in the Child Anubis, you can understand he was a bit pissed, no?
still, he then went on to do some pretty weird things to Osiris legitimate heir (Horus) so he might have just been a total nutter.

but the legend goes on to tell of how Re was unwilling to let Horus take the throne because, while Horus may be a legitimate heir, Setekhs power was paramount, being the only being in existance who could oppose Apophis.
and given his rather weird temper, you can understand Re's predicament.
give Setekh the throne and **** Osiris off, with his legions of undeath and power over the fertility of the land.
or. irritate Setekh. the only one who could stand agains Apophis, the greatest evil in the universe.

see. fallible, interesting.

ironduke
06-09-2005, 15:31
Yes incest seemed to be rife in most histroic cultures mythology

salty
06-09-2005, 15:31
Yeah, the Egyptians are cool, but at the end of the day, I'd much rather have tales of Nelson and a fleet of Royal Navy sailing Warships (not the crappy aircraft carriers we get today, REAL ships). Honour, great quotes, scandal, political intrigue, war, victory, unorthodoxy... you could make a decent movie out of that.

Salty :)

Wraith
06-09-2005, 15:33
Pre history, specifically Britain but yeah I'll take a look around some other locations too.


i love the whole idea about prehistoric britain and the huge forest that prety much covered 99.9% of the country, just imagine, living your entire life only seeing abuot 30 people!

damn, i would love to see what all that was like.

Agreed -- I'd love to explore that world. Just think it'd still have wolves, and bears, and wild bores too.

I'd like to see what the natives culture and spiritualities were like too, before the spread of Christianity.

x-esiv-4c
06-09-2005, 15:36
That whole Pangia era, where all the land on earth was one giant blob. Good times.

Gaebriel
06-09-2005, 15:42
Ancient Rome, republican time.

ironduke
06-09-2005, 15:43
Yeah, the Egyptians are cool, but at the end of the day, I'd much rather have tales of Nelson and a fleet of Royal Navy sailing Warships (not the crappy aircraft carriers we get today, REAL ships). Honour, great quotes, scandal, political intrigue, war, victory, unorthodoxy... you could make a decent movie out of that.

Salty :)


Good man Salty, theres nothing like sheer tenacity in the face of overwhelming odds.
Admiral Nelson I salute you.

Yodhrin
06-09-2005, 16:39
Good man Salty, theres nothing like sheer tenacity in the face of overwhelming odds.
Admiral Nelson I salute you.

The Napoleonic Era is, for me, the defining period of British history, and my favourite of all historical eras. World War 1 gets an honourable mention though.

It's odd, Im a raving Liberal, I hate the futility of war, but it facinates me at the same time. The statement "War is Hell" is spot on, but it does seem to bring out the best traits of humanity, even though it also sometimes brings out the worst.

Stories of the almost insane bravery displayed by soldiers just gets me. For example, during WW1, a raiding party fell afoul of a German machinegun post, and the officer in charge was badly wounded. He ordered his men to leave him behind, which they did. When they got back to the British trenches and made a report, the commander of the area sent a message back ordering a man to head back to search for the officer immediately. He forgot to add the standard qualifier "after dark". Regardless, the soldier went over the top, and went out searching in broad daylight for his wounded commander, found him dead, and crawled a quarter-mile back to his own trenches under fire.

The other one is the stories of the Scottish regiments marching relentlessly into the teeth of the German lines to the sound of the regimental pipers.

Wisdom
06-09-2005, 17:23
I love pretty much the whole of the medieval period, Manzikert to constantinople or whichever battles you use to split the period. But then again I love many periods, probably why I decided to become a history student. Suppose my specific favourite subject would be the crusades from the First to the fall of Acre.

Wez
06-09-2005, 17:28
The era before recorded history, for the aforementioned reasons.

-Wez

simonr1978
06-09-2005, 17:34
World War Two.

So much changed so quickly, the demise (Pretty much) of the Battleship, the ascendency of the Aircraft Carrier, huge changes in doctrine for airpower and armour, practically every nation started the war with biplane fighters in service, by the end there were aircraft capable almost of supersonic flight (in a dive admittedly, but nevertheless...)

A time of great change, and not to forget great sacrifice.

Inquisitor Engel
06-09-2005, 17:40
What era I'd like to live in?

Rome. Good Rome, preferably somewhere around the time of Caesar Vespasian or Marcus Aurielius. Although I'd much prefer to be a Senator at the time. Or a regional governor, preferably of Gaul.

My favourite era?

The age of Imperialism. 1830 to 1910. Yes, those would would be the great years, when Britain was the greatest super-power on the planet... Yes.

Adlan
06-09-2005, 17:51
From the reign of Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus (Edward the 1st Hammer of the Scots) to the End of the Hundred Years war. The Reign of the Longbow.
As a Historical renactor, and a yeoman, I just love that area of history The Longbow, tested by destroying the Scottish Schiltrons with Northern Welsh Archers and then the universal adoption of the longbow and the destruction of The Flower of French Nobility in the hundred years war. I've made several longbows and They are without doubt the finest peice of medival mechanics ever. Even if using it warps my bones.

And then theres the napolionics, Speaking the same accent as nelson, and drinking at the nelson, occasionally. I Love the whole Domination of the seas by the british navy. And the Gah
Can't exspress my love for napolionics and Longbows enough.

vforvenator
06-09-2005, 18:02
See custom title.

Griefbringer
06-09-2005, 18:09
I am biggily into late medieval/renessaince period myself.

Shadowheart
06-09-2005, 18:14
At the moment I'm into the Thirty Years War, having started to read up on it after reading Moorcock's The Warhound and the World's Pain (one of the Von Bek novels). I became intrigued by the description of this relatively obscure period in history, especially the recurring mentions of Magdeburg. It's not the easiest piece of history to figure out, and in the end it doesn't appear to add up to much, but the sheer horror of it all is fascinating.
Plus it ties in to the founding of the Dutch republic and the Golden Age of Dutch art, so that adds a bit of interest for me.

I'm also partial to pre-history in general, just trying to imagine how people lived back when flintknapping was an essential skill, and before monotheism became the standard. Of course our picture of these times is very vague, but just the feeling of this vast expanse of human history that's virtually forgotten is fascinating.

salty
06-09-2005, 18:18
The Thirty Years War was one of shifting political alliances, and odd match-ups. Catholic France fighting the Protestant cause for example.

As for the longbow, undoubtedly a work of art. If Wellington had had longbowmen rather than musketeers then he would have defeated Napoleon's army half as wuickly as he did. However, it takes a life's training to be able to properly fire one (or so I am told) which is why muskets were far common; anyone could use them

Salty :)

Gethalorre
06-09-2005, 18:23
Ancient Greece/Renaissance...

Pokpoko
06-09-2005, 18:28
well, my favourite era is probably the XVI-XVII century, and napoleonic wars,as they were the last moments of cavalry's glory. With battles like Vienna, Kircholm,taking of Somosierra ravine,or even the engagements of the American Civil War. After napoleon there was only one war in which cavalry played significant part, namely 1920 Bolshevik-Polish war.
apart from that , the South/Middle american pre-columb history is also intresting.

Cade
06-09-2005, 18:37
The Napoleonic Era is so full of all kind of good things.....wars everywhere, countries being born and destroyed all over the place....rapid advances in technology......officers and gentlemen commanding armies of ruffians to glory....

Those were the days.

Wisdom
06-09-2005, 18:57
The Russo-Polish war is a really interesting part of history but there is little published in english on the subject. White Eagle Red Star by Norman Davies, I think, is a good book. There was such a mix of old and new. They had examples of the newest inovations (tanks, armoured cars, planes) but didn't have the resources to equip there forces with them en masse. Both sides were hotch potch in weapons and uniforms. The Poles had their uniforms from the Central Powers and Tsarist armies along with new polish uniforms. Some regiments of uhlans even had napoleonic style uniforms (think from Austro hungarian army). There were evenunits of peasants armed with scythes. The war's interesting also for its effects. If Pilsudski had not stopped the Soviets at Warsaw we would have seen a soviet union that stretched to include Germany at the least. It doesn't get the attention it deserves

Heres a good site
http://www.electronicmuseum.ca/Soviet-Polish-War/spw.html

Crazy Harborc
06-09-2005, 19:27
The period of history I "might" be tempted to become part of............the movie's generated version of the age of Camelot, of Arthur and his knights.

As far as reality.......the period from 1898 until oh, 1913. Either in the UK or the USA.

Now as far as where I want to live my life...........I am in it and have been since 1944 :)

Thud
06-09-2005, 19:33
2500 AD.

Everything up to now has sucked so I figure it's gonna keep on sucking for about five hundred more years or so before someone convinces everyone to stop being total ********s.

Actually, the thirties in the States would sound like something for me. I'd make a killer wise guy. And if that didn't work out, I'd just tiddle-taddle over to Spain and kill me a fascist or two.

And then I've always had a macabre fascination on WWII. A bunch of weird German guys in lack and leather riding about Europe in their brand new shiny cars.

Compyraptor
06-09-2005, 19:35
I love history. It has been and always will be my favourite subject. But the areas I love the most are the following:

Prehistoric Britain up until Hastings. There's just something about that era that I love. The forests, the magic, the myths and nature and humans living side by side in harmony.

Tudor England. I don't know why I like this period. It's probably because when I was learning about this in school they was my first real history lessons. So my love of history comes from these lessons.

Napoleonics and the entire 19th Century (the Age of Empires). This is a recent development after discovering Sharpe. I simply adore this age. The honour, the wars, our Empire and my nation kicking butt and ruling the waves. Hell yeah baby.

Kohhna
06-09-2005, 20:09
The Fin de seicle, 1870s-1930s. An age of Anarchy and revolution, old fashioned war and naked Imperialism, the young Proletarian class finding its own strength. Underclass - mass emigration within and out of europe, political ideologies being articulated for the first time, Victor Serge, Trotsky, Luxembourg, Bakunin, Chen Dixui, James Connolly, Micheal Colins, Klara Zetkin, Vera Zasulich.

The General Strike - Irish Revolution - Russian Revolution - all the failed but glorius post war revolutions in europe - what's not to like?

Edit- oh yes and the Art, literature, music, the beginings of modern intellectual culture, modernism, surrealism, impressionism, futurism, the early cinema - Eisenstein, Joyce, Zola, Picasso, Deigo Rivera, WB Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Dziga Vertov, Gabriel D'annuzio, the economist Villifredo Pareto, Marx, Engles, Antonio Gramsci, Walter Benjamin, Bertholt Brecht, HG Wells.

All that potential, and to think how much of it went in the fires of WW2, in the gas chambers, the Gulags.

Piku
06-09-2005, 20:18
Not exactly a historical period, but I'm into the Beat era right now.
Combination of Tom Wolfe and HST (As documentors).

The Tudors had some good clothes.

Shinobi
06-09-2005, 20:26
Romans, hands down.

They were the first super power. They rock(ed) ^_^

Easy E
06-09-2005, 20:47
I am interested in Ancient Greece, especially the Pelopennesian War and pre-Alexander.

I also find WW1 to be nearly a forgotten war, and I have done a lot of research of Pre-war Europe. I would argue that WW1 was the most influential event in the 20th century!

I hate American History and I'm American!

Sgt John Keel
06-09-2005, 21:04
What era I'd like to live in?
Rome. Good Rome, preferably somewhere around the time of Caesar Vespasian or Marcus Aurielius.


Same here, but rather during the reign of Traianus or Hadrianus*.

Though it's a hard time deciding between Imperial Rome and Republican Rome. Republican Rome seems more moral and non-corrupted, but at the same time, it would be cool to live in the time where Rome was the greatest.

*Well, he is my namesake.

/Adrian

Kohhna
06-09-2005, 23:01
In terms of Historical study, I quite liked doing Medieval Ireland, though I was lucky enough to have the lovely Marie Thereas Flanaghan and the brilliant Bruce Campbell (no, not the Bruce Campbell from the Evil Dead) for my tutors in that area.

Lord Balor
06-09-2005, 23:29
I love all of history but the middle->High middle ages does it for Balor, so around the 700-1200 AD, focused in Western Europe. You have the West still living in the Ruins of the Roman Empire which was succeeded by Germany, Italy is not yet fragmented into weak and volitile city states and the Church acted as the sole unifying power with the ideal of a Latin Christiandom. Starting off with Charlemagne (768-814) and ending off with Pope Urban II's call for a crusade in 1096 are my area's of speciality though. Loved it so much i did history in Uni regardless of the fact it does not have anything to do with my course :D

Kensai X
07-09-2005, 04:23
My favourite era?

The age of Imperialism. 1830 to 1910. Yes, those would would be the great years, when Britain was the greatest super-power on the planet... Yes.


Yeah I like that one too, you the most powerful nation in the entire world...And pretty much got smacked around silly by a bunch of people with sharp sticks... I mean really you guys still wore the red suits until the end of the Boer War in 1900.... Gotta give em credit for fighting in red suit though...

Also during this time period the Scots proved themselves to the Brits that they were more then glorified meatshields and actually accomplished something (Read if the British army did it, a scotch regiment probably did it...)

But hey don't feel bad everyone makes bad choices...

Rome once ruled most of the known world, then in 1940's Italians get bitchslapped by people with sharp sticks, and they had tanks and planes...

Greece they were once great.... Then well.... Ever hear about how they almost got in a war with Bulgaria over a stray dog....

Hell, I'll even admit America screwed up badly with the Spanish-American War... Our ship blew up because of a boiler malfuntion and we waged war on the cubans because we blamed them...

Also I forget, but I believe there was something called the War of the Whiskers, waged because a King coming back from the Crusaded or something like that wouldn't shave his beard, his wife left him, married some english fellow and then start a 301 long year war....

There was the Pastry War conducted by the French against Mexico and the French got beat awful bad, plus the title of the war explains the reasoning behind... (Trust the French to get in a war about Pastries...)

Ahhh... History it's just so much more interesting if read into it....

Wiseman
07-09-2005, 07:29
i love bismarck germany, when he united the different stats and conquered france in a matter of weeks

hairyman
07-09-2005, 08:20
In terms of Historical study, I quite liked doing Medieval Ireland, though I was lucky enough to have the lovely Marie Thereas Flanaghan and the brilliant Bruce Campbell (no, not the Bruce Campbell from the Evil Dead) for my tutors in that area.

That's something I always wish I done more of when I was at university. I wrote something on Strongbow & Henry II, but never got the chance to really get stuck into Irish history (it seemed incredibly confusing, but pretty fascinating at the same time).

I think I'd like to add feudal Japan during their isolationist period as well. Never ending civil war, unique culture, brutality mixed with beauty, and a sense of tradition and ritual that gets so refined it becomes unbelievable what people used to do.

Kohhna
07-09-2005, 09:47
That's something I always wish I done more of when I was at university. I wrote something on Strongbow & Henry II, but never got the chance to really get stuck into Irish history (it seemed incredibly confusing, but pretty fascinating at the same time).
You're never too late. Unfortunately the best stuff on Medieval Irish history is all in academia, the most of the popular stuff is a load of pseudo-mystical bull ****. The best popular history book on Ireland would probably be the Roy Foster edited Illustrated History from OUP (there is a good chapter in there by Declan Kiberd on the history of Irish literature).

Although the best book on Ireland (even if its just the one region) is Jonathan Bardons History of Ulster. It covers everything from pre-historic through ancient ireland up to near enough the present day.

Wisdom
07-09-2005, 10:11
Also I forget, but I believe there was something called the War of the Whiskers, waged because a King coming back from the Crusaded or something like that wouldn't shave his beard, his wife left him, married some english fellow and then start a 301 long year war....

She was a bit of a slag that one. She was shaggin her uncle when she stopped off at his castle in antioch. King Louis had to have his own wife kidnapped and forcibly sent back to france to save face.

Rik Valdis
07-09-2005, 12:04
I would say that my favourite era of history would be between the Glorious revolution (1688) and the enclosures, which happened over of period of time but I will use the end of the Napoleonic war as good apoint as any. I think this period was the greatest time in english history, the proof that representative government does not necessarily have to be fully democratic. The class system in this country functioned at its best with each class blending into each other, each with their own role in what ewas an increasingly prosperous country, far ahead of its continental neighbours.

This was also the era of the glorious wars against France, from the Wars against the Sun King to the end of Napoleon's domination of the continent. During thuis period it was Britian's influence as a naval and colonial trading power that managed to stop any one continetal power (ie France) from achieving complete domination on the continent.

I would strongly reccomend Arthur Bryant's trilogy on the Napoleonic wars, Years of Endurance, Years of Victory and Age of Elegance, if you can find them anywhere, they are (I believe) long out of print, but still excellent books, as are Niall Ferguson's Empire and Frank McLynn's 1759.

I realise that this is a nationalistic and possibly slight idealistic view of the past, but it basically correct.

hairyman
07-09-2005, 13:04
Although the best book on Ireland (even if its just the one region) is Jonathan Bardons History of Ulster. It covers everything from pre-historic through ancient ireland up to near enough the present day.

Cool, I might look that up, actually. Cheers. :)

Spent a lot of time reading Irish mythology & legends, and would be interested to see a historical version of all the cycles of invasions & stuff. Know a little bit about it, but nowhere near enough.

Kohhna
07-09-2005, 14:18
The Myths and Legends are great, they are based on the stories that were written by the hereditary Bardic class about 7-900 years after they were set. The actual characters they were based on are now lost to the ages, Cu-Cuhuailain (pronounced koo hullan, the best known of the legendary heros) was probably enteirely fictional. Queen Medb (Maive) was probably based on a ceremonial character rather than a person.

The Tain Bo Cuilagne (Cattle raid of Cooley) is still quite readable today, there have been a few good translations of the different versions (Thomas Kinsella's is fairly accessable if a bit out-dated).

Tormentor of Slaanesh
07-09-2005, 20:15
greek wars, spartans and athenians. the whole pass of thermopolye, yes i know that's persian invasion, is pretty ace.

Chuffy
07-09-2005, 20:18
Ancients/Classical myself.

Ah yes. The days when armies were big, empires were empires and generals were generals.

The rise of Rome, the Punic Wars, the wars of the Diadochi; all good.

Inquisitor Maul
07-09-2005, 20:29
The 17:th century. When we Swedes were a feared Superpower that managed to kick the combined asses of Denmark, Poland (some other name back then) and Russia :evilgrin:

Though, we eventualy lost in russia

Pokpoko
07-09-2005, 21:33
Poland was named Commonwealth of Both Nations(Poland and Lithuania),however
you seem to forget that you didn't quite "kick ass" in poland.should i bring out the Victory at Kircholm,perhaps,when 3.000 polish(and Lithuanian,but it was the same at that time) cavalrymen(+1.300 infantry and 5 cannons) routed 10.700 elite infantry with minimal losses(some 100 dead and 200 wounded,with Swedes losing 6.000)
The 1617-1629 war cannot be also counted as an overwhelming victory,since both sides resorted to harrasment and skirmishes rather than open battles.Of course GARS did kick our ass few times back then,but it's hardly disgrace to be beaten by one of the best strategists of modern times.if it wasn't for our parliment's ineptness,and willing to pay for the peace the war would go on even longer.
(It is said that it was the efectivness of Polish Cavalry that made Gustavus Adolphus reconsider the usage of cavalry and actually brought back cavlary charges into the Western tactics).
Or maybe the rather shameful inability to take a certain monastery with vastly superior army,which lead to general uprising that turned your victory into a military defeat,even with Kossacks and Siedmiogrod attacking from south and east. it was however a disater for poland since the war destroyed our economics.

Mucusaur
07-09-2005, 22:27
Vietnam. The drugs, the hardware, the draft, the VC, the politics and the general weirdness of it all. Amazing mess really.

VanDoo
08-09-2005, 01:09
Ancient Greece and Alexander, the Pax Romana: Ah! When men of honour, militari , saw it as their sacred duty to defend the realm, instead of leaving it to the soldate because it became a burden.

Also, the whole Napoleonic wars, the Pax Britannica and the Big Three (the war of 1870, WW1, WW2), which are all related, are all interesting.

hairyman
08-09-2005, 08:53
The Myths and Legends are great, they are based on the stories that were written by the hereditary Bardic class about 7-900 years after they were set. The actual characters they were based on are now lost to the ages, Cu-Cuhuailain (pronounced koo hullan, the best known of the legendary heros) was probably enteirely fictional. Queen Medb (Maive) was probably based on a ceremonial character rather than a person.

The Tain Bo Cuilagne (Cattle raid of Cooley) is still quite readable today, there have been a few good translations of the different versions (Thomas Kinsella's is fairly accessable if a bit out-dated).

Yeah, the Tain Bo Cuilagne is an old favourite.. I remember writing stories in English lessons about large Irishmen riding round in chariots chopping people's heads off when I was back in school... my best mate and I were sold on Cu-Cuhuailain.

What I'm really interested in finding out more about are the invasion stories and all the stuff about the Children of Danu. I'm sure the Firbolg (greeks??) and the Fomori and the sons of Nemed (spanish???) and all the rest of them have got some historical grounding, I'm just not sure what. I also love all the stories about Lugh and Nuada and all the rest, and a lot of british myths seem to have their roots in these stories and earlier versions (Tir nan nog (sp?) being a precursor to either Avalon or "fairy"??).

My favourite parts of history are when myth and fact become intertwined, and I love seeing the evolution of mythology and ideas. Someone has previously mentioned ancient egypt on this thread, and they'd be right up there with my favourite periods... if only for the mythology and bizarre pantheon that had such an effect on the classical civillisations that followed.

Delicious Soy
08-09-2005, 12:44
I have a favourite for each period of history:

Ancient - The Persian Wars: Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis, Platea. Battles that defined much of our culture and history as Europeans. The defiance in the face of extreme adversity is simply astounding, the last stand of Leonidas and 1000 other Greeks is one of the great tales of history

Medieval - The Crusades: Another period of legends, great battles and intrigue. I recommend Steven Runcimans A History of the Crusades for an excellently balanced account that takes both Christian, Arab and Orthodox sources. It also provides an insight into the complexities of feudalism and medieval European politics.

Modern - World War I (Australian): The source of my country's own mythology. From the horrendous assault on Gallipoli to the charge of the Light Horse at Bersheeba to the carnage at Bullecourt, Australia paid a heavy price for fighting for its beliefs but that generation of Australians will forever be immortal in the eyes of their decendants.

lord_blackfang
08-09-2005, 13:23
I don't particularly care about any specific period (but if I had to choose, medieval Japan sounds nice... so orderly), I'd rather time-hop a bit so I could shake hands with some great men like Darwin and Einstein.