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Cpt_NinjaPants
14-11-2007, 20:03
So i'm going to get a 26"-36" HDTV soon, but i have no idea the difference between 720p and 1080I. Anyone willing to explain, or better yet, for video gaming which one is better?


Edit, also what's the difference between LCD, Plamsa, and just HDTV. I've tried Wiki... But big words confuse me easily, or i'm just to lazy to try to understand it.

Aaron
14-11-2007, 22:16
The I stands for Interlace and the P stands for Progressive. The number refers to the number of lines (the vertical resolution) in the image.

Interlaced signals split the picture into two blocks:

1111111
2222222
1111111
2222222
etc.

To save bandwidth, it sends all the 1 lines and then all the 2 lines. It then alternates between the two. This means that it can send more lines but at a lower framerate.

Progressive means it sends an entire picture at once. The resolution is lower but the frame rate is higher.

Thus, interlaced pictures can show more detail but may flicker/look jerky.

Personally, I'd use 720p for gaming and 1080i for video. Some newer (and expensive) TVs support 1080p, giving the best of both worlds.

LCD and plasma are both technologies for producing thin TVs. Plasma TVs are generally bigger than LCD TVs.

HDTV just means that the TV can support one of more of the following: 720p, 1080i and 1080p. You can even get HD CRT TVs, but they're pretty rare.

Cpt_NinjaPants
14-11-2007, 22:33
Huh, since i only sorta understood that.. Anyone got a suggestion for a good tv for gaming. Max price is $550.

Though i know one drawback from LCd and plasma, LCD unless it's at a perfect angle makes parts dark and others unseeable. Then with plasma they have burn in and seem top break at high altitudes...

RomanCommander
15-11-2007, 01:17
Aaron got it right. The best test is just try both and see which one you like better.

Inquisitor Engel
15-11-2007, 05:22
You will not see a difference in picture at that picture size or that price point.

Also, you're looking at an LCD, plasmas do not come that small and if you're lucky enough to find an HD tube, it's probably going to weigh in excess of 150 pounds.

ALL current generation of that size (9th gen panels) LCD's are native 720p, but are also capable of displaying a 1080i picture, they do so by scaling the image to fit the number of pixels they have (1366x768 or 1280x720).

In essence, a 1080i picture is only displaying 540 new lines of information at once, a 720p set is displaying roughly 1.5 times the information at any one time so works better for things like video games or sports or any sort of action movie.

If you see a 1080i set in the 26-32" Range DO NO BUY IT. It is at least 2 years old and contains technology you don't want.

My personal recommendations are the Westinghouse or LG's if you can find them on sale. We're coming up to the holidays. If you're not familiar with a brand, ask a sales associate who makes their panel. If they don't give you an answer in 3 seconds, they're lying and don't know.

All that said, the majority of HD broadcasts in the US (and overseas, from what I gather) are native 1080i, so if you can find an HD tube (which will almost always be 1080i) you'll get a crisper picture than otherwise because it doesn't have to scale it.





As an aside, another advantage to a 1080p set is that it only has to deinterlace, not scale, 1080i images, producing a much nicer picture close-up than most 720p sets.

Any further questions, just ask. ;)

Dengar
15-11-2007, 19:07
Take a look at a few and see what you like ask the guys in store for the details if they are angood at their job they should be able to give you all the info you need.

starlight
15-11-2007, 19:25
Try several stores as not everyone sets up their displays the same. Get a feel for which picture you *like*, rather than which has the flashiest specs. At the end of the day, all that matters is that you get the best picture *FOR YOU* at the price you want to pay.

Sgt John Keel
15-11-2007, 21:20
Try several stores as not everyone sets up their displays the same. Get a feel for which picture you *like*, rather than which has the flashiest specs. At the end of the day, all that matters is that you get the best picture *FOR YOU* at the price you want to pay.

The most enjoying thing is paying a little more than you really want for something which is a huge upgrade from that you could really afford.

Anyway, Engle is right, but I would prefer a Samsung or a Sony. Brand name **** and all… Have heard a lot of satisfied Westinghouse customers.

/Adrian

Inquisitor Engel
15-11-2007, 21:48
Anyway, Engle is right, but I would prefer a Samsung or a Sony. Brand name **** and all… Have heard a lot of satisfied Westinghouse customers.

The thing you have to remember about Westinghouse is that their TV division is really an offshoot of their monitor company, where contrast and black levels aren't as important as they on TV's. You'll notice their larger TV's look like crap, even compared to other cheaper sets.

Their smaller ones are much better because the difference in contrast isn't as noticable, but there are better 32's.

A little bit above the target price-range is the Sony KDL-32M3000 (and the 36M3000 might come in close) which is an excellent set.

talos935
15-11-2007, 23:26
Also remember when looking at sets in store that alot of them [in the UK anyway] dont actually bother setting the contrast/colour right, so the image isn't always at it's best

ryfitz13
16-11-2007, 13:10
All that said, the majority of HD broadcasts in the US (and overseas, from what I gather) are native 1080i, so if you can find an HD tube (which will almost always be 1080i) you'll get a crisper picture than otherwise because it doesn't have to scale it.


Quick note - as someone who works for one of the biggest HD networks in the US, I can tell you that the vast majority of braodcasts are still 720p. Very few networks have studios that are yet capable of 1080p/i...

This doesn't prevent Dish, DiretcTV, or your digital cable company from "upconverting" the signal to 1080p/i, but most US HD programming is still generated in 720p.

Inquisitor Engel
16-11-2007, 23:06
Quick note - as someone who works for one of the biggest HD networks in the US, I can tell you that the vast majority of braodcasts are still 720p. Very few networks have studios that are yet capable of 1080p/i...

This doesn't prevent Dish, DiretcTV, or your digital cable company from "upconverting" the signal to 1080p/i, but most US HD programming is still generated in 720p.

Not disagreeing with you, but 1080i is half the signal 1080p is, and was around first.

Anything I pull off OTA in this area comes in at 1080i native, same with Dallas. The reasoning behind Hitachi's 1080i native plasmas was that all but a couple of national broadcasters were native 1080i, but yeah I agree, Dish puts some stuff out in 1080i that I know are normally 720p. My main thrust was that for whatever source he has, chances are it'll be coming down the pipe at 1080i.

Again, I may be wrong, I'm all about the end-user part of it anyway - how it gets there isn't so much my concern as how it's displayed. ;) That said, PM me if you get a chance.