PDA

View Full Version : The Gardening-thread



Badgobbla
14-09-2005, 10:49
Well,
Iíve been thinking quite a bit to start a thread about this and I donít know if anyone in hereís interested in gardening as much as I am. I must say itís really relaxing to let yourself go once in a while and take it all out on those damn plants who try to live in between my expensive flowers.

On to the serious parts: summerís almost gone here and Iím thinking of getting some flowers who can withstand the winter-period. Anyone got some advice as to how I would tackle this problem? Also, I really like big flowers , so thereís no need to talk about little flowers (unless theyíre really cute).

Why start a thread about this I hear you ask? Well, apart from getting my kicks from painting/converting miniís, Iím into putting my fingers in the dirt to make something grow into a thing of beauty. If someone else has something to share about this subject feel free to discuss.

Griefbringer
14-09-2005, 11:41
Hey, I like garden-tending, though I am not particularly keen on flowers myself - more interested in edible plants, bushes, trees and rocks.

As for hints about flowers able to withstand winter, it is hard to give advice since I am not aware about the harshness of winters in Pantless.

Adept
14-09-2005, 11:50
I have two Bonsai trees. They are both Junipers.

Badgobbla
14-09-2005, 11:58
Bonsai trees are too small for me. I really like flowers with big, shiny petals and it gives a real satisfaction to see them grow after I put them in the ground.

ithiltaen
14-09-2005, 11:59
I quite like trees myself. I have a small garden, so I can't have a lot of trees in the same place (maybe a couple of little ones, but not a really big one). That pisses me off big time, because I love enormous trees!

I have two olives at the moment. They don't grow really fast, so when I bought them they were like 50 years old. They are great because I don't have to give them water, they are used to dry conditions.

The boyz
14-09-2005, 13:11
I quite enjoy gardening, well the growing of vegetables side of it. I generally grow potatoes, spinach, runner beans and onions and any other vegetables that takes my fancy. Although this year my vegetable plot has goe to pot and is currentley all over grown and all the boarders need repairing so I have my work cut out for me soon, to get the plots ready for next year.

I have always fancied getting a couple of Bonsai trees but never had. I think they would go well in my room.

McMullet
14-09-2005, 13:14
My Dad has 30 trees of various types in our garden (field) at home. Some of them are getting to be up to 10m tall or so.

I have a few pot plants (mainly Cacti and succulents) on my windowsill at home, buit currently no windowsill in my house at uni. All will change soon though, as I am moving house tomorrow. I plan to have some proper-ass plants on my new room.

m1s1n
14-09-2005, 13:28
If I could keep a potted plant alive for longer than two-months I would be content.
Currently I have problems with plants and their demands.
Really someone needs to invent the plant that only needs water when I remember.

lord_blackfang
14-09-2005, 14:22
Iím into putting my fingers in the dirt to make something grow into a thing of beauty.


I really like big flowers , so thereís no need to talk about little flowers (unless theyíre really cute).


there's something really satisfying about eating your own produce

It was, however, a very satisfying feeling when it was finally erected.

The innuendo is killing me.

McMullet
14-09-2005, 14:29
If I could keep a potted plant alive for longer than two-months I would be content.
Currently I have problems with plants and their demands.
Really someone needs to invent the plant that only needs water when I remember.
Get some cacti. I used to water mine a few times a year, and that was all they needed.

Adlan
14-09-2005, 15:20
For surviving winter I'd get daises. wild dasies have been knew to flower on christmasday (in Edinburgh for flips sake!)

So Thats what I'd recommend, A big cultivated variety, but check that it is still hardy.

And as this is a general Gardening thread:

Plant News from Rural Norfolk!
Come into season in season:
Bramble, berries are ripe and now is when to pick the leaves to dry or use fresh for tea.
Wild Plum
Greengage
Sloe.
Still in Season:
wild garlic,
Last of wild water cress
Sampher
Potatoes in the earth should last all year.

Jedi152
14-09-2005, 15:33
I'd like to grow fruit, there's something really satisfying about eating your own produce - but since we rent we can't plant anything.

I'd like to grow some sloes or damsons, so i can make Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's fruit-flavoured vodka!

Thud
14-09-2005, 15:57
I love gardening. Personally I find it both very stimulating and rewarding.

I wouldn't say that I have come beyond the hobby-level, but I do try to get some digging done once or twice every weekend. It's funny that this thread should come now, though, because just last week some other boys and I were working on this common area in my neighbourhood. On the lawn we were going to erect a majestic oak tree. I should guess it was around four, four and a half metres tall and, boy, can I tell you it was hard work. It was, however, a very satisfying feeling when it was finally erected.

Other than tress I like working with roses. Perhaps it sounds rather poncy, but you have to admit, they're pretty cool when you get it right. I am not sure about the English name for them (klatreroser in Norwegian) but the kind that "climbs" walls and such, I really like. They really add some feeling to the otherwise boring one-coloured walls.

x-esiv-4c
14-09-2005, 15:59
Nothing quite like tending ones own vegetable patch :)

TitusAndronicus
14-09-2005, 16:19
Well, living in Northern California gave me a huge love for the massive redwood trees. Walking into your backyard at night with mny wife, and seeing a 200 foot tall tree looming over us was quite impressive. I truly miss lying on my back and looking up at a massive redwood loomng against a big yellow moon.
Of course, now that we're in LA, and there's mostly sand here, I have taken to growing plants that don't need as much water. I find ferns do well in shady areas such as I have at my apartment building, and someone found a big weird plant in the trash that we grow at the pool. I don't kow what the heck it is, but it consists of three foot long stems with a strange little flower looking bud of leaves on end. I'll try to find a picture of it, BG. You'd love it...
I suggest you build yourself and indoor hothouse, where you can grow violets and other sultry, soft flowering plants.
Or you could plant things tha are hardy and will withstand rough treatment.

Brother Frog
14-09-2005, 16:25
I'm not much of a gardener (that I leave to mum), mainly doing little more than mowing the lawn and maintainance.

Something I would suggest though, is get some tropical fish. The waste water you have to change every week is loaded with nitrates, nitrites and other plant goodies. Works wonders on our flowers.

Adlan
14-09-2005, 16:32
I really admire Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, mainly becuase he revived intrest in my traditional way of life, But many people try downsizing and make a hash of it. Thinking grand schemes and planting things in the wrong conditions.

But Jedi get on your bike, cycle some quite country lanes and look for somthing with these (http://www.landshapes.org/learning/images/sloe.jpg) leaves.
Good old black thorn, ( had a black thorn winter this year).
Though they may not be quite ripe yet in your area.

Many hedges are black thorn, and scouting my local area I notice 3 things that are also in season.
Oak, collect acorns for acorn flour (makes good pancakes)
Walnut, still plenty green on the tree but the first ripe are falling
and Hawthorn, an aquire taste but plentiful and flavour some.

Griefbringer
14-09-2005, 17:58
I'd like to grow fruit, there's something really satisfying about eating your own produce - but since we rent we can't plant anything.


Warning about fruit trees - it takes a really long time until they get large enough to bear fruit (though depends a bit on the climate). For quicker crops, I would recommend berry-bearing bushes - if planted on a good soil, they should start bearing fruit within a couple of years.

For those who like it, rhubarb can also be a good choice - planted on a good soil in autumn and watered sufficiently, it can be giving good crops on the second summer from planting. Just don't be greedy with it - always leave in enough leaves to keep it growing.

For those with more limited area, I would recommend growing some herbs and spices, such as basil and barsley - freshly picked they are the tastiest!

Adlan
15-09-2005, 06:34
Be ware when planting some herbs and spices, they can be very difficult to remove if they spread where you don't want them. and though tasty can become weeds if not controlled.

Satan Dingo 420
15-09-2005, 06:40
The flowers I tend to be most interested in tend to come to me dried, packaged and costing around $300.00 an ounce.

But I have tried my hand at guerilla gardening, to variable degrees of success.

Badgobbla
15-09-2005, 06:44
I see your point TA and all I can say is this: I live in quite a densely populated area, but we still have some green patches here and there. So, in the weekends I take long walks in those little 'forests' (they're not big enough to be called forests) and marvel at the wonders that nature has created. Being a part of that and creating my own plants is a wonder in itself.

TitusAndronicus
15-09-2005, 07:52
Then, there's always wandering through public areas where you can see many strange and delightful shrubberies. I like home depot myself. The wife and I have found many a lonely ahrubbery that needed planting. And there's nothing like grubing amongst the roots and potting soil with your love. I'm surprised Thud hasn't mentioned the aid that chemicals can bring in these exercises. They can make the most reluctant fern explode into great moist fronds and curly tendrils.

Badgobbla
15-09-2005, 08:22
I, for one, am not really for using chemicals when growing my plants. It gives me the idea that I'm not 'natural', if you know what I mean.

This should be the way of things: if I stick a seed in the ground I want to watch it grow without the use of chemicals.

ithiltaen
15-09-2005, 10:36
You are just old-fashioned. Chemicals work wonders. I've seen trees growing much, much faster, and bigger, thanks to them. You should try next time you plant something. They work even with those big flowers you say you really like.

If I finally go to Belgium this Auttum, I can show you which ones are the best ones, and we can even plant something if you wish.

Adept
15-09-2005, 12:55
I, for one, am not really for using chemicals when growing my plants...

This sentiment, or at least the expression if it, often makes me chuckle. "Chemical free!" Chemical free eh? So what the heck are you using, if not chemicals. Of course bearing in mind that dihydrogen oxide (more commonly called water) is itself, a chemical.

Another noteworthy sentiment: It's all natural, so it must be good for me! Folks, rattlesnake venom is naturally occuring too. So is lightning. Doesn't make either of them good for you.

Griefbringer
15-09-2005, 14:59
I personally tend to go light on the fertilisers, just a bit of wood ash for the minerals. If the soil is good the plants will grow well enough without any extra boost.

I guess I am just too lazy to fool around with any extra fertilisers.

Badgobbla
15-09-2005, 20:10
My point exactly Griefbringer. I know that nowadays everything we eat and drink is 'contaminated', but we're used to it and I feel that it isn't up to us to put more crap in the ground. Let's just plant stuff and let the world get better for it.

Adlan
15-09-2005, 21:42
were it not for artifical chemical fertilisers we would all starve, thanks to the eu banning use of manure as a fertilizer in wide scale conditions (not sure of the exact wording of the law, not arable. Livestock farmer)
But what i would like to see is a world where humans start to leave the cities. where people return to farming, keeping old skills and traditons alive with the befits of new technology. I'd like to see people learn how to get the most out of their land, and not simply massive farms where large scale planting causes a drop in management efficancy. Not only the fact that of soil erosion. I want to see land under the plough again, pastures rich with hay and forests growing up where cities used to be. I want everyone to have their own water supply and fusion generator.

But thats just a personal dream.

Badgobbla
16-09-2005, 06:45
I couldn't agree with you more: now that I'm starting to grow my own crops and (hopefully) will be eating from them soon. I feel that I'm taking a step back. This of course means more time spent in the garden growing and planting things and less time in front of the PC.

Adlan
16-09-2005, 06:57
Well if you get good at it you could become a small holder and live off the land (and goverment subsidies, and benefits)
And then you only work in day light. as soon as it's dark you stop.

ithiltaen
16-09-2005, 10:36
Well if you get good at it you could become a small holder and live off the land (and goverment subsidies, and benefits)
And then you only work in day light. as soon as it's dark you stop.

Maybe I'm just weird, but the time of the day when I enjoy the most planting it's at night. (I have lots of lights in my garden, probably because I usually make parties there)

Adlan
16-09-2005, 10:52
How odd, dosn't seem practical to me. But then the enjoyment i get from growing things is anticipation, and a little bit of pride. rather that any sense of enjoyment from the act of growing.
I actually prefer just foraging wild fruits and hedgrows rather than planting things.

The boyz
16-09-2005, 11:00
I, for one, am not really for using chemicals when growing my plants. It gives me the idea that I'm not 'natural', if you know what I mean.


I tend not to use much in the way of chemicals, well actually I dont use any. Instead of slug pellets I tend to use beer traps. And I have two compost bins which I fill up with Organic matter over winter and then come spring, when I start to plant stuff I just use the compost. Or I use Geese crap. but I was told that can be abit too rich or something so I tend too let that break down for a while into a really fine soil almost before I use it.

Adlan
16-09-2005, 11:15
I tend to make my own mix of compost. Manure with plant debrie and kitchen waste. And plenty of nettles (iron and nitrogen)
And if i leave somthing fallow I plant clover on it. lots of nice nirtates.