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max the dog
06-12-2007, 00:47
Here's a question for my British Warseer friends? What makes the perfect meal of Fish & Chips.

What kind of fish, the perfect beverage to wash it down, the sides to go with it, the seasoning etc... I need to know.

Late this month I've a British friend coming in town (Christmas) and I thought I'd surprise her with a bit of home. She talks endlessly about them, how much she misses them and how impossible to find a good plate of fish and chips in Chicago and on and on about how good they are.
Years ago I was in London, had a plate and had to admit, she right. They are pretty darn good. So I have a good idea of what they're supposed to be like. Now I want to make them, help me out.

m1s1n
06-12-2007, 01:31
When I was over there this summer I noticed that people put salt and vinegar on them.

theunwantedbeing
06-12-2007, 01:39
Salt and vinegar on them.(lots of it, on both the fish and the chips...makes the fish taste much better)
Gravy as well.
Maybe mushy pea's if you like em.
The chips cant be too squishy.

er....
Any chef will most likely die upon seeing "normal" fish and chips.

vforvenator
06-12-2007, 01:55
Its pretty conventional, the usual fish n' chips: salt n' vinegar is the prerequisite staple, plus either ketchup or brown or HP sauce, if you have that in the states - its basically a slightly sweet, sharp and vinegary steak sauce, and its brown, obviously... And yes, mushy peas are also really popular over here, for some reason I still can't get my head around.

Icarus
06-12-2007, 02:01
The Fish is normally something like Cod or Haddock, fried in a layer of batter. Chip shop chips are something special too, you want them nice and chunky, not too soft but fluffy, with a nice film of grease and then cover them with salt and vinegar.

nice thing to do for your friend! i cant imagine a world without chips!

max the dog
06-12-2007, 02:18
What kind of batter for the fish? Is it thin, thick, gritty or smooth in texture?
Should I get Cod or Haddock or will any whitefish do?
The chips, the ones I had looked just like what Americans would call fries but I know that's not exactly right. Aren't they sliced thin?

theunwantedbeing
06-12-2007, 02:31
Much thicker, and generally cooked badly so they end out squishy rather than crunchy.
Thicker crispy chips are fine though.
Any white fish but cod or haddock is the norm.
The batter tends to be quite thick but not gritty.

Icarus
06-12-2007, 02:56
Yeah the batter is thick and crunchy. Mmmm.... now im hungry!

Inquisitor_Matt
06-12-2007, 03:32
When I was in Alaska last summer, we were told that this hole-in-the-wall restaurant had the best fish and chips in city. The had halibut that was fresh and the only way I can describe it is "heavenly". They also had salmon that was dang good, but OMG I really want some now. :cries:

Arkzein
06-12-2007, 04:19
God not "fries" don't know how anyone eats those. You'll get a polite smile at best if putting a plate of them down and an "Aw, thanks for trying". ;)

Good big bit of Cod with a thick, smooth batter. (can be cooked crunchy or soft, most prefer crunchy, love mine soft though) Proper chunky chips (at least a 10mm sq. cross section), better soft these but the vinegar helps with that. Need to get a good fryer as well, somehow the small home deep fat fryers never seem as nice as the large chip shop kind. Lashings of salt and vinegar and have more on the table ready. (Even better if you can get those bottles of chippy vinegar ;)) Sauce is a bit hit and miss, some like red sauce, some HP brown, some none. For me I love the Scottish kind which is a mixture of brown and vinegar I believe. (Normal HP sauce actually makes me gag) Mushy peas, gravy or beans as sides for those that like them too. As for a drink? Anything, fizzy drink is the most common I expect. Had a glass of Rosť with mine last time though. *laughs*

Will have to forgive me for going on, on a strict bulking diet of "good" food and only allow myself a nice trans-fat treat every 2 weeks. Bring on Friday!

Now where is the "How do I make an Ulster fry?" Thread? Give the Scots a run for their money on heart attack territory without slapping batter everything in sight. ;)

*edit* Oh and forget the plate, wrap em in some paper (Newspaper hasn't been done for years though) and give out a white plastic knife and fork that break after two seconds. :D

The Dude
06-12-2007, 04:33
What kind of batter for the fish? Is it thin, thick, gritty or smooth in texture?

Behold! (http://www.abc.net.au/melbourne/stories/s1186370.htm)

Hope this helps ;)

max the dog
06-12-2007, 04:36
Thanks guys, I think I've got it. A couple final question: the fry oil and fish seasonings. Does the oil matter or will any good fry oil do? I know you're not expecting me to just toss in some battered fish without seasoning them up a bit. What would you recommend?

max the dog
06-12-2007, 04:41
Behold! (http://www.abc.net.au/melbourne/stories/s1186370.htm)

Hope this helps ;)

Beer batter! been there and done that. You can't live in the Midwest, own a fishing pole and not know about beer batter. I'm tying to make an authentic dish (paper) of fish and chips the way it's done in London. It's uniquely good and unlike any other battered fish there is.

The Dude
06-12-2007, 05:05
Beer batter! been there and done that. You can't live in the Midwest, own a fishing pole and not know about beer batter. I'm tying to make an authentic dish (paper) of fish and chips the way it's done in London. It's uniquely good and unlike any other battered fish there is.

Well Iím sorry, but the only Battered Fish Iíve ever had used Beer Batter. Of course Iím not a huge fish fan, and so that may have something to do with it.

This (http://www.abc.net.au/westernplains/stories/s1401315.htm)may be of more help then.

Brimstone
06-12-2007, 05:45
Nothing wrong with beer batter, it's used in the UK.

Anyway it's better to cook something you can do well than to experiment and mess it up.

So what else do you need.

1. Fish - Cod or Haddock fillets (Haddock is stronger in taste so if you are unsure if the person likes it, stick to Cod).
2. Mushy peas or baked beans.
3. Tartare sauce / Tomato sauce (Heinz) / Brown Sauce.
4. Salt & Vinegar (maybe pepper as well)
4. Chips (fries) ensure these are English style not American

The wiki article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_and_chips#Accompaniments) is useful.

athamas
06-12-2007, 06:36
also rememeber that some people are not mushy pea/ gravy fans, it is actually dependant more on where you come from that anything else...

Jedi152
06-12-2007, 06:49
Nothing beats fish (haddock for preference), chips, mushy peas, brown sauce (or tartare sauce for the fish), salt, vinegar, bread and butter and a cup of tea in my book.

SV_Harlequin
06-12-2007, 07:16
And of course it all has to be be wrapped in paper.

Typheron
06-12-2007, 08:03
Being Scottish i would recommend that you track down a can or bottle of Irn Bru as a perfect beverage to wash it down.

Additionally dont salt or vingar the chips, allow her to do it instead, having all the stuff near by for her to choose from. I personally quite like only a splash of everything, but a friend of mine likes the chips to be swimming.

Finally, as has been noted true chippy brown sauce is a mixture of vinegar and actual brown sauce, the mixture varies from chip shop to chip shop but locally for me its quite runny and rather good.

Bombot
06-12-2007, 08:09
Proper chips are actually fairly easy to do. Cut the potatoes up into fairly thick chunks and deep fry them (I'm sure the internet can give more specific guidance). My gran used to do them and they were very nice.

The typical fish is cod, but haddock will do nicely too, and is becoming more common as cod is dying out (literally).

TheSonOfAbbadon
06-12-2007, 08:11
pea's

Good heavens, man! Such cold-blooded murder of the English language!

WLBjork
06-12-2007, 08:31
Frying in dripping gives the best flavour to the batter. Of course, it'll make the arteries clang a little more.

DarthSte
06-12-2007, 08:40
There are so many regional variations of how they are cooked. It would help if you said where your friend was from. In Lancashire the chips tend to be cooked in vegetable fat, and in Yorkshire, which has a direct border with Lancs they often use beef fat...

Bombot
06-12-2007, 08:50
It would help if you said where your friend was from.

This is true. Down south gravy is confined to roast dinners thank you very much, and I've never seen anyone actually buy mushy peas.

CaptainSenioris
06-12-2007, 09:02
I definetly agree with all the folk who are saying allow her to choose the side/sauce. If you have all of them she will probably be impressed enough to be happy that you've tried, then pick the one she likes.

Practice cooking it beforehand, there would be nothing more stressful than trying to get it right on the night for the first time. You should also post pics of your first attempt so we may judge your efforts and be hungry.:D

pookie
06-12-2007, 09:28
There are so many regional variations of how they are cooked. It would help if you said where your friend was from. In Lancashire the chips tend to be cooked in vegetable fat, and in Yorkshire, which has a direct border with Lancs they often use beef fat...

QFT - i love my fish n chips but only when im at home in Yorkshire, they are so many variations/likes and dislikes, wether to have peas or not ( around my way a cheap curry is also a option...) etc etc, great your doing it for her, but let us know where she is from and we'll be able to better say.

also i wouldnt choose a cold drink as beverage, it can make the batter/oil on the batter go all erm well 'clacky' ( as the wife says ) and not nice. Id recommened a Good Cuppa tea !

Luke
06-12-2007, 09:36
Hmm, fish and chips....


As said above, get a nice bit of cod or hoki. In fact you will find most chip shops use hoki these days as it is cheaper and less endangered than cod but still tastes the same.
Batter, then deep fry the nuts off it.

Chip your chips then deep fry the nuts off them too. Plenty of salt and vinegar "for taste" but I also go with a bit of pepper on my fish.

I doubt you will be able to replicate the "lived in" taste of the oil that chippies use as it is recycled, hydrogenated oil which has probably been in circulation for at least a month picking up countless flavours along the way.

My old dear changes the oil once every two months. It always tastes better the older it is.

DeathlessDraich
06-12-2007, 10:27
Since no one has mentioned it:

The type of potato really matters - King Edward for me!

Luke
06-12-2007, 10:37
Or Wilja. They are good if you live in the midlands.

Deamon-forge
06-12-2007, 10:41
I like cod with my chips and a big tub of curry saurce *yum* Nothing better than fish and chips covered in salt and vingar

DarthSte
06-12-2007, 10:41
Good old cup of tea as the beverage. Or if you insist on a cold drink - Dandelion and Burdock seems popular in Chippies around here for some reason.

moose
06-12-2007, 11:01
As all the British know, fish and chips are much better in the North - most notably Yorkshire seasides! London ones are overly expensive, the chips always seem to be overcooked, and the batter is way too crunchy too and lack flavour. I'm sure there are nice southern ones, just london centre is a bit crap.

Cods the traditonal fish, if not it'll have to be haddock. Curry sauce is best for chips! Or good old mushy peas! Plenty of salt and vinegar....its nearing lunch time and this isn't helping lol.

A can of pop from the fridge is the traditional drink *thumbs up*

Luke
06-12-2007, 11:18
London does not represent "the south". Dorset, cornwall and devon etc are all well better for fish and chips. Sorry to say but hoki really is replacing your beloved cod but no one really notices the difference and they can still call it "cod" legally.


Here in the midlands we tend to get sub-par fish but amazing potatoes where on the coast it is vice-versa I find.

THE CHIEF
06-12-2007, 11:21
Well since nobody's said it yet - Plaice is a common option in many a chippy too. Also I saw a program a while ago where this chef is in search of perfection in dishes he likes, and goes about achieving this perfection with scientific precision. He even synthesized the perfect chip shop smell and bottled it so he could scent the air as he ate! I can't remember what it's called right now, but if you can track down info of how he went about it you will have one hella good fish and chips.

Shadowseer Crofty
06-12-2007, 11:25
I'd highly recommend curry sauce with the chips, though it does depend on preference, have the option of curry sauce, mushy peas, gravy and baked beans, all the chippies where I come from have those four options, plus tomato sauce, brown sauce, salt and vinegar. Serve in a polystyrene tray wrapped in thick paper, with a can of coca-cola or Dr. Pepper, sat on a wall near a park on a chilly afternoon. Make sure your eating implement is a small, two-pronged wooden fork (There's probably a picture of one of those on the wiki that Brimstone linked) or a small cheap plastic fork.

THE CHIEF
06-12-2007, 11:30
I'd highly recommend curry sauce with the chips, though it does depend on preference, have the option of curry sauce, mushy peas, gravy and baked beans, all the chippies where I come from have those four options, plus tomato sauce, brown sauce, salt and vinegar. Serve in a polystyrene tray wrapped in thick paper, with a can of coca-cola or Dr. Pepper, sat on a wall near a park on a chilly afternoon. Make sure your eating implement is a small, two-pronged wooden fork (There's probably a picture of one of those on the wiki that Brimstone linked) or a small cheap plastic fork.

I second this serving suggestion, minus the curry sauce :p

Salt and vinegar all the way.

Luke
06-12-2007, 11:34
Curry sauce only for when you have only chips. Chip shop curry is acrid and metallic consisting pretty mych, of only sugar, cumin and water lol. But it tastes good and that is what counts :p

Wooden fork ftw! Up our way back when I was younger they didn't have polystyrene trays, they just wrapped the fish and chips up in newspaper or if you had just chips, a paper cone and the vinegar used to drip from the point at the bottom.

Bombot
06-12-2007, 11:37
I think getting a good curry sauce and perfecting the fish and chips is rather ambitious. Stick to the basics!

Minibull
06-12-2007, 11:54
Good big bit of Cod with a thick, smooth batter.

Am I the only one who finds it hilarious that the Warseer site automatically tries to translate the sentence above to read:

"Good big bit of Cities of Death with a thick, smooth batter." :D

Just out of curiosity, when you mention gravy, what are you meaning? Coming from the deep South here in America, gravy consists of the meat drippings (the left over liquid fat) mixed with flour, salt, and a few spices. It usually is served with turkey, chicken, beef, or pork, but I don't remember ever having a fish gravy.

Kohhna
06-12-2007, 11:58
Tip on doing chips Chippie style. Deep fry them for a while on a low heat first to soften them up, a couple of minutes at least. Then take them out and fire up the Oil until its really hot and blitz them for a wee second (i.e. up to but not over a minute) to brown them. This is the least healthy way to cook chips but also the tastiest, and how to get them properly squidgy.

DarthSte
06-12-2007, 12:05
Am I the only one who finds it hilarious that the Warseer site automatically tries to translate the sentence above to read:

"Good big bit of Cities of Death with a thick, smooth batter." :D

Just out of curiosity, when you mention gravy, what are you meaning? Coming from the deep South here in America, gravy consists of the meat drippings (the left over liquid fat) mixed with flour, salt, and a few spices. It usually is served with turkey, chicken, beef, or pork, but I don't remember ever having a fish gravy.

Yes, that is the same gravy that some slightly odd people put on their fish and chips over here. Made from beef juices usually, I think.

Dogma
06-12-2007, 12:19
If you can for the vinegar get Sarsons as there really is no other vinegar.
& as mentioned earlier the most important thing for british fish & chips is make sure the oil has been used plenty of times previously to deep fry various foods. The second most important thing is to have Heinz tomato sauce (Ketchup) as there is nothing worse than nasty tomato sauce.


Good Luck & hope she enjoys it.

pookie
06-12-2007, 12:20
[QUOTE=Luke;2157994]London does not represent "the south". Dorset, cornwall and devon etc are all well better for fish and chips. Sorry to say but hoki really is replacing your beloved cod but no one really notices the difference and they can still call it "cod" legally. [QUOTE]

well its certainly further south than us! lol

Typheron
06-12-2007, 12:28
Am I the only one who finds it hilarious that the Warseer site automatically tries to translate the sentence above to read:

"Good big bit of Cities of Death with a thick, smooth batter." :D

Just out of curiosity, when you mention gravy, what are you meaning? Coming from the deep South here in America, gravy consists of the meat drippings (the left over liquid fat) mixed with flour, salt, and a few spices. It usually is served with turkey, chicken, beef, or pork, but I don't remember ever having a fish gravy.

The gravy is for the chips, and is pritty much the same thing.

Bombot
06-12-2007, 12:32
If you can for the vinegar get Sarsons as there really is no other vinegar.

Balsamic vinegar, whilst ridiculously OTT for fish and chips, does taste very good on them.

Btw, for the OP, a slice of lemon is commonly added for squeezing over the fish.

hairyman
06-12-2007, 12:32
There's more to UK cuisine than fish and chips, you know. We also have:

Battered sausage and chips
Plain sausage and chips
Deep fried burger and chips
Pie and chips
Faggots and chips
Deep fried pizza and chips
Rissole and chips
Chicken and chips
Kebab meat and chips

Shadowseer Crofty
06-12-2007, 12:33
London does not represent "the south". Dorset, cornwall and devon etc are all well better for fish and chips. Sorry to say but hoki really is replacing your beloved cod but no one really notices the difference and they can still call it "cod" legally.

well its certainly further south than us! lol

The best fish and chips are from the north, especially Yorkshire (my home county) and Lincolshire (where I often go on holiday). Especially Grimsby and Cleethorpes.
This thread is making me want proper fish and chips, which I haven't had since came to uni (the nearest chippie is a bit over a mile away in the next village), and even though what the canteen does on a friday is good (similar to the sort served in cafes in Morrisson's), it doesn't compare to the real thing from a chippie

hairyman
06-12-2007, 12:38
The best fish and chips I've ever had are in Whitley Bay, or in Rothsea. You've got to be somewhere on the coast to get proper fresh fish.

Oh, and curry sause ftw. :)

DarthSte
06-12-2007, 12:41
There's more to UK cuisine than fish and chips, you know. We also have:
Faggots and chips
Deep fried pizza and chips

Think the deep fried pizza is a Scottish thing normally. For our cousins in the US - faggots are like meatballs.


The best fish and chips are from the north, especially Yorkshire (my home county) and Lincolshire (where I often go on holiday). Especially Grimsby and Cleethorpes.


I used to live near Grimsby, there was a place just next to the football ground that served awesome fish and chips.
Lived in Colchester, Windsor and Bath (all down south) all had no good chip shops.
Whitby and Scarborough are both very good.

Luke
06-12-2007, 13:06
Nope, the best fish and chips are from the midlands :p

Proper robust potatoes!

BTW, Faggots (real) ftw. Though the little balls of salty meat you get in chippies are insanely adicctive.

El Presedente
06-12-2007, 13:08
Not sure how much has been said, but I have a few points.

1.Leave out the gravy, not everyone likes it on Fish and Chips, I certainly don't and I don't know many others who do, curry sause is used more often but usually the fish and chips remain unsaused, exept for ketchup on the side of course.

2.I don't know many like mushy peasy either.

3. The chips are closer to potato wedges than fries, but not too close.

4.You may want to consider a little something on the side, a scotch egg or pickle or something like that.

Hope that helps, my opinion's as valid as anyone else, so don't feel you should follow us all to the letter.


Coming from the deep South here in America, gravy consists of the meat drippings (the left over liquid fat) mixed with flour, salt, and a few spices. It usually is served with turkey, chicken, beef, or pork, but I don't remember ever having a fish gravy.

Biscuts and Gravy, my brother loves that stuff when we're in the states, personally I think it looks repulsive, but i'm just one of those people who has to lambast american cuisine.

Gravy over here is usually on meat, some like it on fish and chips but you wouln't put it on any fish meal, like salmon for example.

TheBigBadWolf
06-12-2007, 13:13
Lets settle this the best fish n chips are scottish where you get a haddock supper with salt and vinigar, if you are in edingburgh its salt n sauce. no mushy peas either thats an english thing. and deffinatley not on a poly box or any type of box, it has to be wrapped in paper. oh and a pickled egg or onion on the side

alexh
06-12-2007, 13:14
There's more to UK cuisine than fish and chips, you know. We also have:

Battered sausage and chips
Plain sausage and chips
Deep fried burger and chips
Pie and chips
Faggots and chips
Deep fried pizza and chips
Rissole and chips
Chicken and chips
Kebab meat and chips

You forgot the most important one - The Parmo. Although if you are not from Boro you probably won't know it. Basically, it is a fillet of either pork or chicken covered in white sauce, cheese and breadcrumbs and then fried :D

reds8n
06-12-2007, 13:19
I'd recommend having a plate of really cheap white bread there as well, spread with cheap margarine. Ideally the bread should be so cheap that it becomes almost transparent when chips are added to complete the buttie, and it is perfectly accetable for the entire structure to collapse when the ketchup is added.

Jomee
06-12-2007, 13:23
Here's a question for my British Warseer friends? What makes the perfect meal of Fish & Chips.

What kind of fish, the perfect beverage to wash it down, the sides to go with it, the seasoning etc... I need to know.

Late this month I've a British friend coming in town (Christmas) and I thought I'd surprise her with a bit of home. She talks endlessly about them, how much she misses them and how impossible to find a good plate of fish and chips in Chicago and on and on about how good they are.
Years ago I was in London, had a plate and had to admit, she right. They are pretty darn good. So I have a good idea of what they're supposed to be like. Now I want to make them, help me out.


I always get haddock (my dad is from a fishing family, and used to tell me that MOST COD HAVE WORMS! He knows his stuff, so I follow that advice on the rare occasions I have fish and chips). Chips must be fried, preferably deep fried. Not healthy but it has to be that way for proper effect.

Luke
06-12-2007, 13:25
MOST COD HAVE WORMS!

I heard that everything on the planet has worms. Or rather "nematodes". Its only the precence of a nematode not "native" to an organism which is recognised as a parasite.

THE CHIEF
06-12-2007, 13:32
I'd recommend having a plate of really cheap white bread there as well, spread with cheap margarine. Ideally the bread should be so cheap that it becomes almost transparent when chips are added to complete the buttie, and it is perfectly accetable for the entire structure to collapse when the ketchup is added.

Haha that's a good addition. I also second the pickled/scotch egg and/or pickled onions. Man I'm hungry now.

de Selby
06-12-2007, 13:35
I'm very impressed by your willingness to go so far to reproduce British 'cuisine' for a visitor. Next stop, jellied eels!

Don't be surprised if you can't get them the same way as chip shops can manage in their gigantic friers. It's very difficult. I think it's better to err on the side of drier and crispier, because it's difficult to get the softness of freshly fried chip-shop chips without them going squidgy.

Jomee
06-12-2007, 13:35
I heard that everything on the planet has worms. Or rather "nematodes". Its only the precence of a nematode not "native" to an organism which is recognised as a parasite.

Yeah but there's worms (a bit of extra protein!), and there's worms. Cod have the second type (the bad kind).

Ozorik
06-12-2007, 13:42
You forgot the most important one - The Parmo

There is a reason that people from middlesbrough are 25% more likely to die of heart failure. I was conned into getting a parmo once. The fact that is had a sea of grease about 1cm deep in the centre of it made my appetite go away.

Incentally are there any worthwhile chippies in Middlesbrough? Ive only found unspeakably bad ones.

Worms are like every other parasite, we dont spontaneously generate them. Only a few species can survive in us and only a few of them will cause us any problems. Fish tapeworm however can grow to 10 meters in length (I think you can only get them from fresh water fish though) so make sure that you cook them properly. Its not the worm to watch out for its the eggs.

swordwind
06-12-2007, 13:44
Next, deep fried mars bar

reds8n
06-12-2007, 13:50
Man I'm hungry now.



QFT ! :o

Tomorrow we should do a straw poll and see what % of people who posted/read on here bought chips & theirfavourite tonight.

Bombot
06-12-2007, 14:09
QFT ! :o

Tomorrow we should do a straw poll and see what % of people who posted/read on here bought chips & theirfavourite tonight.

You know, I was going to hold out till tomorrow as we get it at work on Fridays.

But then someone had to bring up worms :mad:

El Presedente
06-12-2007, 14:12
There's a chippy called The Abbey Friar in Liverpool just down the road from me, one of the best I've found, and I come from Cumbria where every third buiding is either a Pub or a Chippy.

forgotten hero
06-12-2007, 14:17
sorry to go back a bit...

But my typical Fish 'n Chips.

Fish - COD
Chips - Big thick English Chips!
Curry Saurce, damn it goes nice with fish!!!
Salt + Vinegar
Drink - hmm toughy really, depends on mood, between Lager or... Orange Juice.

as for posting back tomorrow saying "i've had fish 'n chips" well im hungry now.. and have a craving for it now!!! ;)

-Rob (Cya tomorrow :p)

TheBigBadWolf
06-12-2007, 14:28
I second that it has to be eaten with IRN BRU although it can be hard to get in england and impossible for the US as its banned there

McMullet
06-12-2007, 14:32
I'd go for haddock, partly because of the texture and also it's not quite as overfished as cod. Oh, and my local chippy sells more cod than haddock, so if you ask for haddock they cook it fresh rather than just getting one out of the heated cabinet thing.

Chips should be cut thick and deep fried, wrapped in paper and placed in a plastic carrier bag, then carried around outside in the cold air for about 5 minutes to impart the appropriate level of slight sogginess. Not too much sogginess, just a bit that comes from sweating for five minutes. Also, the paper will soak away some of the grease.

I'm not a big fan of batter myself - it's not really there to be eaten as I understand it, it just allows the fish to cook more gently (by steaming inside the batter case rather than by frying, which would make it tough on the outside). However, if you're going to eat it should be pretty thin (when you have loads it soaks up all the grease, making it very filling and pretty unhealthy I guess...), crispy and cooked all the way through. Wrapping the fish in paper for a few minutes will also soak up some of the grease.

Mushy peas are awesome. Get dried marrowfat peas, soak overnight, then simmer for an hour or two to make a dahl-like condiment.

Mmm. Chips.

Bombot
06-12-2007, 14:46
I second that it has to be eaten with IRN BRU although it can be hard to get in england and impossible for the US as its banned there

I've never had problems getting Irn Bru in England (I drink it semi-regularly), although I admit it's not as common as something like Coke.

Why on Earth is Irn Bru banned in the States? I know some countries ban Red Bull, but that's far more potent.

TheBigBadWolf
06-12-2007, 15:21
I've never had problems getting Irn Bru in England (I drink it semi-regularly), although I admit it's not as common as something like Coke.

Why on Earth is Irn Bru banned in the States? I know some countries ban Red Bull, but that's far more potent.

Sorry ive not been south of the border in a few years but it used to be difficult to get hold off, i remember the glacant look in peoples eyes when I asked for it

As for the US its something to do with the colouring, the US claims its carconegnic (sp)

moose
06-12-2007, 15:27
I'd recommend having a plate of really cheap white bread there as well, spread with cheap margarine. Ideally the bread should be so cheap that it becomes almost transparent when chips are added to complete the buttie, and it is perfectly accetable for the entire structure to collapse when the ketchup is added.

Sounds like a perfect chip butty to me!

forgotten hero
06-12-2007, 15:29
Yum!! Crips butties are better imo, my gf got me onto them... bitch ;)

cannot beat a Salt + Vinegar Butty before bed after a heavy night out.

-Rob

ozzfan
06-12-2007, 16:04
I'm Hungry...

Anyway, I always have Curry Sauce with mine, the proper chip-shop curry sauce, with lumps and everything. Mmmmm.

If you're feeling really greedy, get a battered sausage too.

Corrupt
06-12-2007, 17:30
Cod/Haddock. Crispy Batter
Thick Golden Brown, slightly soft chips
Lots of white sliced bread(buttered) [Bread buns may suffice]
Whole thing in paper preferebly
Plenty of S+V, Ketchup and Brown Sauce on table
Option fo beans, mushy peas, curry or gravy
And a slice of lemon if you want slighty "upmarket" fish effect

reds8n
06-12-2007, 18:01
Irn Bru is ace, goes well with Vodka, and even cures hangovers ! Fact.*



<takes a deep breathe> Hello everyone, my names reds8n, and.... and....and I caved in on the way home and bought a $%^&*(£ massive bag of chips, battered sausage and a couple of white rolls.

And I'm not ashamed.:angel:;)


*Fact, may in fact not be true.

TheBigBadWolf
06-12-2007, 18:11
Irn Bru is ace, goes well with Vodka

Ahh yes the girder my 2nd favourite drink after rum and water

Deamon-forge
06-12-2007, 19:03
Next, deep fried mars bar

2nd that first one is nice but dont do more than 3 as it will br in a bowl infront of you with every thing els you eaten...

back on topic , chips were todays meal, nice thick chips, haddock today very nice and curry saurce. went down great with a can of Dr peper yum

kyussinchains
06-12-2007, 19:57
if you want to make really good fish and chips, you need a wok and corn oil my friend!

most white fish is good, although turbot is apparently the best (according to three michelin starred chef heston blumenthal anyway) with monkfish a close second.

I've had really good experiences with Pollack m'self, you need to experiment and see what you like.

for the spuds, maris piper are about the most ideal chips as they have the magic 22% dry matter content which makes chips so good.

chop them into quite thick chips, then rinse them off a couple of times to remove any starch. Boil them for 3 minutes, then drain and stick in the fridge to firm them back up. Now you have two choices, you can spray a baking pan with fry light, arrange the chips and roast, or you can double fry them in a deep fat fryer.

for the batter I'd suggest 2 parts plain white flour to one part wholemeal, a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of paprika, dilute to the consistency of thick paint with malty brown beer, the fizzier the better.

slice the fish into strips around an inch and a half wide and pat dry with a towel.

pour a few inches of oil into your wok and get it nice and hot (you can test it with a slice of potato) put some cornflour onto a plate, roll your fish in it, then dunk in the batter and bung into the oil, fry 2-3 pieces at a time.

serve with white bread and butter and mushy peas, as well as the choice of sauces and salt and vinegar

all fizzy drinks go with fish and chips, all the aforementioned beverages are excellent!

TheBigBadWolf
06-12-2007, 20:44
No one has mentioned white pudding suppers yet they are good, and should be tried

Cade
06-12-2007, 20:48
http://www.seafoodtraining.org/fish_and_chips%20_3.jpg

Modern_Angel
06-12-2007, 20:50
Nothing tops staggering home at 3am from the night club, slightly the worse for wear due to drink and picking up a glass bottle of Irn Bru and a Haggis supper covered in tons of chippy sauce! *

Deep Fried Haggis > All :)

* - Please note your arteries and heart might not agree with the above statement.

I can't offer any advice regarding fish, as I don't eat fish, but chips have to be big, chunky, squashy and eaten with your fingers.

Toddy
06-12-2007, 21:06
Materialising out of the warp for this important topic - to remind everyone that Scraps are a neccesity - the bits of batter that fall into the fryer, strained off.

Fish has to be Haddock, Cod's only traditional in Chip Shops in the same way that syphilis is traditional in brothels - it's always been there, but you'd best avoid it nowadays.

For Drinks, it has to be one of the holy trinity - Irn Bru, Vimto or Dandelion & Burdock.

I'm a Chip-shop-Curry man nowadays, but for autenticity, go with the Mushy peas (in a seperate pot, just in case)

scratchbuilt
06-12-2007, 21:10
Heh, to be honest, I've never noticed the diff between good fish and chips, and bad ones. Lots of vinegar, salt. Chip butty is nice.
I want a chip butty:cries:

Ozorik
06-12-2007, 21:31
A good haggis supper is very hard to beat. Haddock is very inferior to cod in my esteemed opinion.

I cant stand bad chippies, it the main reason I rarely go to them. There is nothing worse than a greasy bag full of mush which is what I usually end up with. Good chippies are hard to find.

Corrupt
06-12-2007, 21:38
Ooooooooooh scraps
Nicest part of the meal I swear to God!
Agreed on Trinity of fizzy drinks.
A pint of Tea or Beer also works well

Jedi152
06-12-2007, 21:51
In my experience:

North: Fish and chips taste better but less choice of fish.
South: Doesn't taste as good for some reason but tons of choice of fish.

Midlands, or at least where i am (pretty much as far from the sea as you can get in the uk): Bugger all choice of fish. I don't have cod as it's overfished, so haddock's my only choice.

m3ntor
06-12-2007, 21:55
I'm not British, but I consider myself somewhat of a Fish'n'chip connoisseur.

And god knows why I have this pic, but I knew it would come in handy someday.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/m3ntor/Misc/Fishnchips.jpg

I'd say for the fish use Groper. It's one of the fish used in fish fillets here. A nice, thick fish and fairly firm. Avoid Hoki, or things of similar ilk. Far too soft. Of course, with fish, the fresher the better.
Personally I like fairly thick batter, slightly 'undercooked', so there is a nice mushy layer underneath the cruchy outer coating. I suspect the key to cooking is to have the fat fairly hot and not to cook for too long.

Be sure to deep fry in fat, not oil. Although good F&C can be achieved in oil, more often than not it isn't. If you're eating F&Cs you're not concerned about your health anyway (By which I mean eating such food once a week does no harm).

As far as chips go, they need to be rather chunky and irregular, but not wedges. Never disregard any small bits of chip nor any pieces of batter. They go nice and crunchy.

It is compulsary that F&Cs be wrapped in paper, and should be eaten with one's hands, or plastic cutlery if absolutely necessary. Apply plenty of salt before wrapping, leave all other additions to the eater. Serve with white bread for butties &c. Nearby have vinegar and tomato sauce (Watties here, preferably in a plastic bottle shaped like a tomato).

For drinks, personally I like milk, but soft drinks and booze also work.


Thank god today is Friday. ...Only five hours 'til tea.

Shadowseer Crofty
06-12-2007, 22:34
Midlands, or at least where i am (pretty much as far from the sea as you can get in the uk): Bugger all choice of fish.

So there's no point me trying to find a decent chippie in Kegworth then?

The pestilent 1
06-12-2007, 22:36
There is this Chip Shop in Eastleigh (Just north of Southampton) That does the best Cod in the known world :D
(And Chicken Curry, but that's besides the point.)

alexh
06-12-2007, 22:54
Incentally are there any worthwhile chippies in Middlesbrough? Ive only found unspeakably bad ones.

Mr Chippy in Brambles Farm is a good one but unfortunately it is now two bus rides away from me. You could also try Croft Avenue or the big one at Belle Vue.

max the dog
06-12-2007, 23:31
There are so many regional variations of how they are cooked. It would help if you said where your friend was from. In Lancashire the chips tend to be cooked in vegetable fat, and in Yorkshire, which has a direct border with Lancs they often use beef fat...

She's from Birkenhead England. I haven't the slightest idea of exactly where that's at.

max the dog
06-12-2007, 23:33
I'm not British, but I consider myself somewhat of a Fish'n'chip connoisseur.

And god knows why I have this pic, but I knew it would come in handy someday.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/m3ntor/Misc/Fishnchips.jpg


Thanks for the pic, that clears up the cut of the chips a bit. By the way, what is the red thing in the picture? It looks like someone deep fried a sausage.

El Presedente
07-12-2007, 00:05
She's from Birkenhead England. I haven't the slightest idea of exactly where that's at.

Its near liverpool if I remember rightly


By the way, what is the red thing in the picture? It looks like someone deep fried a sausage.

Thats exactly what it is!

Karloth Valois
07-12-2007, 00:11
I worked in a very good fish and chip shop for 5 years part time whilst I was at college and home from uni, I still love some decent fish and chips but its easy to get it wrong like a lot of places. High quality ingredients is paramount as with most cooking. Cod for the fish is your best bet imo, everyone likes cod so you can't go wrong. Good cod is sweet, it loses the sweetness the longer it's left so try and get it nice and fresh. Make sure you beat the batter heavily so it has lots of air in it, the batter will come out a lot more crisp when cooked. Slap the cod into a bowl of rice cones (ground up rice, like sand or course powder) and give it a very light coating, this will stop the batter from seperating and falling off the cod whilst frying. There are probably many other substitutes for this material, do some research, anything to stop the batter falling off. Be very careful not to overcook the fish aswell, it is easily done. This is done at about 150C if I remember correctly.

Make sure you get some nice fluffy potatoes, with high levels of drymatter (waxy potatoes are the opposite and have low levels of drymatter). A quick search should find you the right breed of potatoes to use. King Edwards, fambo, victoria, anything with lots of drymatter are all good. One important thing is to blanche the chips first, never cook them through in one go. One of the main reasons chips done in a fish and chip shop are nicer than those fried at home is because they have time to blanche them. Cook them at about 130C in oil, and periodically take a chip out and push your thumb into it (it will burn a bit and be very hot, either wear thin catering gloves or suck it up). Once the chip has a little bit of "give", i.e. its formed a bit of a skin that you can feel your thumb push through into the softer inside, take them out and let them site for 10 minutes till they've cooled a bit. After that, finnish them off at about 165C. Don't overcook them obviously but do them until the tips of some of the small / wispy little chips are going brown. Make sure the chips are thick enough but not like logs, and not thin like french fries. Do a couple of test batches of chips to find out how you like them done and get some practice in would be a good idea. They should have a slightly crispy skin and a soft fluffy interior.

Good choice of oil is very important, get nice high quality stuff with some flavour to it. Don't go for low fat stuff or anything made from weird plants. The oil used in good chip shops is quite expensive, and is solid at room temperature, most places probably go through £30 ($60) of oil a night if its busy.

Hope that helps a bit!

hairyman
07-12-2007, 08:22
No one has mentioned white pudding suppers yet they are good, and should be tried

Mmmmmmm.... yeah. :)

DarthSte
07-12-2007, 08:33
Irn Bru is ace, goes well with Vodka, and even cures hangovers ! Fact.*

*Fact, may in fact not be true.

Vodka Irn Bru... Jeez it must be 10 years since I've had that. My mission for this weekend is to re-acquaint myself with that old friend.

Not ideal with F&C though. I still stand by a nice cup of tea.

DarthSte
07-12-2007, 08:38
Materialising out of the warp for this important topic - to remind everyone that Scraps are a neccesity - the bits of batter that fall into the fryer, strained off.


Again I think scraps are a very regional thing, I once went into a chippie in Bath and asked for scraps with my fish and chips and the guy serving thought I was begging. Rather embarrassing.

Sojourner
07-12-2007, 09:13
North: Fish and chips taste better but less choice of fish.

What on earth? All the fish comes from the north.

As for scraps - I don't know anyone that'd eat them. Apparently in cornwall they're concerned enough about their reputation that they absolutely won't serve them, as they're classed as industrial waste.

Typheron
07-12-2007, 09:14
Birkenhead = Liverpool pritty much, although i dare say those local to it will say other wise but i dont know any better, i live 230 ish miles away.

Better make your fish fresh.

Brother Loki
07-12-2007, 09:36
This recipe has a photo, so you can see what it should look like at the end:

http://www.recipezaar.com/183399

Beer batter isn't actually the norm as far as I know, so here's anothe batter recipe:

http://www.bordeglobal.com/foruminv/index.php?act=ST&f=106&t=17075&

There's not a great deal of fancy seasoning involved - that's where the condiments come in, which your friend will want to add herself.

Personally my favourite accompaniment is mushy peas for the vegetable, with salt, and a little vinegar, and tomato ketchup.

Not sure if you can get mushy peas in the states, so here goes:

http://www.wight.co.uk/food/recipes.99/11.99/

I like a nice pint of bitter with it, but that would be pretty subjective. Coke is an acceptable alternative, or tea.

Burnthem
07-12-2007, 09:57
Cool thread, although im a bit confused as to why everybody is extolling the virtues of eating Cities of Death mini's? based on your recommendations i have chewed on a couple of CoD figures, even a bit of scenery, and to be honest i am a bit dissapointed. Do you have different CoD models in the north or something??

Hehe, on a serious note, you cant beat some good Fish and Chips, best ever for me would have to be the HUGE fish and chips i got from Newton Stewart in Galloway, Scotland, they were absolutely gorgeous. Maybe it was because i'd just spent 2 weeks in the woods living off rations, but hey, it made the f+c taste great!

scratchbuilt
07-12-2007, 10:05
Make sure you beat the batter heavily

Fnark! Fnark! (for all the other viz fans)


Thanks for the pic, that clears up the cut of the chips a bit. By the way, what is the red thing in the picture? It looks like someone deep fried a sausage.

I feel very barbaric all of a sudden. Yes we batter sausages:(

Jedi152
07-12-2007, 11:51
So there's no point me trying to find a decent chippie in Kegworth then?
Well there's Charlies on the main road, if he hasn't been shut down by now. It's not brilliant (unless it's been done up or something) but it's ok for a quick bite to eat. I don't think i ever dared to try his fish.

RevEv
07-12-2007, 13:00
This is a very good recipe

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/fishandchips_70937.shtml

The fish should be any firm, white fish. Cod is usual, but Hoki - a NZ fish - is now often used as an alternative (Cod stocks in the North Sea are severely depleted). Pollock is coming in as another alternative but I have seen Plaice, skate, and haddock all offered in local chippies.

Batter - plenty of it and nice and crispy.

Chips have to be large and chunky and also crispy.

The secret has to be the oil - vegetable is best and nice and hot. The outside of the food should fry almost as soon as it hits the batter keeping the insides moist but not too greasy. Seriously, this is the secret. A good chippie will heat its oil for a while before opening the doors to customers, and the best chips will always be served near the end of the evening when the fat is really hot.

As for the best fish and chips - I've eaten at Rick Stein's fish and chip shop in Padstow and it is excellent (first fish and chip shop I've heard the guy cooking the stuff referred to as 'Chef'). Also been to the Hive Beach Cafe at Burton Bradstock, Dorset which is recommended by Rick Stein and the Sunday Time food critic AA Gill - again excellent. Best fish and chips by far though is CJ's by the harbour at West Bay, Dorset. I would go there after work for Sunday Lunch even though it was a forty minute drive from home.

(For the uninitiated - Rick Stein is recognised as THE fish expert by top chefs, even Gordon Ramsey had something good to say about him).

Lavadude360
07-12-2007, 15:23
Gravy is key, "Us northern lads love us gravy!"


I can't believe the chippy hasn't made it to the USA or am I missing something.

The best fish 'n' chips are straight from a good chippy drenched in vinegar salt and of course GRAVY!!! :D

the dude-
the lavadude! :eek:

DeathlessDraich
07-12-2007, 15:42
In London curry has overtaken F&C in popularity but I can see that enthusiasm for F&C is still very strong with various regions claiming to have the 'best' version.
Having lived in Yorks, Lancs. and Gloucs. over the years, I can safely say that the best chips are my mother-in-law's and she's Welsh!

Ozorik
07-12-2007, 17:19
You could also try Croft Avenue or the big one at Belle Vue.


I live about 300 meters from the Belle Vue one and I class it as unspeakably bad. Ive been there twice and both times I ended up bining the chips. That being said I feel the desire of a chippie and it is close......

The best chippie I have been to recently was Leo Burdocks on Rathmines road in Dublin. Big portions as well.

WLBjork
07-12-2007, 17:37
Again I think scraps are a very regional thing, I once went into a chippie in Bath and asked for scraps with my fish and chips and the guy serving thought I was begging. Rather embarrassing.

I think they are, namewise at least. Round here I'm pretty certain we call them "batter bits".

Mad Doc Grotsnik
07-12-2007, 18:17
Here's a question for my British Warseer friends? What makes the perfect meal of Fish & Chips.

What kind of fish, the perfect beverage to wash it down, the sides to go with it, the seasoning etc... I need to know.

Late this month I've a British friend coming in town (Christmas) and I thought I'd surprise her with a bit of home. She talks endlessly about them, how much she misses them and how impossible to find a good plate of fish and chips in Chicago and on and on about how good they are.
Years ago I was in London, had a plate and had to admit, she right. They are pretty darn good. So I have a good idea of what they're supposed to be like. Now I want to make them, help me out.

As a Scot, a Fish Supper should have Salt and Sauce, served in yesterdays Newspaper. I dunno how, it just tastes better. And all washed down with Irn Bru.

N.B. DO NOT USE VEGETABLE OIL FOR YOUR FRYING. Only good old fashioned Lard will do. The donor animals would want it that way!

El Presedente
07-12-2007, 18:20
I can't believe the chippy hasn't made it to the USA or am I missing something.

Well, accasionally you'll get a resturant that has "fish n' chips" on the menu, but this either ends up as being fish and crisps or fish and fries.

The most authentic chippy i've seen in the US was is downtown disney, where it was attached to an Irish pub for some reason?

Fenriz
07-12-2007, 18:27
One of the chippys where i live got voted the best chippy in Britain recently. By god theyre good. :eek:

And funnily enough the place im moving to in a few months has the second best in Britain. :p

I love me some fish and chips. In fact, i may head down to my local in a second. :D

Bombot
07-12-2007, 18:41
The most authentic chippy i've seen in the US was is downtown disney, where it was attached to an Irish pub for some reason?

I reckon the world has Irish pubs because no-one can really tell the difference between them and English pubs, but Irish pubs don't have the association with football hooligans. Something like that anyway.

Brimstone
07-12-2007, 19:09
The best fish & chips are normally found by the sea especially when the fish is brought locally.

My best experience has been here, (http://www.goldengrid.co.uk/) yum I could eat there right now.

forgotten hero
08-12-2007, 10:03
i tucked into a large fish (Cod), chips and curry source with D&B for a drink... what can i say! YUM!!!

-Rob

Mad Doc Grotsnik
08-12-2007, 10:43
I'm off to Eastbourne with my newly acquired other half today. I'm thinking genuine, traditional Fish and Chips, eaten in the car, parked near the beach, with appaling weather....

Thats right, it's time to feel truly British!

Luke
08-12-2007, 11:25
If I wasn't some massively ugly and fat I would probably go for some fish and chips right about now.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
08-12-2007, 11:27
Don't be a ponce.

Fish and Chips make you happy. Happy leads to confidence. Chicks dig confidence.....

Luke
08-12-2007, 11:39
Don't be a ponce.

Fish and Chips make you happy. Happy leads to confidence. Chicks dig confidence.....

I'm gay :p

Corrupt
08-12-2007, 12:32
I'm gay :p

So do men:P

Just ordered dad to grab me some on way home from trip to helmsley
Cod, Chips, Mushy Peas, Scraps and an Irn Bru

SonofUltramar
08-12-2007, 14:03
Lets settle this the best fish n chips are scottish where you get a haddock supper with salt and vinigar, if you are in edingburgh its salt n sauce. no mushy peas either thats an english thing. and deffinatley not on a poly box or any type of box, it has to be wrapped in paper. oh and a pickled egg or onion on the side

Mushy Peas are a staple side at pretty much every chip shop i've been to throughout Scotland? Wouldn't say its an English thing? An English thing is saying sod the fish make it a pie, or is that just when I visit Wigan, lol

Despite whats been said for me a proper fish & chips is Battered Haddock, some chunky chips and some mushy peas with either Tartare Sauce or Heinz Ketchup, in fact i'm going to have that for dinner tonight:D

El Presedente
08-12-2007, 14:08
An English thing is saying sod the fish make it a pie, or is that just when I visit Wigan, lol

Do you know why there's holes in the top of pies? so people from Wigan can carry ten at a time. ROFLMAO!

SonofUltramar
08-12-2007, 14:12
Do you know why there's holes in the top of pies? so people from Wigan can carry ten at a time. ROFLMAO!

Everybody knows you stack them up so you can carry more;) They are good though...

JonnyX
08-12-2007, 16:11
Get a nice fish (your talking to a brummy here :)) and chips, the chips have to be chunky and swimming in salt and vinegar

Luke
08-12-2007, 16:29
Get a nice fish (your talking to a brummy here :)) and chips, the chips have to be chunky and swimming in salt and vinegar

Yay! fellow brummy!

Yam all-roit? What yow need wi' that is a nice kipper tie!

TheBigBadWolf
08-12-2007, 17:31
Mushy Peas are a staple side at pretty much every chip shop i've been to throughout Scotland? Wouldn't say its an English thing? An English thing is saying sod the fish make it a pie, or is that just when I visit Wigan, lol

Despite whats been said for me a proper fish & chips is Battered Haddock, some chunky chips and some mushy peas with either Tartare Sauce or Heinz Ketchup, in fact i'm going to have that for dinner tonight:D

Woo you are from only like 20miles from me in arbroath and no chippy serves peas period, ive been to chippies in dundee and no one has peas

SonofUltramar
08-12-2007, 17:42
Woo you are from only like 20miles from me in arbroath and no chippy serves peas period, ive been to chippies in dundee and no one has peas

Holy Emperor, where I used to live their were two chippers that did good mushy peas, The Silvery Tay and The Phoenix (not to be confused with the pub in town) and the four within 10 minutes of my new place also do peas, to varying degrees, lol

Burnthem
08-12-2007, 18:04
Dont forget the most important rule of all!! - They MUST be eaten with your fingers, no knives and forks allowed!!!

Luke
08-12-2007, 18:10
Bah, a wooden fork is tradition up our way.

Warboss Jhura Ironfang
09-12-2007, 00:47
Is there any chance you lot can send all the very tasty sounding food to your deprived American friend? I mean, we don't have good F&C here or nothing! Preferably for Christmas wrapped in greasy newspaper? Willing to sample any foods listed here in the thread.

Cheerz,

A very hungry WB Ironfang

dr.oetk3r
09-12-2007, 01:44
You go to the chippy van, get the fish and chips (wrapped in newspaper mind you) eat them with a spork and put salt and vineger on them.

Freak Ona Leash
09-12-2007, 01:53
Got to say, while I love ketchup, eating fries with salt and vinegar on them when I was in Ireland was just plain awesomeness incarnate. Kinda like the Irish themselves.

Oh, and all good fries are chunky, not thin and nasty.

m3ntor
10-12-2007, 00:41
Thanks for the pic, that clears up the cut of the chips a bit. By the way, what is the red thing in the picture? It looks like someone deep fried a sausage.

That would be a Hot Dog. Also avaliable on a stick.


The fish should be any firm, white fish. Cod is usual, but Hoki - a NZ fish - is now often used as an alternative (Cod stocks in the North Sea are severely depleted).

Yeah, I would recommend against Hoki. It can be, and is, used, but IMO is far too soft.

Shadowseer Crofty
10-12-2007, 09:11
Got to say, while I love ketchup, eating fries with salt and vinegar on them when I was in Ireland was just plain awesomeness incarnate. Kinda like the Irish themselves.

Oh, and all good fries are chunky, not thin and nasty.

they're called CHIPS! Hence the term "fish and chips". Fries are a completely different thing.

El Presedente
10-12-2007, 09:29
That would be a Hot Dog. Also avaliable on a stick.

Hate to have to correct you here, but I don't want you confusing people.

Its not a hot dog, its definately a battered sausage.

forgotten hero
10-12-2007, 09:36
That would be a Hot Dog. Also avaliable on a stick.

Thats a battered sausage mate.

-Rob

Freak Ona Leash
10-12-2007, 10:49
they're called CHIPS! Hence the term "fish and chips". Fries are a completely different thing.

When I went to Ireland, they served us "chips" at a resturant. They were waht us Yanks call fries. What we call chips is whay you silly Brits call crisps...I think.

But yeah, fries>chips.

alexh
10-12-2007, 11:04
When I went to Ireland, they served us "chips" at a resturant. They were waht us Yanks call fries. What we call chips is whay you silly Brits call crisps...I think.

But yeah, fries>chips.

Chips and Fries are not the same. Chips are chunky and yummy, Fries are thin and tasteless.

Bombot
10-12-2007, 11:50
However, what you get in a restaurant is usually some half-way house, neither truly chip nor truly fry.

RevEv
10-12-2007, 14:09
Wooden forks are for wooses!

Getting third degree burns on your fingers is part of the whole experience!

Freak Ona Leash
10-12-2007, 19:44
Chips and Fries are not the same. Chips are chunky and yummy, Fries are thin and tasteless.
Here in America we call any sliced and fried potato thing fries. Thick and chunky ones are steak fries or home-fries or simply, big, yummy fries. Thin fries are usually called fries or thin pieces of ****. I obviosuly prefer the thick and tasty ones.

I am also beginning to think fries are their own form of sexual metaphor.

The pestilent 1
10-12-2007, 21:04
However, what you get in a restaurant is usually some half-way house, neither truly chip nor truly fry.

Truly, they live a cursed life.
Never knowing fry. Never knowing Chip.
*mourns for Frhips*

Chiron
10-12-2007, 21:18
Northern chips and gravy, perhaps the only way of making a small boy visit his Gran :P


God I miss that gravy, it was so thick the spoon stood up

salty
10-12-2007, 23:04
I don't understand how people can hate Mushy Peas... though they are best with pie and gravy. On topic however, I am told that sparkling/fizzy water is used in the batter mix in chip shops to give that light, bubbly effect the batter has. I have only hearsay to back this up of course, but if you are going to experiment it could be worth a try!

Salty :)

m3ntor
11-12-2007, 20:48
Hate to have to correct you here, but I don't want you confusing people.

Its not a hot dog, its definately a battered sausage.

No, it's a hot dog. Ultimately, it is a battered sausage of sorts, but still. Hot dog.
(And yes, different to an 'American Hot dog', aka Frankfurter.)

Luke
11-12-2007, 20:59
Hot dog? Isn't that one of those salty, red little tubes of mush you get in a bun in cinemas?


The thing in the photo is a battered SAUSAGE! Big meaty and full of goodness. Pure win.

El Presedente
11-12-2007, 21:17
No, it's a hot dog. Ultimately, it is a battered sausage of sorts, but still. Hot dog.
(And yes, different to an 'American Hot dog', aka Frankfurter.)

Ok, hang on, lets double back here and look at the evidence

1)The article in question http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/m3ntor/Misc/Fishnchips.jpg
2)The fact that you took the pic, and were there first hand
3)a shot of some hot dogs http://z.about.com/d/homecooking/1/0/5/9/1/hotdogoctopus1.jpg
4)The fact that I nor many others have heard of the practice of battering hot dogs
5)the fact that battered (non hot dog) sausages are pretty common
6)the fact that as far as I know there is no such thing as anything other than an 'American hot dog'
7)the fact that you're from New Zealand

Upon looking at the pic, it is possible that it is a battered hot dog, which I find strange, unless thats common practice in NZ.

And so the conclusion is: we may never know for sure :confused:

EDIT: On further study (looking at the size of the sausage compared to the fish), it seems that the battered subject is far too big to be a hot dog, either that or thats one tiny fish.

Notorius
11-12-2007, 21:41
Actually, it looked like a battered saveloy (which ok, is a type or sausage but then technically so is a hot dog).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saveloy

TheBigBadWolf
11-12-2007, 22:21
That is definatley a sausage, ive never seen anyone batter a hotdog

m3ntor
11-12-2007, 22:48
3)a shot of some hot dogs http://z.about.com/d/homecooking/1/0/5/9/1/hotdogoctopus1.jpg

Herein lies the problem, I suspect.
It would seem by 'hot dog' you are referring to a particular type of sausage or thereabouts. This is something I was not entirely aware of (not that I'm a sausage expert), nor is it a common term here.
Here the term 'hot Dog' refers more to the manner in which it is served , rather than the meat itself, I suppose.
Thus we get:
An 'American Hot Dog' (Also referred to as just a 'hot dog' by a few, to increase confusion), served in a long bun with mustard and whathaveyou. Most commonly called a 'Frankfurter' after the sausage used.
And a 'Hot Dog' is a battered, deep fried saveloy. And it is what everyone assumes one means when one says 'hot dog'. It is never referred to as a battered sausage as that would imply a, well, battered sausage rather than a battered saveloy.

Also, if I may introduce exhibit C: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/m3ntor/Misc/WTSMMenu.jpg
(Note: This is not my local chippie (and these prices are fairly expensive))

And, following a little research:


[...]In New Zealand they are also known as hot dogs, while a hot dog in a bun is known as an "American hot dog". The batter used on New Zealand hot dogs is different, however, being that used for battering fish in fish & chip shops, resulting in a softer texture and less uniform shape.

So there. :p:D

El Presedente
11-12-2007, 23:36
well, that clears that up, but yeah, round our end a hot dog is whats served in a bun, any other use of the word is lunacy, but then again, you are on the side of the world where everything is upside down, and so I forgive you :p

However, many 'sausages' I come across in america are flattened like burgers, and don't really resemble a sausage at all.

pookie
12-12-2007, 13:26
lol, love it a thread about fish n chips n people are debating Hot Dogs!!! ( which we do not batter over here in the Uk and they cant be termed the same as a sausage as there made from chicken! )

to the OP - i think that at the end of the day the gesture of what you are doing will be more than enough even if you dont get things spot on how your friend would like em, to be it deff is the thought that counts with something like this.

evil
12-12-2007, 16:46
Whatever you do, add curry sauce :p

spaint2k
15-12-2007, 13:42
It's a little late for this, but for the Americans still reading, it is essential that fish and chips are accompanied by MALT vinegar, not the white vinegar that you typically find over there.

Steve

El Presedente
15-12-2007, 13:44
It's a little late for this, but for the Americans still reading, it is essential that fish and chips are accompanied by MALT vinegar, not the white vinegar that you typically find over there.

Steve

even though it tastes the same anyway

Cade
15-12-2007, 16:39
It's a little late for this, but for the Americans still reading, it is essential that fish and chips are accompanied by MALT vinegar, not the white vinegar that you typically find over there.

Steve

Or even better...........the vingegar from a jar of pickled onions!

Onion juice is amazing on fish 'n' chips.

scratchbuilt
15-12-2007, 16:45
Just thinking of pickled onions makes me want to yak. All those big jars of pickled things, all taste like yak.

To be blunt. Out the freezer into the oven tastes pretty much the same.:o

Sojourner
15-12-2007, 18:53
And a 'Hot Dog' is a battered, deep fried saveloy. And it is what everyone assumes one means when one says 'hot dog'. It is never referred to as a battered sausage as that would imply a, well, battered sausage rather than a battered saveloy.

I have never heard of such a thing. The more you know...

max the dog
15-12-2007, 19:29
Sorry for the confusion, I'm a food snobish Chicagoan and my idea of a hot dog is much different than what the rest of the world (or my own county) thinks it is. It has to be pure 100% beef, a bit of added pork back fat, and slightly firm skin. That garbage we find in the grocery store won't do for me.

But enough on that, I started this thread and took your advice. To be more specific, I cheated. I found a grocery store in town owned by an English expatriate. He carries about everything you'd find in London. He sold me a 1Kilo bag of batter called Glu-to-go, a few thick fillet's of cod, and malt vinegar. I used a deep cast iron pot, corn oil and served it not on a plate but on parchment paper (sorry, the oil made the ink run or I would've used a newspaper as someone suggested).
Yum Yum Yum
I mixed the batter a bit too thick but it was tasty. My house may smell like a seaport but all are well fed and satisfied. Our get together is next weekend and yes, fish and chips will be what's for dinner.
Thanks all:p

Corrupt
15-12-2007, 19:54
(sorry, the oil made the ink run or I would've used a newspaper as someone suggested).

Thats half the point:D

alexh
15-12-2007, 19:55
I'm pleased the trial run went well and I'm sure your friend will feel honoured that you have gone to so much trouble for her.

Progena
15-12-2007, 20:11
Ah, British cooking...

I had fish and chips in Whitby, very good. I resisted trying Haggis when I was in Edinburgh... It was described to me as tasting like sticky hashed lungs. I had beef pie instead, which was pretty good.

But... the breakfast at the hotel... I ordered bacon and poached egg, and got a single piece of salted ham and the smallest egg I have ever seen. We just kept ordering toast after that... poor waiter didn't dare look us in the eye when we were done. Had kebabs for breakfast the rest of the week.

All countries have their weird traditional meals... Who'd want to eat half a sheep's head anyways?

scratchbuilt
15-12-2007, 21:25
Sorry for the confusion, I'm a food snobish Chicagoan and my idea of a hot dog is much different than what the rest of the world (or my own county) thinks it is. It has to be pure 100% beef, a bit of added pork back fat, and slightly firm skin. That garbage we find in the grocery store won't do for me.

But enough on that, I started this thread and took your advice. To be more specific, I cheated. I found a grocery store in town owned by an English expatriate. He carries about everything you'd find in London. He sold me a 1Kilo bag of batter called Glu-to-go, a few thick fillet's of cod, and malt vinegar. I used a deep cast iron pot, corn oil and served it not on a plate but on parchment paper (sorry, the oil made the ink run or I would've used a newspaper as someone suggested).
Yum Yum Yum
I mixed the batter a bit too thick but it was tasty. My house may smell like a seaport but all are well fed and satisfied. Our get together is next weekend and yes, fish and chips will be what's for dinner.
Thanks all:p

Now go see a doctor to have your cholesterol checked;)

forgotten hero
17-12-2007, 06:47
Now go see a doctor to have your cholesterol checked;)

Nah, ive been eating fish n chips for years, never done me any harm... *clenches heart* *thumps chest* *ah, that got the old ticker going again*

;)

-Rob

chromedog
17-12-2007, 07:49
You may not have "battered savs" in that part of the world, but then down here - where everything is THE RIGHT WAY UP, thank you, WE don't batter or deep fry mars bars. :D

Down here, a 'battered saveloy" is generally the sausage-like thing used in hot dogs (and generally speaking, flavourless and textureless) that has been battered and deep fried. On a stick, it's a "dagwood dog" or a "pluto pup" (and one end is dipped in some kind of red gunge - I've never been drunk enough to eat one. I've been drunk enough for a kebab, but the sav' is an order of magnitude worse) at least in my state; names for things change when you go to a different state.

I prefer a nice kielbasa on a bun with mustard and onions for my "hot dog".

I also prefer my fish grilled, since deep fried Atlantic salmon tastes foul (local fish, you can catch them off the beach).

Jedi152
17-12-2007, 07:51
No matter how much drink i've had, i could never bring myself to walk into a shop and ask for a "pluto pup" outside of Disneyland.

:D

The Dude
17-12-2007, 22:33
You may not have "battered savs" in that part of the world, but then down here - where everything is THE RIGHT WAY UP, thank you, WE don't batter or deep fry mars bars. :D

Now that depends on where you go. I had quite a nice Deep Fried Mars Bar in Port Pirie. Itís like a Pineapple Fritter, but with Mars Bar instead of Pineapple.

I almost died, it was so sweet :eek:

TheBigBadWolf
18-12-2007, 14:47
Nobody even eats deepfried mars bars anymore they were an over hyped fad taken up by big wigs in london who think thats all that scots eat.

forgotten hero
18-12-2007, 14:50
still true though, thats all the scots eat along with Hagis ;)

-Rob ;)

THE CHIEF
18-12-2007, 15:37
I love this thread. I didn't have fish and chips last week in the end, but I'm going to have to grab some tonight :)

mmmmm

Karhedron
18-12-2007, 19:14
The ultimate accompaniments to fish and chips are of course mushy peas...

And Wallies! :D

Now, is anyone from the right part of the world to know what a wally is?

THE CHIEF
19-12-2007, 19:15
Don't know if this is too late but I got bored and decided to track down the recipe I mentioned earlier from a TV program I had seen. Here's a link to an article about it:

Heston Blumenthal's Perfect Fish and Chips! (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/heston_blumenthal/article631377.ece?token=null&offset=0)

Rockin'

Hicks
21-12-2007, 01:50
Don't know if this is too late but I got bored and decided to track down the recipe I mentioned earlier from a TV program I had seen. Here's a link to an article about it:

Heston Blumenthal's Perfect Fish and Chips! (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/heston_blumenthal/article631377.ece?token=null&offset=0)

Rockin'

It might be because my english isn't perfect... but does the guy in the article really advice to spray pickled onion juice around the house!??!

Notorius
21-12-2007, 02:04
Not exactly. It says to use an atomiser (squirty bottle in simple terms) to spray the picked onion vinegar onto the chips but due to the nature of squirty bottles loads will get into the air.