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kyussinchains
20-12-2007, 16:13
I'm thinking of upgrading my computer in the new year (I dont get paid till december 31st) my wife has given me a budget of 200 to spend on stuff (she knows how nuts I tend to go...)

my current setup is

AMD Athlon64 3200+
1GB PC6400 ram
integrated 6100 geforce graphics
320 gb and 80gb hard drives

I've decided that I want to go the intel route, as they overclock better and seem to give all round better performance and although a quad core chip is out of my price range right now, it's my ultimate aim to get one.

I've decided to buy the following from scan.co.uk as it's the cheapest I can find

Intel E2140 dual core chip (apparently it's a good overclocker, most people can squeeze 3+ GHz out of it) - 41.75
Asus P5K i35 crossfire - 70.49
256MB powercolour Radeon 3850 - 105.15

giving me a total of 217.39 + shipping, that's really at the top of my budget, after I get paid again I'll grab a couple of gigs of ram and a titan amanda cooler.

can anyone else spend my cash any more efficiently for me? I'm mainly interested in playing games, supreme commander, unreal tournament 3, team fortress 2, possibly crysis, company of heroes. I reckon the machine should handle those shouldnt it?

opinions?

Sgt John Keel
20-12-2007, 16:19
Seems like a solid buy. Would you mind waiting until January the 20th when Intel releases it's new line of processors to see if prices fall a bit?

/Adrian

kyussinchains
20-12-2007, 16:34
good idea, I'll hang on a few more weeks (I've been waiting ages, so 3 weeks longer isnt much of a wait!)

giner
22-12-2008, 22:59
Sorry to high-jack the thread but I'm running a similar system. Could anyone give advice on graphics card (from Geforce 6150 LE) and explain the difference in performance between dual core and single. I only really strain the computer for RTSs if that makes a difference.

Thanks for any help.

WLBjork
23-12-2008, 07:03
With graphics cards, generally the second number is slightly more important than the first number. A Geforce 8800 is better than a Geforce 9600 for example.



Dual Core processors are a novel way of having 2 processors without increasing the size of the Motherboard.

Only games and applications specifically programmed to take advantage of multiple cores will benefit directly.

However, it is possible to use one core to run all the windows and background applications and the other core to run games/applications not programmed for multiple cores, and gain a performance boost that way.

Single cores have pretty much had their day now, dual and quad cores are the future.

Son of the Lion
23-12-2008, 08:28
With graphics cards, generally the second number is slightly more important than the first number. A Geforce 8800 is better than a Geforce 9600 for example.



Generally being the key word here. Try checking this link (http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/gaming-graphics-charts-q1-2008/3DMark06-v1-0-2-HDR-SM3-0-Score,538.html)to give yourself an idea of how the mainstream cards measure up to each other.

The range of games with multi-core support is actually growing very quickly, though it's not really being fully exploited by developers and you're unlikely to see a real boost unless you're running a killer DX10 rig anyway. For most people the best application of multicore CPUs is, as WBjork mentions, to task specific applications to each core.

Single cores are on the way out - they generally only find their way into cheaper or smaller mobile platforms / laptops now. Dual cores give a better performance overall, but be careful about assuming 'the more cores the better'. Though a Quad core CPU like the Q6600 (the most affordable intel quad) will beat any dual core into the ground on general performance, a high spec dual core like the E8400 (higher clock speed, lower core temperature) may actually be a better choice for a pure gaming PC, particularly considering what has been said about early days of multi-core support.

giner
23-12-2008, 09:43
Wow, that was quick and very helpful thank you.

One last thing how do I know if a graphics card is compatible with my computer? I'm tempted by the XFX GeForce 8400GS 512MB, I think it should work I'm using a dimensions C521.

bigshep
23-12-2008, 11:33
If you have a motherboard with pcie-16 slot then you will able to use pcie cards, if it has an agp slot then you can use agp cards. I would imagine that it has a pcie-16 slot, in which case the world is your oyster. If you open up the computer you will be able to see the slots on the motherboard and they will be labeled as to what they are just above the slot.

Actually just done a bit more research and it seems that you have a x1300 card fitted in a pciex16 slot, in which case teh cards below will work fine (though may need a bit of a PSU boost dependent upon you power supply rating)

For a 100 card you can get some lovely kit:
GTX8800 768mb card for just over 100
http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/specpage.html?NOV-88GTX

or

GTS8800 600mb card for 70!
http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/specpage.html?NOV-88GTS

enjoy

giner
23-12-2008, 11:53
Again you guys stagger me with your knowledge and time. Thanks.

Although I think I'll go with the XFX GeForce 8400GS, 512MB for 30 from Dixons without looking around (which I will).

Bombot
23-12-2008, 18:19
256MB powercolour Radeon 3850 - 105.15

This seems rather pricey; you can almost get a 4850 for that.

These ones are all cheaper:

http://www.dabs.com/ProductList.aspx?SearchTerms=3850&SearchMode=All&SearchKey=All&PageMode=3&NavigationKey=0&SearchType=1

weissengel86
24-12-2008, 07:52
With graphics cards, generally the second number is slightly more important than the first number. A Geforce 8800 is better than a Geforce 9600 for example.



Dual Core processors are a novel way of having 2 processors without increasing the size of the Motherboard.

Only games and applications specifically programmed to take advantage of multiple cores will benefit directly.

However, it is possible to use one core to run all the windows and background applications and the other core to run games/applications not programmed for multiple cores, and gain a performance boost that way.

Single cores have pretty much had their day now, dual and quad cores are the future.

good advice except your wrong on one thing the future is 8, 16, and 32 core computers. 8 core should be common by 2010. Along with windows 7 and generalized 64 bit OS's.



As for the OP's upgrade make sure you have plenty of RAM otherwise a million core computer wont mean anything. Performance is based on a few key aspects and if one is lacking your computer will perform as well as the worst component. Dont spend a disproportionate amount on a single component. For current and future games I would make sure you have at least 4 gigs of RAM any less and your graphics card and processor will suffer. Games that you described are memory hogs (especially supreme commander)
Get a video card with at least 512 Mb memory. Any less and your wasting money because it will be obsolete rather quickly. compatibility is based on your motherboard so check the card manufacturers and motherboard manufacturers sites.

logan054
14-01-2009, 19:08
http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=224702

I found this graphic card was very good for the money, i can run most games on max settings., mesh computers are also cheaper than dabs on most bits.

giner
21-01-2009, 14:42
I just found that I need a low-profile card because of a stupid difference in shell size. Just wondering if you can advise any? (Its a PCI slot)

EDIT: Thanks Gjork, I do mean PCI-e.

WLBjork
21-01-2009, 16:27
I hope you mean PCI-e there giner.

If it really is PCI then I'd say it's past time for a new system.

giner
23-01-2009, 16:07
I ended up ordering an 8400GS from Play, their own brand. 512MB card for 30, it should be compatible, the same card from XFX is.:)

The only annoying thing is I have to wait for them to get stock, says 4-5 days so its all good.