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MooCow
01-01-2008, 04:04
Well, I have been reading the Czech Cabbage, and I have been thinking about different Foods from countires all around the world. With a little Parental Permisson, We will be able to eat some-other food than boring Middle U.S.A Blah.

So, asking you, Fellow Warseers, what would be a Good first (International) dish to try? Ex. Something from Russia, Germany, Etc, etc.
If you can give the Dish name, then country of Orgin, I'd be much apperciated. Even, I can post how the meal went!

Thanks all,
Moocow

Edit: Go ahead with anything,

Strikerkc
01-01-2008, 04:33
Haggis, Scotland. God-speed

pwrgmrguard
01-01-2008, 04:59
He said he didn't want saurkraut and you think he'd go for that?

Leberkase, Germany. Tastes a bit like baloney but it's in thk baked slices, and you eat it with a fried egg on top. Sooooo good, and it's an american's opinion of another culture's fare. Actually....all foreign food is better than american food...damn. I need to move to europe.

MooCow
01-01-2008, 05:02
He said he didn't want saurkraut and you think he'd go for that?


Well, I don' think I'd gobble Haggis up like there is no tommorow, but given the chance I'd love a taste of it. Saurkraut, Looking again, I'd try to eat, so I wouldn't be such a close minded Person

The UnNamed One
01-01-2008, 05:25
Currywurst, from germany, hot pork sausages with a tomato curry sauce and curry powder. Its good.
also:
Satay, Indonesia?. slices of dice-sized meat (chicken, mutton, beef, pork, fish, etc.) on skewers. These are grilled over a fire, then served with various spicy seasonings.

pwrgmrguard
01-01-2008, 05:38
I can attest to currywurst being good. and the sauerkraut thing is it's just cabbage. you eat it on reubens. now there's a sandwich.

Penitent
01-01-2008, 05:45
Satay, Indonesia?. slices of dice-sized meat (chicken, mutton, beef, pork, fish, etc.) on skewers. These are grilled over a fire, then served with various spicy seasonings.

I think a variety of South-Asian countries have their own versions of Satay. I've had Thai Chicken Satay with a peanut sauce; delectable.

Give Bul-gogi a try. Its a Korean marinated beef dish, very tasty with no ingredients that would be foreign to a Western palate.

On the western side, I'm a big fan of meat pies, which I believe is a British specialty.

Nephilim of Sin
01-01-2008, 08:53
I have to second that the best way to being introduced to 'Kraut is through a Reuben. It is one of the best sandwiches you can ever get, and so long as you venture into a respectable deli, you can find one done right. Then, you will get the craving for sauerkraut.

Now, while it is not 'another country', don't forget that each region of the U.S. has it's own distinct flavor, not usually recognized fully in the midwest (from experience). I'll tell you right now, you haven't experience 'flavor pleasure' until you have sucked the brains out of a craw-dawd's head! Throw in some real Naw'lins gumbo and you are set! But, if you reckon spicy is not to your qualms, then perhaps it is best to stay from that particular delicacy.

Okay, traditional southern aside, what part of the midwest do you live in? For, that can really affect the style of food presented to you. Every region has it's own 'traditional yet foreign' cuisine. A nice shepard's pie would extend your palette with known ingredients, while their is always sushi (although only Kroger carries the 'store-bought' style that is slightly worth it).

I am just saying, don't forget to look around close to you, because 'American' food is only an amalgamation of the cuisine of other countries. While not secular, you can find a variety that is familiar, yet different at the same time.

Jo Bennett
01-01-2008, 09:06
I don't know what you consider to be boring mid USA food, but have you tried toad in the hole? It takes a little practise to get it just right but it tastes so good...

RobC
01-01-2008, 12:41
It depends on what you consider 'normal' food. An American friend of mine always complained about how limited our choice of food was in the UK, because back home he was used to a range of Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, Thai and Spanish dishes.

Are there any kinds of restaurants you've not tried, as a starter? Even if you eat Italian every so many weeks, it's possible someone native could suggest an authentic dish that you wouldn't normally get in a US-based Italian restaurant.

Off the top of my head, I'd suggest you investigate some of the regional Spanish dishes. My personal favourites are Espinicas con Garbanzos (spinach with chickpeas) and Pimientos de Padron, a Galician plate of fried peppers with a few chili peppers thrown in to make it a little more unpredictable. Makes a great snack to accompany a drinking session!

MooCow
01-01-2008, 18:25
Well, when I say Mid-U.S.A food for my family, we are as un-imagitive about dishes as it comes. Mainly Chicken ( grilled in some way) Beef (burgers, steaks etc) And Pork ( That comes to be something more inventive than what we eat, but meh) all followed by Salad. So,uh, we suck.

I am thinking of getting sauerkraut defintaly, but from what I read maybe I shouldn't eat much so quickly? Something about the stomach that hasn't been introduced to that food will react badly.

I will probaly eventually try most of what is listed, It all depends on if and when we go to our International Food Market.

Groksnag
01-01-2008, 18:29
Yakisoba, Japanese.

addictingly good

heretics bane
01-01-2008, 20:11
Traditional irish stew.

Tastes great,fills the belly and its easy to make. Ill PM you the ingredients if you want it?

nazrag
01-01-2008, 20:26
Well there is some interesting stuff from Norway..
-"Smalahove"; sheeps head, quite tasty though it sounds nasty
-"Lutefisk"; rotten fish in amonia ;)

Other than the weird stuff, I'd recommend most of the sutff the germans make, they know their food :)

Hicks
01-01-2008, 20:38
A poutine is a local fast-food dish. It's super easy to make, just fill a bowl with fries, had a bunch of fresh cheeze curds and cover it all with a hot brown gravy. Personaly I had vinegar, ketchup and pepper to it.

Don't eat it too often though, or you'll have a heart attack. Taken before or after a drinking session is also a sure way to reduce or eliminate next day's hung over... god I wish I had one yesterday.

Tom20
07-01-2008, 15:04
from finland hk sinen or mämmi or kallakukko.

Typheron
07-01-2008, 15:05
Haggis, Scotland. God-speed

Seconded, also try Black Pudding.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
07-01-2008, 15:17
Deep Fried Mars Bar.

Or Deep Fried Pizza...the true connesieurs taste of Scotland!

Or my personal favourite Stomach-Liner, ideal before a night on the Pop....

1 Portion of Singapore Fried Rice, 1 large Bowl, two pots of Curry Sauce, mix it up in the bowl, grab a Fork, or Spork, if your thus inclined, and enjoy!

pookie
07-01-2008, 15:27
Seconded, also try Black Pudding.

now i cant agree with this as it turns my stomach,

but it did bring to mind, Dripping, which i also cant stand, but people in my family ( the weird parental unit - mum, loves the stuff)

Andyalloverdaplace
07-01-2008, 17:04
Easy ones:

Green Onion Cake, usually found in the freezer section, but it's basically dough with green onions in, served with Soy Sauce and hot sauce on the side.
Poutine, seconded, I like mine with Green onions on top.
Donair, the recipie for the meat can be found on line. Imagine a spicy lunch meat sandwich, heated, served on a pita instead of a piece of bread.
Pyrohy, ukrainian potato dumplings, served with grilled onions and bacon bits, found in the freezer section if you are lucky. Serve with Kolbassa (ukrainian sausage).
Bison Meat: Cook as you would extra lean ground beef. About as organic as you can get (bison eat what they want, and you won't find many farmers who are going to try and jab one with a needle).
BBQ Turkey: All sorts of Recipies on the net
Yakitori: Chicken breasts, seasoned, put on sticks with leeks (I think). The Japanese love these.
Carne Asada: Steak, marinaded in lime juice, chipotle peppers, oregano, and garlic. The meat cooks as it marinades, getting you very tender steaks after you cook them, although they will appear well done, even cooking as you would medium rare. (William Sonoma)

For a good set of recipies, I recommend "How To Grill" by Stephen Raichen. Lots of good old american food recipies, as well as some adventurous fare and clear instructions with plenty of step by step pictures. Includes how to smoke a turkey (they are hard to keep lit), yakitori, Pizza on the BBQ, Creme brule, as well as about 100 other recipies. The extra benefit of this is the ingrediants list is written for the american consumer, so you can find the stuff at a normal supermarket.

Mild curry recipies over rice are also easy to make, reasonably priced and if you find you like them, can be a good thing to learn to make for when you go to college. Same with Chow mein and chinese rice dishes.


Good, and good eating

alexh
07-01-2008, 19:48
Parmo, Middlesbrough. If you eat more than one a week you need to move in to a coronary care ward

thegnome
07-01-2008, 22:20
Ratatouille, France. Either as the traditional stew or a layered version (http://smittenkitchen.com/2007/07/rat-a-too-ee-for-you-ee/) inspired by the movie. Incredibly simple (and fun, if it's the layered) to make, and it's very filling. Have some the next morning with a poached egg on top.

Part of making food interesting isn't just trying out new regions, though. Try experimenting with adding some ingredients or altering recipes. If regular pasta is boring, try mixing it with some wilted spinach, steamed rapini (broccoli raab) or halved cherry tomatoes. A nice trick I've picked up is, after straining the cooked pasta, toss it in the saucepan with the greens, some fresh herbs (basil or oregano), tomato or meatballs. This helps flavour the pasta, instead of just adding something on top of it. With salads, try different greens such as arugula, chard, radicchio, or beet leaves. Even better, make up your own dressing. Experiment all you like, just remember an approximate 3:1 oil:acid ratio. Vinegars or citrus juices are your best bets for the acid. Toss in something like garlic, basil, red chilies, mustard or yogurt (remember, you only need a very small amount with the last two), or anything else you think will go nicely with each other.

Don't overwhelm yourself, so start off simple and work your way up. Write down what you do in a notebook, as well as how it turns out and what you might do differently the next time. Above all else, have fun! If you're going to be stuck in the kitchen for a half hour or more, you should enjoy it!

Zink
07-01-2008, 22:38
I've had haggis and didn't mind it. Ludefisk on the other hand... you trying to kill him or something? I guess it's been to long since the ancestors left Norway for me to get into that dish. I lived in russia for quite awhile and married a russian lady. I could even send you recipes of these if you're interested.

I like blini, like a french crepe or a very flat pancake.
Vareniki(commonly calle perogies in Canada but that's the polish name), usually potato and cheese inside a doughy crust that's boiled or fried. Can have fruit as well.
Pelmeni, the same dough as the vareniki but with meat and smaller. Similar to ravioli.
There's a variety of interesting salads.
I've got a great recipe for crab pizza.
There's also myaco po kapitanski. Basically a steak cooked in the oven with a thin layer of onions, potatoes and cheese on top. Maybe mayonnaise as well. A lot of russian dishes have mayonnaise.

Those are some of the one we do regularly.

Misfratz
07-01-2008, 23:23
One thing that I picked up after visiting Greece, where we had a lot of salad, was to add a wider variety of ingredients to such a thing. Feta cheese (strongly flavoured goats cheese) is particularly nice, also chopped up bits of salami.

At this time of year I find that I can't go wrong with a simple baked potato, buried under masses of cheese and with beans and tuna to the side. Simple, but good.

Scanno
08-01-2008, 13:51
Parmo, Middlesbrough. If you eat more than one a week you need to move in to a coronary care ward

Is that the deep fried breaded chicken with cheese one? Had something my GF called 'chicken parmesan' in NY which was very similar, breaded chicken cutlets baked under mozerella and homemade tomato sauce.

Gotta say I second the Irish stew, or a full Irish breakfast; nothing like half a pig processed in different ways and dipped in oil to get you going.

Jedi152
08-01-2008, 15:28
Britain - or at least England: Full English breakfast.

Sausage, bacon (ours isn't crispy like yours), baked beans, a fried egg (sunny side up i think you call it), hash browns, black pudding, fried mushrooms, toast on the side and a mug of tea.

Serve with HP sauce (you might be able to get some over there). Beautiful, but don't have more than one a month! :D

Also (google for good recipes):
Shepard's Pie (minced lamb and vegetables in gravy with a mashed potato topping - the same thing with beef is called Cottage Pie),
Roast beef with Yorkshire puddings and all the trimmings,

Mad Doc Grotsnik
09-01-2008, 11:21
Hash Browns? English Brekkie? I don't think so young man!

Wheres your tinned tomato? Wheres your Fried Bread?

Honestly, the yoof of today! :p

But yes, English Breakfast for the win!

Tonberry
09-01-2008, 11:35
Fish and chips, but out of a newspaper, none of this plate nonsense.

Jedi152
09-01-2008, 12:10
Hash Browns? English Brekkie? I don't think so young man!

Wheres your tinned tomato? Wheres your Fried Bread?

Honestly, the yoof of today! :p

But yes, English Breakfast for the win!
Cheeky sod! I'm only about 6 months younger than you! :p

Tomatoes? No way. Can't stand the things. Beans it is. I love hash browns! Anything to shoehorn some potato into a meal.

I thought of mentioning fried bread, but thought it was one heart attack too many. We don't want the rest of the world thinking we're unhealthy buggers do we? :D

I'm glad you didn't contest brown sauce. The lowest depths of hell are reserved for those who put red sauce on a full English or bacon sandwich.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
09-01-2008, 12:19
Has to be soft white bread (like Kingsmill Gold) with fresh, spreadable butter, Bacon straight from the pan, and then a good dollop of HP.

Food of Kings that.

alexh
09-01-2008, 12:30
I thought of mentioning fried bread, but thought it was one heart attack too many. We don't want the rest of the world thinking we're unhealthy buggers do we? :D

We are unhealthy, just not as unhealthy as the Americans.

superknijn
09-01-2008, 12:53
Meh. English breakfast would be okay if it didn't include all the damn beans! Every single day! And, if you didn't watch out, they'd give you beans during lunch as well, not too mention the portion of baked beans you'll inevitably get stuffed down your throat in the evenings.

Ofcourse, that was during Camp Downe, and you can somewhat expect to be buried by cheap but healthy food during a Scout camp.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
09-01-2008, 12:59
Ooooh....A Blood'n'Foetus Roll!

For this you will need....

One soft yolked Fried Egg.
One fried slice of Black Pudding
One floury roll (yes, the floury is important to the taste) lightly butter
One dollop of HP.

Put it together, and consume...congratulations, you are now officially top of the food chain!

Deamon-forge
09-01-2008, 13:14
Has to be soft white bread (like Kingsmill Gold) with fresh, spreadable butter, Bacon straight from the pan, and then a good dollop of HP.

Food of Kings that.

I agree nothing better after you beeen on the drink all night to wake up to one of these in the morning pricless!

Jedi152
09-01-2008, 13:18
I prefer a sausage cob myself, but i'll agree with you on that. Nothing makes your belly feel better after a night on the ale.

iFelix
09-01-2008, 13:25
For desert (from the UK)

Dead Man's Leg

or

Spotted Dick

Both served with custard.

Starscream1138
09-01-2008, 13:37
One of the most awesome meals of all time is Scouse Pie, with Gravy. I'm happy to go into detail for anyone who's interested and doesn't know what it is. Suffice to say though, it's the opposite of healthy.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
09-01-2008, 13:56
For desert (from the UK)

Dead Man's Leg

or

Spotted Dick

Both served with custard.

What? No Rice Pudding with Jam? Is lovely!

Andyalloverdaplace
09-01-2008, 15:18
For dessert, I'd counter with the following:

Crepes, served with strawberries, blueberries, or any other type that turns your crank and whipped cream. Easy to make. As many variations as you can imagine.

or a French Canadian Favorite, Sugar PIE!!! Take brown sugar, flour, whipped cream, and a dash of vanilla, in a pie shell. It looks a little like pumpkin pie, but it tastes like pecan pie without the pecans. Warning, if feeding to small children, tie them down first, comments about advanced civilizations turning into pure energy most likely involve having had too much of this pie. Serve with a little extra cream poured over top if you like.

Another French Canadian special is a sugaring off. Take real maple syrup (not maple flavoured, the real thing) find a convenient snow bank (clean, very important that) and pour the syrup on the snow. It hardens to taffy, and you can have a lot of fun with it.

Custard is actually a good suggestion as well, and custard powder is easy to come by. Follow the instructions on the container for a custard dessert, adding berries if you like.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
09-01-2008, 15:28
Ooooh...Eton Mess!

For this, you will need Clotted Cream, fresh, English Strawberries, Meringues, and sugar.

Bung it all in a bowl, and mix it up. Grab spoon, consume. Belch loudly in sugary satisfaction.

Andyalloverdaplace
09-01-2008, 16:04
One that the OPs mom would probably approve of is Christmas Morning Wifesaver. Basically ham, bread, cheese, and eggs as a casserole, made the night before and baked on Christmas morning while the turkey is being prepared. A very common dish, practically everyone I mention it to has it as a holiday standard. The Best of the Best of Bridge cookbook has it, but I'm sure there are versions on the net.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
09-01-2008, 16:12
For traditional British Cookery...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Maw-Broons-Cookbook-Every-Special/dp/1902407458/ref=pd_sim_b_title_1

MooCow
09-01-2008, 20:56
Well, I am pleased to see all the Comments on the topic, today I am to go to a Local Bookstore and maybe pick up a few Recipe Books, otherwise, Sometime (Hopefully) I'll go to my local Internatioinal food Market and try to pick up some stuff. We have a large portion off this week (and next!) of so I will be able to do more of these Breakfast Items rather than Dinner/Lunch.

I've convinced my parents to help make Permo and maybe Rattatouile(sp?) and the Wifesaver We have already tried Satay and I liked it a lot, defiantly something I want to eat more.

Although what do you mean by the Bacon not crispy, As in, only cook it for a short amount of time? Or is there a secert Bristish-only Pig breeding area for no crispery bacon?

Neknoh
09-01-2008, 21:28
Grab some ground-meat (same stuff you use to make home-made burgers), add some egg, some union and roll it into balls. Fry the balls.

Serve with mashed potatoes, lingon-berry-jam, your typical brown sauce (often with cream in it I think) and some inlaid (NOT pickled, pickled = sweet) cucumber.

I present to you a dish of swedish meatballs with mashed potatoes (do note, use real potatoes and shy away from powder). I'll see if I can find an actual recepie

Andyalloverdaplace
09-01-2008, 22:00
Five Roses flour has been printing a cookbook for about 130 years or so, which is very complete. Everything from how to make basic white sauce to Lac St. Jean Tortiere (which requires a duck, some rabbits, and about 2 days prep time). The ingredient lists are normally the sort of thing you could buy at any grocery store. It also has selection guides for vegetables, various meats, including wild game and seafood. It was aimed originally at rural housewives who wouldn't have access to more exotic dishes, but might see the odd rabbit hop across the garden.

I'd pick it up or something equal for when you move out, and practice. I think you need to go online to get it, I've never seen it in the stores.

cpl_hicks
09-01-2008, 22:16
Probebly something you wont like, but ive always wanted to try Bulls testicles.

thearchiver
09-01-2008, 23:20
Kangaroo, or croc is the way to go.

This site should help out a lot, it breaks everything down so you can browse away by nationality, cooking method and ingredient.
http://www.fooddownunder.com/

Hicks
10-01-2008, 04:21
Probebly something you wont like, but ive always wanted to try Bulls testicles.

:wtf::eek::eyebrows: OK people, I'm sorry for taking up your time, but I need to make an announcement. The above comment was made by cpl_hicks, not to be mistaken with the other poster who goes by the name Hicks, the non testicle eating one.

Thanks all for your time

thegnome
10-01-2008, 07:36
I thought we just made up the idea of the "prairie oyster," the bull testicle, to make us seem tougher than Eastern Canada...

alexh
10-01-2008, 09:24
Although what do you mean by the Bacon not crispy, As in, only cook it for a short amount of time? Or is there a secert Bristish-only Pig breeding area for no crispery bacon?

Yes, only cook the bacon for a short time.

Jedi152
10-01-2008, 09:58
Although what do you mean by the Bacon not crispy, As in, only cook it for a short amount of time? Or is there a secert Bristish-only Pig breeding area for no crispery bacon?
Well from my experiences, Americans tend to prefer what we would call thin cut streaky bacon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Bacon.jpg), and fry it until it's really crispy.

In the UK we tend to use thicker cut back bacon (http://www.broadstripebutchers.co.uk/resources/i.aspx?p=/Product/uncookedImage/9989/ProductRotatingImage/Bacon%20Raw.jpg) (i think you guys call it Canadian bacon) and cook it for less time.

Mad Doc Grotsnik
10-01-2008, 10:04
And if I see anyone pouring bloody maple syrup on their fry up, instead of the traditional, and indeed, necessary, Brown sauce, there will be trouble....

Oh, Bubble and Squeak is good. Essentially fry up the remnants of last nights Roast. Mmmmmm!

Andyalloverdaplace
10-01-2008, 13:47
Trust me, if they are pouring maple syrup on something like a drunken fry up, they are already hurting. It costs slightly more than a good scotch by volume (something like CDN $20 for a mickey), and a drunken fry up? It's an insult to the syrup. Now, on pancakes, french toast, waffles, crepes, or even vanilla ice cream, that's the biscuit.

Zink
10-01-2008, 14:21
The prairie oyster used to be eating a fair bit around here and just west of us. Ranch country in SW Sask. I don't know anybody that regularly eats them nowadays although I have in the past just to prove that I would. Not bad if cooked properly but not really my thing.

Arkzein
10-01-2008, 14:35
Thirded on the Irish stew, I've spent years trying to make it like my grandmother and not quite getting there.

From Northern Ireland there is the full Ulster fry. Sausage, bacon, mushrooms, black pudding, white pudding, potato bread, soda bread, fried bread, fried tomato, beans. Odd time scrabled eggs, fried mince (like mini-burgers), fried onions, cabbage, turnip, gammon, potato skins. Have it with a cup of tea and some nice buttery white bread. Yes I think only Scotland one ups us on heart disease. ;)

Oh and croned beef and cabbage is just what americans seem to think is traditional Irish. (though there is a bacon and cabbage dish)

Drink wise there's Irish coffee and Poteen (which has recently been made legal again and I think can be exported, however anything stronger than 80% is banned by the EU IIRC)

Oh and as an aside in Greece I had a dish known as Kleftiko (sort of a lamb hot pot with feta cheese) delicious that was.

Grazzy
10-01-2008, 18:05
Try simple italian pastas and indian curries. They are quite simple - just rice/pasta with a sauce.

heretics bane
10-01-2008, 19:49
Thirded on the Irish stew, I've spent years trying to make it like my grandmother and not quite getting there.

From Northern Ireland there is the full Ulster fry. Sausage, bacon, mushrooms, black pudding, white pudding, potato bread, soda bread, fried bread, fried tomato, beans. Odd time scrabled eggs, fried mince (like mini-burgers), fried onions, cabbage, turnip, gammon, potato skins. Have it with a cup of tea and some nice buttery white bread. Yes I think only Scotland one ups us on heart disease. ;)

Oh and croned beef and cabbage is just what americans seem to think is traditional Irish. (though there is a bacon and cabbage dish)

Drink wise there's Irish coffee and Poteen (which has recently been made legal again and I think can be exported, however anything stronger than 80% is banned by the EU IIRC)

Oh and as an aside in Greece I had a dish known as Kleftiko (sort of a lamb hot pot with feta cheese) delicious that was.


Ahh good old Ulster fry my ideal hang over food! as for poteen, holy damn! that stuff's strong!! makes you go blind after a while of drinking it.

Inquisitor_Matt
10-01-2008, 20:21
Easy ones:

Donair, the recipie for the meat can be found on line. Imagine a spicy lunch meat sandwich, heated, served on a pita instead of a piece of bread.



My host student took me to a Donair Kebob shop in Seligenstadt when I was in Germany. Donair is what God eats. It is lamb cooked on a vertical rotisserie that is put on this flat bread that has a inside and a crispy flaky crust (It must be Manna from Heaven). Then lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, red cabbage, and this increasable garlic sauce. I'm getting teary-eyed just thinking about it.

Sauerkraut is fantastic to cook sausage with or to eat alone. Throw it on Brats, burgers, hot dogs, whatever.

Andyalloverdaplace
10-01-2008, 20:33
My host student took me to a Donair Kebob shop in Seligenstadt when I was in Germany. Donair is what God eats. It is lamb cooked on a vertical rotisserie that is put on this flat bread that has a inside and a crispy flaky crust (It must be Manna from Heaven). Then lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, red cabbage, and this increasable garlic sauce. I'm getting teary-eyed just thinking about it.

Sauerkraut is fantastic to cook sausage with or to eat alone. Throw it on Brats, burgers, hot dogs, whatever.

The donair shops up this way use pitas for the bread, and the sauce is probably Tadziki sauce, very simple to make, basically plain yoghurt, dill, cucumbers, and one or two other common items. The Garlic was probably in the meat, they really season that. Some shops also make a Chicken donair (same spices, but using chicken breasts).

superknijn
10-01-2008, 21:04
My host student took me to a Donair Kebob shop in Seligenstadt when I was in Germany. Donair is what God eats. It is lamb cooked on a vertical rotisserie that is put on this flat bread that has a inside and a crispy flaky crust (It must be Manna from Heaven). Then lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, red cabbage, and this increasable garlic sauce. I'm getting teary-eyed just thinking about it.

Well, it's what the God-Emperor probably ate, as he's from Turkey.
Here in the Netherlands, and Germany as well, we're kinda being flooded by Turkish Doner/Döner bars, most of which rather cheap establishments, using meat that should've been thrown away. Some of them are good, however, and there, the food's delicious. And besides, it's always nice to see immigrants making a living by enhancing our tastes.

Inquisitor_Matt
10-01-2008, 21:21
The donair shops up this way use pitas for the bread, and the sauce is probably Tadziki sauce, very simple to make, basically plain yoghurt, dill, cucumbers, and one or two other common items. The Garlic was probably in the meat, they really season that.


That makes sense, I looked up recipes for it and it include lots of garlic, so mystery solved.



I agree with you superknijn, we have a large Hmong population where I live. They have an interesting culture and great food. Hmong New Year is great here because families come from all over the state and country to celebrate. They have a big celebration in one of the city parks and lots of food booths. :D

Jedi152
11-01-2008, 07:11
The donair shops up this way use pitas for the bread, and the sauce is probably Tadziki sauce, very simple to make, basically plain yoghurt, dill, cucumbers, and one or two other common items. The Garlic was probably in the meat, they really season that. Some shops also make a Chicken donair (same spices, but using chicken breasts).
Tsatziki does indeed have shed loads of garlic in it, as i found when i went to Greece.


My host student took me to a Donair Kebob shop in Seligenstadt when I was in Germany. Donair is what God eats. It is lamb cooked on a vertical rotisserie that is put on this flat bread that has a inside and a crispy flaky crust (It must be Manna from Heaven). Then lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, red cabbage, and this increasable garlic sauce. I'm getting teary-eyed just thinking about it.
I hope it's nicer than the British doner, which is pretty horrible, and only eaten by drunk people on their way home from the pub.

thegnome
11-01-2008, 18:48
I agree, you've gotta be careful. There's a place here called The Moonlight Diner that makes the most fantastic donairs (and other middle eastern food) I've ever had, but I had one from my local pizza place last night and it was horrible: small, wasn't folded shut, the sauce just poured out of it (as did ingredients) and the bottom of it was slick with watery sauce. No extra vegetables, just soggy tomatoes and onions.