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Chaos Mortal
12-02-2008, 16:01
if you guess a distance for a cannon and its bounce is in a lake or river does the shot get lost in the water or bounce like it normally would? I dont think there is anything specifyed as to what would happen but it would seem common sense that the shot dosent bounce?

has anyone else had this scenario pop up before? and if so how did you resolve it? we played that it bounced as it would normally so im just checking if we got it right?

Thanks, Chaos Mortal

Shamfrit
12-02-2008, 16:11
Reserved in case I find it...

But on another note...

Damn Busters? Seen it?

Wow, actually, that's a good question, let me have a poke around.

Chaos Mortal
12-02-2008, 16:14
yes i have seen it its a good movie and thanks =) neither of us had come across it before, on one hand i cant recall ever seeing that the cannon ball gets lost but on the other hand it makes sense for it to get lost lol. It jusy got me thinking =P.

Kelend
12-02-2008, 16:16
Rules specifically say that impassable terrain that would stop a cannon ball in real life would stop it in the game... like a cliff face (as opposed to a lake).

I had to read this twice. I would swear that a cannon ball hitting a lake would go splash and sink... but as the book specifically states that lakes don't stop cannon balls.

Go Figure

(Page 87, second to last paragraph, BRB)

Chaos Mortal
12-02-2008, 16:21
the lake was very difficult terrain in the game lol we had rolled on it at the atart but it made sense that it would splash. Thanks for the reference.

DeathlessDraich
12-02-2008, 16:22
1) Players are meant to ascribe properties to terrain before the battle - whether it is impenetrable, difficult etc..

2) The 2 requirements needed have been mentioned by Kelend - 1) impenetrable 2) stopped in real life.
If the lake is deemed to be impenetrable, then it would stop the cannonball bounce since in real life it could do that.

Chaos Mortal
12-02-2008, 18:09
thanks for the relies i was interested to hear what other people thought.

Thanks, Chaos Mortal

Nurgling Chieftain
12-02-2008, 20:03
It's worth noting that in real life, fast-moving cannonballs striking water at a sharp angle will tend to "bounce" or skip rather than simply splashing in. In fact, at close range, warships intentionally "skipped" cannonballs across the water to hit enemy ships as close to the waterline as possible.

So, it's not especially unrealistic at all, except maybe at long ranges; but at long ranges cannonballs would tend to get stuck in earth, too.

Shamfrit
12-02-2008, 20:09
It's worth noting that in real life, fast-moving cannonballs striking water at a sharp angle will tend to "bounce" or skip rather than simply splashing in. In fact, at close range, warships intentionally "skipped" cannonballs across the water to hit enemy ships as close to the waterline as possible.

So, it's not especially unrealistic at all, except maybe at long ranges; but at long ranges cannonballs would tend to get stuck in earth, too.

This is precisely what I was getting at with the Damn Busters reference, it's not impossible for a cannon ball to skip water.

505
12-02-2008, 20:34
its like skipping a rock across the lake :D

Conotor
12-02-2008, 22:10
Also, the bounce could be taken to mean "this is where the cannonball is at a hight where it can hit things".

T10
12-02-2008, 22:18
I'm no expert, but it would seem that a cannonball following a fairly flat trajectory would be more likely to bounce on water than on denser/more resistant soil.

-T10

Chaos Mortal
13-02-2008, 11:03
i suppose whenever you think about it it seems more likely that it would skip across water than the ground in some cases anyway.

Thanks, Chaos Mortal

Braad
13-02-2008, 18:45
Actually, I believe I read somewhere that in WWII they used to 'skip' bombs over lakes to destroy dams. By skipping, they avoided anti-air defense for flying missiles, and anti-torpedo nets for submerged attacks.
I even heard that the mathematical formula's describing this are top-secret because of this.

But I could be wrong...

Though it should be possible for the bomb to skip across the water. Maybe roll a d6, and on 1-3 it sinks and on 4+ it goes on.

Nurgling Chieftain
14-02-2008, 07:35
Maybe roll a d6, and on 1-3 it sinks and on 4+ it goes on.I prefer, roll an artillery die, on a misfire it sinks, on any other result it skips that many inches. ;)

kroq'gar
14-02-2008, 07:41
Actually, I believe I read somewhere that in WWII they used to 'skip' bombs over lakes to destroy dams. By skipping, they avoided anti-air defense for flying missiles, and anti-torpedo nets for submerged attacks.



Why is everyone missing the dam busters reference...

its a famous bombing run where this very mission happened, made into a movie.

T10
14-02-2008, 08:38
It is less famous for not actually featuring a cannon.

-T10

Conotor
14-02-2008, 11:43
Actually, I believe I read somewhere that in WWII they used to 'skip' bombs over lakes to destroy dams. By skipping, they avoided anti-air defense for flying missiles, and anti-torpedo nets for submerged attacks.
I even heard that the mathematical formula's describing this are top-secret because of this.


I hink they gave thoes bobs a huge backspin to help them bounce, but that is likely only neccesarry beacuse they are "dropppong" them, so they hit the watter at a lerger angle.

Braad
14-02-2008, 16:18
I prefer, roll an artillery die, on a misfire it sinks, on any other result it skips that many inches. ;)

Good one. Stick to this, and you can't go wrong :)

Chaos Mortal
15-02-2008, 11:33
sounds good although im not sure how common an event that is

neo_ebrick
16-02-2008, 07:46
yes the dam busters had a couple missions in wwII if you look up the history channel they have a special on the bouncing boms.