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omera
08-03-2008, 01:42
Reading the fluff of the Tyranid codex, I noticed that Kryptman was trying to work against the Tyranids for over 2 centuries. How is this possible for a human of the Imperium?

Guy Fawkes
08-03-2008, 01:52
30,000 years into the future I would hope you could live a bit longer than you could today. There are a lot of procedures and items (that only the wealthiest citizens of the Imperium, including Govenors and Inquisitors, can afford) to extend one's life. Space Marines are a good example - although they can technically be classified as humans, they have much longer lifespans (among other things). Sometimes veterans campaign for many centuries and I don't think there is one Space Marine (besides possibly some of the Primarchs) who have died in peace. So far all Space Marines have been killed by someone else.

In the back of the Imperial Guard codex there is a little bit of fluff in one of the glossary entires on extending lifespans. It is entirely possible for very important humans to be kept alive much longer than Kryptmann has through artificial means.

Jonke
08-03-2008, 01:52
The imperium has several methods to prolong a persons life beyond what's normal. But it is only available to those in the topmost part of society (high-ranking officers and inquisitors as well as civilians in leading positions, planetary guvernors and such).

Tommygun
08-03-2008, 01:59
Isn't Chaplain Cassius of the Ultramarines supposed to be 700 or 800 years old? He is supposed to be the oldest in the chapter not counting the Dreadnoughts. I would also think heads of government or very rich people not exposed to combat might even live longer.

centy
08-03-2008, 02:01
DAnte is about 1000 years old.
Not bad for a raving looney

Inquisitor Engel
08-03-2008, 04:37
DAnte is about 1000 years old.
Not bad for a raving looney

Umm... Dante is one of the most calm, collected and well rounded Space Marine Commanders in the Imperium. He knows when to attack, when to withdraw and when to feint. You can't get a much better rounded Commander than Dante. 1000 years of experience goes a long way.



Kryptman also spends a good deal of time in the Warp, skewing his own life in relationship to real time, in addition to the normal methods of mechanical and biological of life prolonging the Imperium uses, he might only appear 50.

sulla
08-03-2008, 05:09
Isn't Chaplain Cassius of the Ultramarines supposed to be 700 or 800 years old? He is supposed to be the oldest in the chapter not counting the Dreadnoughts. I would also think heads of government or very rich people not exposed to combat might even live longer.

Totally different things. Space marines would probably not even be classified as humans in this day and age.

But inquisitors and important dignitaries do have acces to the best tech the imperium has to offer. this can help extend their lifespan by a huge amount.

Space marines probably don't need any of that tech. their bodies just age better than humans... immunity to most diseases, extreme regeneration of damaged cells... most of the stuff that ages us simply doesn't effect them.

Progena
08-03-2008, 10:44
Juvenat drug treatments are the most common - if rather expencive - methods of extending the expected lifespan of a Human. If I remember correctly, they slow the aging process so that a person of 120 would look like he or she just passed thirty. Death cannot be stalled indefinatly however. I haven't seen examples of normal Humans going further than 300. At that point you'd have to turn to the Mechanicum where Imperial Crowns doesn't count as much as personal contacts. I would imagine that even an Imperial Planetary Governor would be sick of life after two hundred years in office.

And, I believe Dante has been Chapter Master of the Blood Angels for a millenia, which would make him a lot older than a 1000 years old. That is exceptional even for a Space Marine. One of the side effects of the Black Rage is that those who manage to stave it of have the potential to live to be many times the age of Space Marines of other Chapters. One should also note that Space Marines rarely, if ever, die of old age. Live by the gun, die by the gun.

Grand_Marshal_Kazan
08-03-2008, 12:32
DAnte is about 1000 years old.
Not bad for a raving looney

And if the Emperor can still be considered to be alive how old would he be now?

The Judge
08-03-2008, 14:39
If the background is to be believed Inquisitor Eisenhorn is meant to still be alive now... putting him somewhere near 7-800 years old.

I'm sure his meddling with Chaos might have something to do with that though...

heretics bane
08-03-2008, 14:42
Well about 18,000 years old? he was born 8k before the rise of the imperium.

Well dosnt eisenhorn not/is live for alot passed 300? 100 years to inquisitors is nothing.

And old Commodus Voke was nearly 400 if not passed that before he got fryed, and maybe even lord inquistor Roken(sp?)

The Venerable Archmage
08-03-2008, 15:38
I thought it wasn't 8000 years before the rise of the Imperium. I thought it was circa 8000 years BC, in Earth's prehistory, in ancient Anatolia, making him 48000 years old, give or take.

Leftenant Gashrog
08-03-2008, 16:46
I seem to recall that Eisenhorn has mention of Rejuvinat treatments which he and his closest associates would go through every century or so, to rejuvinate their bodies so they were in their prime.

Aeolian
08-03-2008, 17:22
The simple answer that applies to most of humanity in 40k is that in all probability, they are not the humans were are today.

They will be genetically different whether through through the deliberate enhancement or accidental change of their ancestors during the DAoT.

I consider Humans (by and large) in 40k to be more like the Numenoreans of Tolkein folklore. They can live far longer than modern humans.

El_Machinae
08-03-2008, 18:42
I agree with that. I forget how I came to the conclusion that ancient humans modified their genomes to have extended lives, but I think that's what was done. It's not all that unreasonable, either, because 'in the past' in 40k it would have been quite easy to change the human genome in such a way (heck, such technologies should be available for purchase in the 'real world' in the next 20-30 years or so).

Their current longevity is a side effect of their previous technology mastery.

Norminator
08-03-2008, 19:23
Is there any fluff on how juvenat treatments work, or what they are? They're mentioned frequently, but I've never heard any elaboration on them.

Apocalypse
08-03-2008, 20:09
Dante has been chapter master for 1100, and who knows how long one has to be alive and serve the chapter before becoming chapter master... So I think that goes to show how long someone can live for....
As for unaugmented humans, there are other ways of prolonging one's life... Stasis chambers, cybernetics, gene manipulation, etc....

Brother Siccarius
08-03-2008, 20:51
Is there any fluff on how juvenat treatments work, or what they are? They're mentioned frequently, but I've never heard any elaboration on them. There hasn't been any information on them yet, but some things suggested have been replacing organs with cloned ones, using youth-enhancing drugs, and even one corrupted imperial governor who had dark eldar flay him bit by bit, clean out the pieces, and put him back together...while he was alive...and awake for the most part.


The simple answer that applies to most of humanity in 40k is that in all probability, they are not the humans were are today.

They will be genetically different whether through through the deliberate enhancement or accidental change of their ancestors during the DAoT.

I consider Humans (by and large) in 40k to be more like the Numenoreans of Tolkein folklore. They can live far longer than modern humans.

Which is somewhat supported by the men of stone/men of gold theory, that humanity as it exists in 40k is more of an off-shoot of humanity as it exists today.

Tommygun
08-03-2008, 21:12
It's not all that unreasonable, either, because 'in the past' in 40k it would have been quite easy to change the human genome in such a way (heck, such technologies should be available for purchase in the 'real world' in the next 20-30 years or so).

I'll probable drop dead the day before it hits the market.

DantesInferno
08-03-2008, 22:35
...and even one corrupted imperial governor who had dark eldar flay him bit by bit, clean out the pieces, and put him back together...while he was alive...and awake for the most part.

I'm sorry, but which story in particular are you referring to here?

Norminator
08-03-2008, 23:08
I'm sorry, but which story in particular are you referring to here?

It was in Nightbringer, the first Ultramarines book.

Lord Cook
08-03-2008, 23:27
If the background is to be believed Inquisitor Eisenhorn is meant to still be alive now... putting him somewhere near 7-800 years old.

He's believed to still be alive throughout the Ravenor series, but remember that is also set several hundred years in the past as well. The Eisenhorn books end in 392.M41, so even if he is still alive at the end of the Ravenor trilogy, he's probably not more than 500 years old or so. And like you said, his methods by that point were hardly orthodox, so who knows what his lifespan will be.

I still hold sincere hopes Abnett will revisit Eisenhorn at some point.


I seem to recall that Eisenhorn has mention of Rejuvinat treatments which he and his closest associates would go through every century or so, to rejuvinate their bodies so they were in their prime.

I always got the impression it was a continual process, like brushing your teeth or exercising. Not a once-per-century affair.

The Judge
09-03-2008, 00:30
He's believed to still be alive throughout the Ravenor series, but remember that is also set several hundred years in the past as well. The Eisenhorn books end in 392.M41, so even if he is still alive at the end of the Ravenor trilogy, he's probably not more than 500 years old or so. And like you said, his methods by that point were hardly orthodox, so who knows what his lifespan will be.


I read that Abnett wrote Eisenhorn from his younger days until got older and injured enough to look like the one from the Inquisitor Rulebook (bald and crippled - leg braces) so that people could "continue his adventures" in the days after the books. Whether this goes up to the present (999.M41) is entirely up to us, I guess.

It doesn't mean that he is 800 years old, upon reflection, but it is an idea someone told me and I remembered as canon truth for some reason. Apologies all round!

That said... he ain't dead till I've seen the body.

BrainFireBob
09-03-2008, 06:29
There's also quasi-relativistic effects from Warp travel.

NerdyOgre254
09-03-2008, 06:36
Juvenat Treatment = Moisturiser + Steroids.
Simple as that.

Lord Malorne
09-03-2008, 10:06
In the Daemon hunters book it lists Eisenhorn and his exploits in 342.M35 page 58 bottom right second to last paragraph of the codex. yet the books say 240.M41....Hmm beautiful contradicitions! As for warp travel it would not effect your lifspan like staying out of the sun, time is just in a different state there, so there are no 10,000 year old chaos veterans...they are to us as 10,000 years have pased, but to them 10,000 years have not passed.

BrainFireBob
09-03-2008, 10:30
Correct, and it's deductions of Eisenhorn's age relative to the Terran reference frame being used to determine his age. Internal to the books, at the end of the trilogy, he mentions his age as being around 300, as I recall- despite the fact that he's "objectively" around 800.

Norminator
09-03-2008, 10:40
Correct, and it's deductions of Eisenhorn's age relative to the Terran reference frame being used to determine his age. Internal to the books, at the end of the trilogy, he mentions his age as being around 300, as I recall- despite the fact that he's "objectively" around 800.

But the end of the trilogy is not set in 999.M41, is it? I thought it was about 450.M41.

BrainFireBob
09-03-2008, 10:43
Yes, but even in-series, as I recall from reading it, Abnett's mentions of Eisenhorn's age and the "objective" year don't match- which means he was conscious of "warp travel" affecting your subjective vs. objective age.

Norminator
09-03-2008, 10:46
Yes, but even in-series, as I recall from reading it, Abnett's mentions of Eisenhorn's age and the "objective" year don't match- which means he was conscious of "warp travel" affecting your subjective vs. objective age.

Or just not very good at counting :p

BrainFireBob
09-03-2008, 21:27
I wouldn't be surprised, but I'll take consistent errors over deliberate destruction of existing fluff any day. ;-)

Brother Siccarius
10-03-2008, 00:11
Yes, but even in-series, as I recall from reading it, Abnett's mentions of Eisenhorn's age and the "objective" year don't match- which means he was conscious of "warp travel" affecting your subjective vs. objective age.

When you're popping in and out of the warp, I'm sure you'd get used to asking what year it is before anything else. Everyone and their dog who travels on a warp capable ship has heard tale of the time distortion. It's certainly reiterated in nearly every book on guardsmen, Marines, Inquisitors, or Rogue Traders. Abnett himself mentions it roughly every time you pop into the warp with Gaunt's Ghosts.