PDA

View Full Version : Moving in woods, quick question!



SilentTempest
03-05-2008, 08:31
If you have a cavalry unit, single rank, with its front edge on the edge of a woods, with the woods being a 2" thick strip, how many inches of movement is it to get to the point where your back edge is now just out of the forest. Is it:

A) About 8" of your movement, because your models will travel 4 inches with some part of their base being in the woods.

B) About 4" of your movement, because you're moving through 2" of woods, which then gets doubled to 4".

C) Something I haven't thought of.

I always thought it was A, but I had it questioned when a new guy tried to charge a cav unit through the corner of a woods which was about 2" at the thickest point he passed through (He has LOS past the edge of the woods, so that's not an issue).

Thanks for the help!

Falkman
03-05-2008, 08:50
Option A.
As long as you travel in difficult terrain you move at half speed, and you're still traveling through it if the rear part of the unit is in it.

Gazak Blacktoof
03-05-2008, 10:56
Option B.

As long as you travel in difficult terrain you move at half speed, and you're still traveling through it if the rear part of the unit is in it.

I'd say A. For the same reason as Falkman who's reasoning and response don't match.:p

xragg
03-05-2008, 11:43
6" of movement (assuming the base is a 1" square, which they arent)

It will cost you 4" of movement to get the front of your base from one edge of the woods to the next edge (2" of woods doubled). It will cost you another 2" (1" base doubled) to get the rest of the base out of the woods.

Edit: Oops, I just now noticed it said cavalry units. I would like to change my answer to 8", using the same logic.

DeathlessDraich
03-05-2008, 12:24
If you have a cavalry unit, single rank, with its front edge on the edge of a woods, with the woods being a 2" thick strip, how many inches of movement is it to get to the point where your back edge is now just out of the forest. Is it:

A) About 8" of your movement, because your models will travel 4 inches with some part of their base being in the woods.

B) About 4" of your movement, because you're moving through 2" of woods, which then gets doubled to 4".

C) Something I haven't thought of.



1) A unit (except Fast cavalry**) must maintain its formation while moving and every model cannot move more than its movement rate - pg 12

2) Therefore the distance moved by the unit as a whole will be affected by any model that moves more slowly relatively.

3) Troops in difficult terrain must move at half rate. - pg 16. Unfortunately the word model should have been here but any interpretation which does not assume this is practically unworkable.

4) Combining (1),(2) and (3), the whole unit moves at half rate as long as any part of any model's base is *moving* within difficult terrain.
- A unit that turns within woods does not suffer a further penalty.
- A unit that wheels with the 'outside' model not in woods should not suffer a movement penalty - but this is debatable.

In the case above, the distance moved at half rate = width of the woods + length (measured rankwise) of the unit

** It is possible for Fast cavalry to 'skirt' around woods.

Festus
03-05-2008, 12:38
Hi

So A it is: You pay 8" for moving a unit of 2" depth through 2" of wood, as the unit will need 4" to be clear of the woods. Double this for the M used.

Why Falkman says B is beyond me, though ... ;)
Festus

T10
03-05-2008, 12:43
If you consider the the unit to be moving through difficult terrain all the while at least part of any model in the unit is within it then the effective distance within the terrain is equal to the actual distance moved plus the length of the unit.

The rules do not go into detail on this issue, but the above is a pretty natural conclusion.

However, there are plenty of instances where movement is simply counted for the models in the first rank, and by "plenty" I mean "one": wheeling.

Wheeling assumes that it is sufficient to measure the movement performed by the outside model in the first rank, and when you think about it a bit you will realize that the most practical way to measure this distance is by the front edge of the base.

Set up a regiment of troops and you will notice how the models "slide" some-what as you perform the wheel.

Now, if you feel that terrain tends to bog down movement too much you might want to house-rule that you only pay extra movement for the actual stretch of difficult terrain, i.e. moving through 2" of wood costs 4" of movement regardless of the length of the unit.

It's not a perfect rule - it may prove unsatisfactory with regards to units only partially within terrain, but at least it doesn't require a degree in geometry to figure out how far a unit of knights can move through a shrubbery.

-T10

Falkman
03-05-2008, 13:59
Why Falkman says B is beyond me, though ... ;)
Festus
Sorry, I mixed up the options, I meant A of course :o

theunwantedbeing
03-05-2008, 16:50
Clearly A.
So long as your unit is touching the wood in some way it suffers the movement penalty.

Note you cannot march though woods with cavalry.