PDA

View Full Version : What was the inspiration for Magnus the Red?



Damage,Inc.
09-05-2008, 00:14
Well, title says it all really. I was reading up on the Philosopher's Stone last night and read this:

'According to legend, the 13th-century scientist and philosopher Albertus Magnus is said to have discovered the philosopher's stone and passed it to his pupil Thomas Aquinas, shortly before his death circa 1280. Magnus does not confirm he discovered the stone in his writings, but he did record that he witnessed the creation of gold by "transmutation."'



'it was reasoned that the transmutation of one metal into another could be effected by the rearrangement of its basic qualities. This change would presumably be mediated by a substance, which came to be called al-iksir in Arabic (from which the Western term "elixir" is derived). It is often considered to exist as a dry red powder made from a legendary stone the "philosopher's stone".'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophers_Stone

So, a 'Magnus' had found this stone that is 'Red' and had magical properties... Remind us of another red Magnus that knows about magick?

Koryphaus
09-05-2008, 01:43
Well, from www.Wikipedia.org:

"Many elements of the Thousand Sons' design, along with descriptions of the commune on Prospero, draw heavily on both Gnostic and Egyptian history and myth. The post-Heresy color scheme of the Legion, along with the design of the helmets worn by many of the ghost-Marines, was inspired by the burial mask of Tutankhamun.

It should also be noted that Angra Mainyu, the god from whom Ahriman's name is derived, is actually Persian in origin. Other influences may include the naming of the Primarch, the name of whom may have been a reference to Simon Magus - although early background descriptions and representations of Magnus stressed his monstrous, daemonic nature and appearance, rather than his former sorcerous studies. The council of Nikaea is slightly more obvious, drawing from the Christian First Council of Nicaea, whilst use of the Ouroboros is another link to gnostic symbolism." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnus_the_Red#Magnus_the_Red

Mechanicus
09-05-2008, 13:39
Simon Magnus seems to fit best, though elements of Albertus may have been put in as well.

pookie
09-05-2008, 14:54
as with most things GW the fluff/history is a mishmash of real history, with lots of bits taken and merged together, intresting question and a good read, sorry i cant be more helpful though.

Faustburg
09-05-2008, 14:59
Should be noted that "Magnus" is really not a name (well, it is nowadays), but really a tack on title meaning "the great"... look a little deeper and you will find dozens of those kind of Magnuses in history.

So Albertus Magnus is just really "Big Albert" in plain English.

Progena
09-05-2008, 16:01
Should be noted that "Magnus" is really not a name (well, it is nowadays), but really a tack on title meaning "the great"... look a little deeper and you will find dozens of those kind of Magnuses in history.

So Albertus Magnus is just really "Big Albert" in plain English.

Correct, Magnus is a simplification of the well known Roman honorific "Maximus", as far as I can tell.

I'm not a veteran of the grand old days of Rogue Trader, but I somehow doubt the dominant Egyptian theme was the basis of the first draft of the Thousand Sons. It seems it evolved into that. If you look at the Black Legion they also have several references to Egyptian mythology (Primarch Horus, the Eye of Horus).

Xandros
09-05-2008, 20:04
Originally Magnus the Red was depicted as a cyclops of greek mythology.

More recently artwork in the Horus Heresy books have depicted him as the Seth of egyptian mythology, god of chaos.

Alcibiades
09-05-2008, 22:19
Correct, Magnus is a simplification of the well known Roman honorific "Maximus", as far as I can tell.


Not a simplification. One is the superlative of the other: Maximus mean 'the greatest', Magnus means 'the Great'.

LordCypher
09-05-2008, 22:37
I'm pretty sure Magnus is his name. If Magnus was his title he'd have a first name like Pompae Magnus.

Woodrow_McWood
10-05-2008, 00:59
Another thing to consider is the name of their homeworld, Prospero. Which is also the name of one of the main characters in Shakespeare's The Tempest. He's a powerful sorcerer as well, but by the end of the play he decides to relinquish his powers and live happily ever after, while Magnus doesn't and this leads to the Thousand Son's downfall.

LordCypher
10-05-2008, 04:04
Another thing to consider is the name of their homeworld, Prospero. Which is also the name of one of the main characters in Shakespeare's The Tempest. He's a powerful sorcerer as well, but by the end of the play he decides to relinquish his powers and live happily ever after, while Magnus doesn't and this leads to the Thousand Son's downfall.

Exactly. It's an archtype. GW has always used real history in their Fluff. Looking too much in to it ruins the Fluff.

different13
10-05-2008, 06:47
I think it's about time someone repeated the Dark Angels = gay joke connection..

Woodrow_McWood
10-05-2008, 22:10
Exactly. It's an archtype. GW has always used real history in their Fluff. Looking too much in to it ruins the Fluff.

I couldn't disagree more, looking into the inspiration for the fluff can be very satisfying. Plus who knows what random connections one can make, even if they weren't intended by the author(s).

VenrableOne
10-05-2008, 22:29
as with most things GW the fluff/history is a mishmash of real history, with lots of bits taken and merged together, intresting question and a good read, sorry i cant be more helpful though.

This site (http://ca.geocities.com/crazy40kguy/namesandhomages.html) is a good one to see that.