PDA

View Full Version : 3 1/2 year old in Warhammer World



yeancientone
21-05-2008, 11:22
My nuclear family are off to Warhammer World on the weekend and I'm imagining our 3 1/2 year old son will be wanting to make a purchase. This is my opportunity to indoctrinate him with the core values of "The Hobby." I was thinking a handfull of snap-fit space marines - easy to paint and no glue required. Any other ideas? Is there anything you can buy at Warhammer World that you can't get anywhere else?

scarletsquig
21-05-2008, 11:29
Yeah, there's the bugman model that you can only buy at the bar.

It might be a bit too eatable for your kid though. :D

Bumble the Great
21-05-2008, 11:32
Are you sure that the hobby is sutable for a 3 1/2 year old??
as far as i knew gw staff members were told not to realy encourage parents of anyone under 10
I think its great that you have a hobby that you can share with your son, but at that age are you sure that he will be able to understand any of it and is it just a very expencive way of keeping a 3 1/2 year old entertained
Pease take no offence in this post as im am simply curious on your way of thinking on this matter and would love to hear a reply from you :)

yeancientone
21-05-2008, 11:43
I know it's unsuitable :D I guess it's just an excuse for me to buy more models :rolleyes: - but Eden (the 3 1/2 year old in question) has expressed an interest and does like to thumb through White Dwarf. We muck around with Heroscape and DnD minis too, so it's nothing new to him. Of course, spray cans, modelling knives and polystyrene cement are a no-no!

teh_soldier
21-05-2008, 11:47
That's it, sow the seeds of addiciton early, before his immune system (i.e. non-geekiness) has a chance to establish a defence, and we will have another to add to our ranks!

Anyhow, snap fits are a great idea, just don't go with the Ork ones (I can see those Choppas doing something nasty), but the Marines sound good. Get a picture of his first work when its done?

Bumble the Great
21-05-2008, 11:47
Oh for sure to be honest people still try to keep the sharp explodey stuff away from me!
It is just interesting on seeing a parents view on it(not being responcible enough for kids myself)

Osbad
21-05-2008, 11:52
My 5 year old and 7 year old are vets now, having collected and played LotR with me for 18 months or so! :)

There's nothing wrong with encouraging small kiddies to join in dad's hobby with him, its an excellent bonding opportunity! And provided you sell it that way to Mum, then if you play your cards right you may never ever have to spend Saturday shopping again....

"OK love, I'll look after the boys today while you go round the shops..." *evil grin*

I've been blogging about some of my experiences with my lads (who are LotR daft!) here:

http://www.thelastalliance.com/index.php?pid=viewblog&bloguser_id=469

Bumble the Great
21-05-2008, 11:54
then if you play your cards right you may never ever have to spend Saturday shopping again....

"OK love, I'll look after the boys today while you go round the shops..." *evil grin*

:

http://www.thelastalliance.com/index.php?pid=viewblog&bloguser_id=469


Now that is a plan :D

Jedi152
21-05-2008, 11:57
The only stuff you can buy exclusively there is indeed Bugman's Bar merchandise - but remember you can order stuff from direct and collect on the same day.

Don't forget to visit the cabinets upstairs with all of the 'Eavy Metal stuff in, and watch out for the orc head in the bar - it might be scary to a 3 year old...

shady
21-05-2008, 12:53
Re "the hobby". You might want to check out these rules for wargaming with Lego - Brick Battles, formerly known as lego wars. Though from memory (my kids are a little older now) the figures that can wear armour are aimed at 5 or so years up.

http://www.lugnet.com/gaming/~11/brickbattles

Warhammer World just has the Bugman's Mini as an exclusive, though it does stock specialist games, and you can order direct only models from the till. Or could when I was last there (before the abolition of bitz).

Gimp
21-05-2008, 13:06
My nuclear family are off to Warhammer World on the weekend and I'm imagining our 3 1/2 year old son will be wanting to make a purchase. This is my opportunity to indoctrinate him with the core values of "The Hobby." I was thinking a handfull of snap-fit space marines - easy to paint and no glue required. Any other ideas? Is there anything you can buy at Warhammer World that you can't get anywhere else?

By "core values" I hope you mean "having fun" and not "power gaming" :angel:

Other than than that its great to see a father enthusiastic about his children. Better than others I know :eyebrows:

yeancientone
21-05-2008, 13:10
I will post up a full photographic report when we return! Assuming my camera isn't seized by the Inquisition ...

slade the slaughter
21-05-2008, 14:11
Whilst I wouldn’t presume to tell you how to be a father
since am I not one myself.
I am slightly uneasy with the fact that you want your 3 year old son
to play a game that in it’s simplest form glamorizes war.

Please don’t take offence, but surly there are educational games
more suitable for a toddle to play?

yeancientone
21-05-2008, 14:42
There's more than enough hours in a child's day for education, fun and edu-fun. I haven't put brush to model in over a year: paint, glue and clippers don't get along with babies, and nor do fragile miniatures.

Whether Warhammer in its simplest form glamorises war or not could be the basis for a whole other thread ... I'd argue that it's a game of toy soldiers (admittedly a very involved game, but a game nonetheless). Obviously he won't be playing it until he can grasp the rules, assuming he actually wants to.

As for more educational pursuits, my view is that The Hobby (c)Jervis Johnson glamorises creativity, painting, modelling, social cooperation and mathematics.

Osbad
21-05-2008, 16:42
Whilst I wouldnít presume to tell you how to be a father
since am I not one myself.
I am slightly uneasy with the fact that you want your 3 year old son
to play a game that in itís simplest form glamorizes war.

Please donít take offence, but surly there are educational games
more suitable for a toddle to play?

To be honest, the earlier kids learn to tell the difference between reality and fantasy the better. Also, by learning about the gruesome side of the realities of war, even in a "fun/comic" way like in partnerhsip with a parent, arguably the child is more likely to grasp the reality of the harm conflict can cause, than if they were left to discover such things in their own way.

To be honest, most research indicates that children are very unlikely to gain a distorted view of violence, even from the most "dangerous" of sources (such as violent video games) provided they are given the opportunity to discuss their feelings and so forth with a responsible adult to takes close notice.

Therefore playing wargames with your dad is unlikely to cause any harm, whereas being left alone all day with "educational toys" is potentially disastrous. It is the guidance, not the toy that is important. One can foster responsible play with "dangerous" toys quite easily in a stable parenting environment.

Wewgirl
21-05-2008, 18:25
Osbad- you rock!!! I agree 100%. Kids LOVE spending time with their 'rents, regardless of the situation. Daddy's passion is son's passion. If you don't have kids, you will never never understand. FACT.

Harry
21-05-2008, 21:35
Nothing my three and a half year old daughter likes more than hanging out with her daddy in "the Goblin room" playing with the horses and doggys (wolves). She likes to line them up....just like Daddy. :D

fwacho
22-05-2008, 03:55
my five year-old has been painting and repainting the same squig beside me for almost a year. nice to see her learning. she particulalry like leafing through WD when I get my new one in the mail. teh balrog is her favorite model...go figure.

Kank
22-05-2008, 06:16
3 1/2 you say? Hmmm.. about the right size. You could proxy him/her as a Titan. :D

yeancientone
22-05-2008, 07:58
3 1/2 you say? Hmmm.. about the right size. You could proxy him/her as a Titan. :D
That's tournament legal, right?:D

Osbad
22-05-2008, 08:35
Osbad- you rock!!! I agree 100%. Kids LOVE spending time with their 'rents, regardless of the situation. Daddy's passion is son's passion. If you don't have kids, you will never never understand. FACT.

It's going slightly OT, but it bears on the point that its the "keeping a close relationship" bit that's important rather than the "what you do together" bit in determining whether your kids grow up to be healthy minded individuals.

It was brought to my attention recently that in the US the increase in gun crime over the 20th century (once the "Wild West" factor had died down) correlates closely with the increase in divorce rates. i.e. people going off the rails and ending up in a gun fight of some kind depends not so much on whether you played with guns as a kid, but whether your daddy was around to help you understand the difference between right and wrong...

I'm no pro-gun lobbyist. The complete opposite in fact. But it struck me as interesting that gun control in the US was far more lax back in the 50's and 60's than it is now, yet the rate of gun crime is much, much higher now.

Kids are only going to show respect for society if they have been shown respect by their parents as they grow up. And as a parent of 9 years now, I think I have learned that the thing that demonstrates I respect them is not that I buy them lots of toys (which I do), but that I take the time to play with them and listen to them and help them make sense of the world. Although of course to them its just perceived as "having fun with dad (& mum)", and the main focus has got to genuinely be about having a laugh together or it doesn't work.

Anyway, I could go on about how important dads to kids are (its a pet topic of mine), but its probably dragging things waaaaaaaaaay OT... :)

If anyone else has any stuff about geeking out with their kids to share though please let me know - PM me if necessary - I just love reading about that stuff!

Sleazy
22-05-2008, 09:29
3 1/2 you say? Hmmm.. about the right size. You could proxy him/her as a Titan. :D


yeah as it would count as a scratchbuild. dont stick any GW bitz to him though or Vic'll be along to label your child a kitbash.

BrianC
22-05-2008, 10:02
Good post Osbad, mirrors my thoughts exactly.

We use 40k as a "social" hobby that is the excuse for the whole family to sit down and paint or play; nothing better than everybody sitting down on a lazy Sunday morning having a natter while we all paint followed by a big Apoc game after lunch.

I guess I'm pretty lucky in that my kids are interested in the hobby and have the attention span to sit down and commit to something for a couple of hours. I guess not letting them watching much TV paid off.

Equally we might spend the day down the park, gardening, playing computer or board games or a host of other activities. Find what they really want to do by exposing them to as many different things as possible and nurture that desire as much as you can.

Back to the OT I'd get him a "proper" set of marines (or Orks might be a good choice, nice 'nd grungy) and let him choose how he wants them modelled and with what equipment. The more in control he feels the more he'll get out of it, if he hasn't already gone through it he is about at that age when he is making his first bid for independence.

Huw_Dawson
22-05-2008, 10:18
yeah as it would count as a scratchbuild. dont stick any GW bitz to him though or Vic'll be along to label your child a kitbash.

Not a Titan, though.

Maybe an Ork Stompa? :evilgrin:

- Huw

yeancientone
22-05-2008, 10:48
Out of curiosity, BrianC, how old are your offspring? Judging by the size of their armies, I'd hazard a guess at 14 (your son) and 12 (you daughter) - a complete, wild guess though!

BrianC
22-05-2008, 12:05
Out of curiosity, BrianC, how old are your offspring? Judging by the size of their armies, I'd hazard a guess at 14 (your son) and 12 (you daughter) - a complete, wild guess though!Thats about the age that they act, but they won't be seven until July. They have large armies as I've brought large chunks of it secondhand and cheap via ebay.

I'm not pretending my two are anything exceptional or anything, I know plenty of kids as smart or smarter than my two (there is always someone smarter is the mantra that I drum into them), but they are much more mentally mature (for most things) than their age would suggest. They can both read, understand and comment on Shakespeare, Dickens, etc., math and science (hes better at science, shes better at math/English) are at similar levels. I think it helps that their class at school is also particularly bright as well even for that school; roughly half the class have been entered for level 3 on their SATs, when I'm told for that age group its normally one or two children out of a class.

yeancientone
22-05-2008, 12:37
Sounds like they're doing splendidly! I think I'll take your advice and not bother with the snap-fits. 3 marines for £7 is a bit mean! I'll just tell him he can have one box of whatever he likes. Then submit his choice to a pscyhoanalyst.;) He'll make the weapon choices and daddy will glue ...

I also enjoy reading about parent's hobby experiences with their kids, so if anyone wants to spill the beans ...

Of course, daddy's preference is Fantasy, but I suspect he'll opt for 40k.

philbagnall
22-05-2008, 12:51
Only downside to having offspring interested in the hobby is that it's a little sad if/when they reach the time they're no longer interested. My son has followed my hobby since GW launched the LOTR range 7 years ago, accompanied me to my gaming club, done historical/40k/LOTR and toyed with WHFB. Now in his teens he's decided this last month or so that it isn't for him any more. I remember my own father being too insistent that I follow his hobby (which interested me not one bit) and made a positive decision not to try to pressure him into carrying on. The one thing I have advised is for him not to sell off his stuff yet, as there's always a chance he MAY change his mind (and in the meantime I get his Templar army to try out). So having kids interested in your hobby CAN have downsides too (as well as when the little blighters beat you)

Regards
Phil

yeancientone
22-05-2008, 15:04
I remember when myself and the Hobby parted ways ... I think it coincided with puberty. Still, I'm over that nonsense now and have been lured back in, though I focus mainly on WFRP. I goggled some models at GW a year or so ago and my wife bought me a skaven starter set!:D

Osbad
22-05-2008, 15:45
If my lads give up on gaming either temporarily or permanently it still won't have been a waste of time. We will have lots of shared memories of the fun times we have had together, and our relationship will be the stronger because of it. At least I hope so. Is that your experience Phil?

yeancientone
23-05-2008, 08:04
I used to play Space Hulk and Blood Bowl with my dad when I was a wee'un, and it wasn't really his hobby. Although my memory of it all is a little hazy, it means a lot to me that though he was busy, he always had time for a kick about on the astrogranite! (Anyone remember astrogranite? ... Sigh ...)

philbagnall
23-05-2008, 10:29
If my lads give up on gaming either temporarily or permanently it still won't have been a waste of time. We will have lots of shared memories of the fun times we have had together, and our relationship will be the stronger because of it. At least I hope so. Is that your experience Phil?

Absolutely Osbad, although he's a "stroppy teen" at the moment we certainly have a better relationship than would have been the case if we hadn't shared the gaming - he certainly has been no mean gamer, regularly beating me (although I don't have the greatest reputation for winning, until FoG arrived and my luck changed!) So for now I'll paint up the figures that he never got round to, including a DBA Early Achaemenid Persian, 1000 points or so of lizardmen and a fair amount of BT marines, and see what happens!

yeancientone
23-05-2008, 19:52
How could I forget Dungeonquest - that was my first GW game and we played it a lot - 15% chance of a player surviving! Thems were the days!

Grimbad
24-05-2008, 00:11
Of course, daddy's preference is Fantasy, but I suspect he'll opt for 40k.

This makes me think about what army I would have chosen at an age like that. The 'bad guys are cool' thing didn't really set in with me until I was about seven, IIRC, and that puts an awful lot of armies (the blatantly evil) out of the competition (-1 points for necrons, inquisition, dark eldar, chaos). Monsters and robots were cool (+1 points for tau, nids, orks), unless they were particularly scary (-2 points for nids and chaos). The idea of regular people as heroes wasn't introduced until later (-1 for tau, gaurd), and most of the cultural education we were given (in my case saturday morning cartoons, star wars movies, and disney movies in order of preference and frequency) featured superhuman warriors as heroes (+1 for orks, space marines, eldar, those being the armies presented as not altogether horrible and featuring superhumans).
Based on this, I would probably have chosen orks, marines, eldar or tau.
Based on the fact that eldar are pansies, they can pretty much be eliminated. Superman, Batman, and Luke Skywalker demonstrated that being able to beat people up without using a gun was very cool, so tau are out.
Leaving Orks and Marines, which are the two armies I have collected for any noticeable amount of time.

yeancientone
27-05-2008, 09:24
I will post photos shortly, as promised.

Basically we had a really pleasant visit, sunk a few ciders and got some Josef Bugman models for friends.

Nottingham is nice, but pretty scary at the same time - when people go out to the pub, they resemble ranks of warriors on their way to battle. They're all very friendly, but I wouldn't want to get on the wrong side of them. It's not surprising this town produced "grim and perilous" and the "grim darkness" of Warhammer and 40k respectively.

One disappointment - I thought that there would be massive dioramas on display, but I think I was getting mixed up with the exhibition they had at the Castle a while back.

My son went for three space marines on bikes, which we're assembling now. He was a bit taken aback by the contents of the box - he's not unused to sprues, but it's a bit underwhelming after the excitement of the box art. He's getting excited now though, as we're gradually assembling the models and he likes choosing their poses.

blongbling
27-05-2008, 09:57
the old museum used to have large dioramas in it but most people wanted to see beautifully painted minis so they changed it

Jedi152
27-05-2008, 09:58
We're nice people really! :)

Glad you enjoyed it! The lack of scenarios is annoying - it's sad to think of such gorgeous pieces of modelling and painting sat in a warehouse somewhere collecting dust.

yeancientone
27-05-2008, 12:40
No offence! I liked the place, but I got the feeling that violence was brewing under the surface. We saw a man on crutches attacked, but one of the locals caught the attacker and threw him against the wall! I just got the impression it was a rough, but friendly, town. I just wish it was closer - despite the foul weather, we had a great time.

yeancientone
27-05-2008, 12:46
Here's the pics, as promised:

39809

39810

39811