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View Full Version : Legions of Middle Earth - will it be re-done?



Odin
02-06-2008, 13:16
I keep nearly getting into LotR (difficult when I don't really know wnyone else who plays it, and have to force my WHFB and 40K playing mates at gunpoint to play it, well, not quite, but nearly).

Anyway, I've never bought LoME, and I'm wondering if it's likely to need updating any time soon. The Mordor book includes units not mentioned in LoME doesn't it? And I'm assuming we'll see another few releases this year (Rohan? Isengard? Elves?), which may make it even more out of date. I really don't want to buy it only to find it gets replaced within a year.

So, does anyone know of any plans to re-release the book?

Baggers
02-06-2008, 13:27
Don't worry the Mordor Books includes forces lists from LOME with the added new characters in.

Odin
02-06-2008, 13:34
I've not actually seen LoME before - what's in it, just lists and a page of rules for creating armies?

Guard Of The Citadel
02-06-2008, 17:00
Well yeah mainly, it has sample armies which they have come up with to help you with army building and they also have, under each army section, the names of the heroes and warriors and their points costs. Note that LoME does not contain ANY profiles

Odin
02-06-2008, 17:09
Well yeah mainly, it has sample armies which they have come up with to help you with army building and they also have, under each army section, the names of the heroes and warriors and their points costs. Note that LoME does not contain ANY profiles

Sounds like a White Dwarf article would have been enough. After all, there's no point having the points costs if you don't have the profiles, so you need the relevant books anyway. So what's left is the lists of what each army has available, table of allies and rules saying you can't have more than 33% missile troops. 6 Pages of a White Dwarf should cover that, and they want us to pay 25 for it?!

Guard Of The Citadel
02-06-2008, 17:17
25 for LoME? Thats a bit pricey isn't it? At my local GW its only 12

Lord Hurin
02-06-2008, 17:58
Yes, it's a GW money-grabbing scheme to be sure, but it IS a nice book with lots of colour pictures and the like. It would've been more like 20+ pages in WD, which they undoubtably would've run over at least 3 or 4 issues, costing you about the same amount in the end.

Baggers
02-06-2008, 18:24
To be honest I really don't like it. I have been playing LOTR since day one (though that is irrelevant) and love the fact that it was a scenario driven game and not a pitched battle game. Though you could do a pitch battle if you wanted to. The original points match rules were also designed for scenario driven games, instead of turn up, march forward with a bit of shooting and head into combat.

Then comes LOME and GW forget all about Scenario and go for army lists. Not a great move in my opinion.

lorelorn
03-06-2008, 08:59
Uh... Legions contains no mention of pitched battles like you describe. It has 40-odd army lists and then 10 scenarios.

Plus army comp and allied forces rules, but the play empahsis is still on scenarios.

Difference now is that instead of being restricted to pre-made scenarios from the film or book, you can now tailor your own. I call that a plus.

Odin
03-06-2008, 11:07
25 for LoME? Thats a bit pricey isn't it? At my local GW its only 12

Ah, the (bloody awful) new GW website must still be showing the US prices but with the sign. 12 is a lot more reasonable, thanks!

I understand where Baggers is coming from actually - the main thing that atracted me to LotR was the fact that is was focussed on story-based scenarios, and wasn't obsessed with the tournament format that WHFB and 40K seem to have slipped into. I have absolutely no interest in a battle that doesn't make sense (Last Alliance Gondorians against Isengard for example).

On the other hand it's handy to be able to play against any opponent simply by turning up with an army, rather than having to pre-arrange which scenario you will play. I just worry that it's taking over from the story-based scanarios that made LotR such a breath of fresh air.

HsojVvad
21-06-2008, 18:03
Ah, the (bloody awful) new GW website must still be showing the US prices but with the sign. 12 is a lot more reasonable, thanks!

I understand where Baggers is coming from actually - the main thing that atracted me to LotR was the fact that is was focussed on story-based scenarios, and wasn't obsessed with the tournament format that WHFB and 40K seem to have slipped into. I have absolutely no interest in a battle that doesn't make sense (Last Alliance Gondorians against Isengard for example).

On the other hand it's handy to be able to play against any opponent simply by turning up with an army, rather than having to pre-arrange which scenario you will play. I just worry that it's taking over from the story-based scanarios that made LotR such a breath of fresh air.


Yeah but people have their favorite army to play or make, so they want to use it in a tourney, even thought it's not fluff wise pratical. Remeber LotR is to have fun.

Irish1983
21-06-2008, 18:17
LoME is a very good book and no a white dwarf wouldn't have been practical (it would have BEEN the white dwarf). Its a very good idea that allows players who like small-larger-huge scale games of LOTR. It lets you make themed/restricted army lists for more balanced play (no more sauran and a balrog with ring wraiths on fell beasts in one army). Before it came out you could have whatever the heck you wanted in your army and that didn't translate well to larger scale games (no format for construction, and anything was game). Now there are eras and ally blocks that fit theme and story wise. You can almost make anything you want regardless, and you can get the profiles and most of their special rules from the GW site in pdf (except most recnt books after Ruin of arnor). You do not need to buy the source books (but its a good idea to get the one for the army you decide to play. Some of the points costs are changed/updated over the LoME lists.

leadlair
23-06-2008, 15:43
LoME did a good job of organizing the game into a system that allowed for more balanced forces. You can still pretty much take whatever you want but it does take a little more planning.

The only problem is that it is now pretty much out of date. I have not heard any news about a new one but I don't really think it would be worth getting anymore. It is better to just pick up the new source books as they come out.

lotrchampion
23-06-2008, 18:01
Personally I would advise getting it-for the older stuff (i.e. not Mordor or Harad) it is fine, and the Scenarios are brilliant. Also means if you plan on attending a tournament you have half the rules already. I expect it will be redone when the next edition comes around, possibly integrated into the big rulebook, I'm not sure, but I would still get it since it's the only place where some lists currently appear (e.g. Elves etc).

leadlair
24-06-2008, 05:42
Personally I would advise getting it-for the older stuff (i.e. not Mordor or Harad) it is fine, and the Scenarios are brilliant. Also means if you plan on attending a tournament you have half the rules already. I expect it will be redone when the next edition comes around, possibly integrated into the big rulebook, I'm not sure, but I would still get it since it's the only place where some lists currently appear (e.g. Elves etc).

I believe that it doesn't hold all of the stuff in Mordor and Harad (well I know that for sure). But does it still hold everything in the Gondor in Flames book?

Dalamyr the Fleetmaster
27-06-2008, 13:28
If your planning to play LOTR on a tourney level then it's well worth getting apart from that stick to the sourcebooks

bufordbugman
27-06-2008, 23:26
I'm just starting LotR and bought Legions. It's valuable for the thematic lists and for the allies who can fight alongside each other, which makes it very easy to plan ahead what kind of army(ies) to build and thus what purchases to make. But the scenarios are the real gem of the book: they are excellent, easy to roll up randomly, and allow great variation of objective. You're not doing the same kind of fight over and over (WHF pitched battle, anyone?).

HsojVvad
30-06-2008, 19:56
Do we really need LoME? All I keep reading is people keep saying it tells you who allies up with who. Well the new suppliments that come out now tell you that anyways. Do we really need to dish out money just to see who allies up with whom? If I don't believe if the opponent has a legal army I should just be able to see his suppliment and see if it's legal.

What else is in there that is really worth while to justify the cost of getting it? I was about to pick it up, but got Khazadum instead and a few paints. I just don't see it. I could be wrong so can anyone correct me if I am wrong?

slaughteredbull
30-06-2008, 20:26
Its worth getting for the scenarios and the terrain generation charts (if you use them) but the army lists in the book are becoming outdated by every new release.

Myself, I'm still glad that I brought it as the 12 scenarios in offer more than enough different battles to keep me from getting bored in a days worth of gaming thats usually spans about 3 - 4 LotR games.

rodmillard
01-07-2008, 02:26
LoME is still worth getting for the allies rules and the scenarios (especially if you plan on doing tourneys, as these are the scenarios they use). I'm in 2 minds about whether its worth it for the actual army lists - it is useful to be able to see what each army can take, particularly if you're just getting into the game and want to look at armies before you buy models, but each new release brings in extra troop types that aren't in the book.

Personally, I would expect to see a new starter box and a new edition of LoME released to tie in with the Hobbit movies, even if they don't change the actual rules (Please God, don't let them change the rules). The only "big" supplements needed now are Elves, Orthanc and Rohan, and if these are released in 2009/early 2010 that paves the way for revised core products to accompany the release of the movie in summer 2010 - which can then be followed by new journey supplements, realm books on the misty mountains and eregion, without the need to re-release anything currently in print except the Fall Of The Necromancer (which will be covered by Hobbit Journey books anyway...)

leadlair
01-07-2008, 04:54
LoME is still worth getting for the allies rules and the scenarios (especially if you plan on doing tourneys, as these are the scenarios they use). I'm in 2 minds about whether its worth it for the actual army lists - it is useful to be able to see what each army can take, particularly if you're just getting into the game and want to look at armies before you buy models, but each new release brings in extra troop types that aren't in the book.

Personally, I would expect to see a new starter box and a new edition of LoME released to tie in with the Hobbit movies, even if they don't change the actual rules (Please God, don't let them change the rules). The only "big" supplements needed now are Elves, Orthanc and Rohan, and if these are released in 2009/early 2010 that paves the way for revised core products to accompany the release of the movie in summer 2010 - which can then be followed by new journey supplements, realm books on the misty mountains and eregion, without the need to re-release anything currently in print except the Fall Of The Necromancer (which will be covered by Hobbit Journey books anyway...)

I agree.... it will probably only be redone once they are done with the last 3-4 supplements (don't forget Numenorians) and at the very least have some idea how the Hobbit will effect the game.

rodmillard
01-07-2008, 20:49
I agree.... it will probably only be redone once they are done with the last 3-4 supplements (don't forget Numenorians) and at the very least have some idea how the Hobbit will effect the game.

That's true I had forgotten numenoreans. Mind you, they may hold off an elves release until after they see how Newline treats the Mirkwood elves in the Hobbit - either that, or we will have seperate books for "wood elves" and "high elves" ... why does that sound familiar?!? :angel:

Joewrightgm
01-07-2008, 23:56
Well, its like the elves are like men; there's heinz 57 varieties of them, but at the end of the day, the only thing that makes a mirkwood elf different from a elf of Imladris is gear.

rodmillard
02-07-2008, 01:55
I was thinking more in terms of the model releases, rather than rules - there's not much point releasing a mirkwood range only to have to re-do it to meet demand for models based on the elves in the Hobbit movie. My personal favourite would be to separate the elves based on era, rather than homeland, so 2nd age elves (including cavalry & chariots which can be converted) are released with the Last Alliance book, and 3rd age elves can come out when they know what the mirkwood elves are going to look like on the screen...

Joewrightgm
02-07-2008, 03:01
Ah, very good points sir; considering that most of the current range is based in many ways off the movie 'looks' for most stuff, that would make perfect sense.

leadlair
02-07-2008, 05:39
Ah, very good points sir; considering that most of the current range is based in many ways off the movie 'looks' for most stuff, that would make perfect sense.

With weta still doing the props I doubt they would change the look too much. So I don't think that would be such a big problem.

Leviro
02-07-2008, 08:57
Hmmm i wonder if thranduil will look like the film version.
I hope they dont change the core rules, because we will end up like W40K, an edition and then every sourcebook released again... I mean we dont need updated rules, there balanced, in fact its almost impossible to un-balance them

destroyerlord
05-07-2008, 03:51
I thought the current wood elf models were for Mirkwood? They came out with the fall of the necromancer right? Haldir's elves are from Lothlorien.
But currently you can have plastics with no armour (wood elves), plastics with heavy armour (high elves/last allaince box) or metals with light armour (Haldir's elves), and it doesn't really matter that much where they come from.