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d4m0s4n
09-11-2005, 14:51
The concept of a medieval world in the 40k setting interests me quite a bit.

Have there been any Fluff pieces written about medieval worlds in the 40k universe? I could imagine all sorts of juicy =][= games in such a setting.

One such idea would be having an Inquisitor land, discover the almost cliche Alien Menace, and then have the Inquisitor gather a band of back-water troops to handle the situation. Of course the Inquisitor would be pulled into local politics, etc., etc., etc....

You'd have the Inquistor and retinue on one side along with human spearmen, swordsmen, etc. arranged against a swarm of Genestealers or hybrids. Results of the battle would vary I'm sure but I'd put my money on the 'stealers.

Odin
09-11-2005, 14:59
I like this idea as well. My planned Imperial Guard army is based on troops from a medieval world. The idea that there are remnants of more advanced technology is one which particularly appeals to me, and the idea that the civilisation on the planet has developed technologies in a different order to our real-life medieval period. Primitive steam-technology alongside medieval men-at-arms and elite warriors with semi-mythical technologies such as shotguns or even lasguns fighting from stone-built castles.

Achilles
09-11-2005, 15:21
i remember a story in warhammer monthly where a few adventures went looking for an abandoned castle... the start of it u thought u were reading a whfb comic... the castle only appeared to be a long lost and dug in chaos Titan.

i think a backwater world would make a great background for an army esp with inquisitor... go for it... but remember most regimants drawn from backwater worlds, medieval world get rigorous indocterine and training.
a bit like the fenrisians get once they get selected to become a space wolf.

malika
09-11-2005, 15:23
Knight Worlds tend to have some medieval nature

Sai-Lauren
09-11-2005, 16:15
In RT era, one of the main things of the 40k section of Warhammer Seige was a few 40k figures being assigned to attack a castle containing a psyker/warlord etc, and having to use the local populace (medieval peasants) to aid them.

But as Achilles said, once they're recruited into the guard, they'll be trained to use las guns etc.

El_Machinae
09-11-2005, 17:36
It's a neat idea. The 'backwards' world would probably be such because 1000s of years ago the population had finished consuming all the mineral wealth of the planet (oil, uranium, etc.) and had spiraled slowly into primitive technologies.

An inquisitor with a modicum of technology (steam engines was a good example) could have a huge effect on the economy. Introducing steam engines would free up thousands of workers, so they could be recruited into armies without decimating the economies.

This is similar to today, where we've increased production through technologies (and should continue to do so), so we can afford all these 'non-producing' careers.

Helicon_One
09-11-2005, 19:02
Have you read Pawns Of Chaos?

Tim

d4m0s4n
09-11-2005, 21:48
Pawns of Chaos? Was ist das?

Minister
10-11-2005, 02:06
Look up Uriah Jacobus's fluff some time...

Pawns of Chaos is a 40K novel, and a surprisingly good one, set on a planet inhabited by the decendants of a crashed Imperial squadron and a "native" (in that they have been there for far longer, and have lost coherent records of their origins) group of tribal-level humans who worship the Changer of Ways. I will not go into detail, but will comment that the contrast between the "Imperium" (using mostly localy-manufactured solid shot weapons and crude vehicles with a few relics) and the "natives" (spears and blades with a few talented sorcerers) is quite noticable.

Minister
10-11-2005, 02:21
Uriah Jacobus, Protector of the Faith
Uriah Jacobus was a Missionary travelling the worlds west of Bakka, in the southern galaxy. By the age of fifty he had introduced fifteen new worlds to the Imperial Creed, aremarkable achievement considering the scarcity of inhabited planets in the region. He achieved even greater recognition on the half-frozen world of Solstice. After spending three years learning about the inhabitants of the world, whose technology and society was reaching a feudal stage, Jacobus started to introduce the doctrines of the Ecclesiarcy into the beliefs of the natives' own rather disorganised religion.
When meeting the king of one particular realm, Jacobus was disturbed to see an idol of the kingdom's god – a four-armed god of death. Guessing a Genestealer cult to be involved, Jacobus returned to more friendly kingdoms and persuaded them to ally with each other to attack the traitor king. As suspected, when Jacobus arrived with a mass of crossbowmen and cavaly at his back, his army was attacked by a horde of Genestealers. Although many of the horrific creatures were felled by a storm of quarrels, the Genestealers started tearing apart the infantry with ease.
Jacobus split his knights into two forces. One he left as a reserve while he led the other on a flank march thatstruck at the rear of the Genestealer cult. Smashing his way through a screen of human Brood Brothers, the knights attacked the heart of the cult. The Patriarch was finally slain, though a mound of bodies lay heaped around its corpse, and the Magus was spitted on a lance. The cult was momentarily confused by the loss of its leaders. Seeing the inaction of their foes, the rest of the knights attacked, sweeping away the disorientated aliens in one glorious charge.
After the Battle of Solstice, Jacobus became a legendary figure, able to call upon the Emperor's aid to thwart whatever odds opposed him. He converted another six worlds to the Emperor's worship before he finally died of a lung-destroying virus on the death world of Gorang.

Helicon_One
10-11-2005, 15:03
As well as Pawns Of Chaos, I forgot to mention Daemon World. The human population in that book only have a fairly primitive level of technology, but there are other factors which make that less important to the story (without giving anything away).

Tim

Achilles
10-11-2005, 15:14
An inquisitor with a modicum of technology (steam engines was a good example) could have a huge effect on the economy.

I thought the level of understanding toward technology in the 40k universe was so low that only the adeptus mechanicus know anything. the inquisitor wouldn't know a steam engine from a warp drive... lol:D
but the technologies he would posses, like a pistol or powersword, would make him look godlike to the peasants... remember how Vandire convinced the Daugters of the Emperor (later sisters of battle) to become his bodyguard. he used a rosarius to show them he was protected by the emperor.

El_Machinae
10-11-2005, 18:09
I would think that an Inquisitor could know how to create a steam engine. They are reasonably intelligent people, with a heck of a lot of life experience. Sure, he couldn't make a microwave ... I'm talking a Da Vinci level of technology here ...

"This is my BOOM stick!"

brother_fandango
10-11-2005, 20:24
i recall reading a short story of a 40k world that wouldnt harness the wheel, thought it was evil. the main charatcer's name was rudy, and he got possessed, and people on the planet were amazed that space mariens were real, seeing as to how they only came about every 1000 years, the planet was so backwaterish.

Helicon_One
10-11-2005, 21:23
and people on the planet were amazed that space mariens were real, seeing as to how they only came about every 1000 years, the planet was so backwaterish.

Uhh, unless you live on Ultramar or Armageddon, that's not particularly unusual.

Tim

NakedFisherman
10-11-2005, 22:00
I don't know about medieval worlds. At least, not in the same vein as WHFB.

There's feral planets everywhere. Primitive cultures are a big part of the Imperium.

However, knights and swords and free companies and steam power are out of place. It seems like the OP is searching for a way to justify WHFB models in 40K. It works, but you can't just put Spearmen on 25mm round bases and call it an army. Would just look odd.

Some models are great for this purpose, like Marauders, but Empire troops just don't look the part without some good conversions.

d4m0s4n
11-11-2005, 01:43
However, knights and swords and free companies and steam power are out of place. It seems like the OP is searching for a way to justify WHFB models in 40K.

Not trying to support the use-- don't have to. The 40k fluff makes mention of medieval (as well as feral) worlds. To me there is a distinct difference between the two.

So when they say Medieval are they talking about swords and spears? Limited gunpowder?

Early medieval? Late?

NakedFisherman
11-11-2005, 01:58
Not trying to support the use-- don't have to. The 40k fluff makes mention of medieval (as well as feral) worlds. To me there is a distinct difference between the two.

So when they say Medieval are they talking about swords and spears? Limited gunpowder?

Early medieval? Late?

I think they're referring to the culture and society rather than their tech level and if they wear frilly uniforms or not.

What worlds in particular are described as 'medieval'? That's an odd designation.

Khaine's Messenger
11-11-2005, 03:26
The concept of a medieval world in the 40k setting interests me quite a bit.

Not me. Really, it falls into the category of "slice of the past" worlds that I find particularly annoying. Most people treat them like theme-parks and rennaissance fairs.


Have there been any Fluff pieces written about medieval worlds in the 40k universe?

There's a quasi-Enlightenment era world that features in the short "Xenocide." I thought it was pretty interesting, although I was somewhat disheartened when flintlocks, wheellocks, arquebus, muskets, etc. were referred to as "archaeotech." It makes sense (archaeo...), but it sorta ruins the "mystique" of archaeotech (perhaps rightly so *shrugs*)...and there's also a sorta rustic planet featured in "The Curiosity," where a rogue termagant is running around the forest near some village. "The Angels" tells the story of Space Marines beating the crud out of...something...from the POV of some peasants (still my fav perspective piece with marines...).


I could imagine all sorts of juicy =][= games in such a setting.

The only thing medieval/feudal worlds are particularly good for are sucking up cannon fodder (shanghai'ing crewmen, inducting marines, picking up and quickly training regiments of guardsmen for the nearest convenient meatgrinders...although one wonders if their populations can sustain that)...or for a discrete meeting place where it's not likely that anyone will notice your comings and goings (say, like the mini-conclave Eisenhorn has in Malleus).

Any "feudal" world that is long-inducted in the Imperium is probably on its way to a low-class civilized world, though, if only because any assigned Imperial Commander will probably start getting bored governing a mudball in the butt end of nowhere. At some point, technological diffusion will at the very least start some of them to thinking, and even though the thought police of the Imperium are nigh-omnipresent, they are only "nigh"....

Easy E
11-11-2005, 18:26
Does the term medieval world only refer to it's government structures (Fuedalism and Monarchies) or its actual tech level. This is unclear to me? If it is Tech-level, what sort of technology would be considered medieval by a group of people that can genetically engineer space marines, build gigantic warp capable spaceships, and Titans? In the 40th millenium, do they even have a frame of reference to the medieval period of Earth? Or is it simply a GW construct, and residents of the Imperium would call it something different?

Helicon_One
11-11-2005, 20:25
Yeah, the entire concept of a 'medieval' age would be lost on the Imperial mind, and is probably a word thrown in for the benefit of the 21st century reader. I guess a more appropriate description would be 'primitive'.

Tim

Ivan Stupidor
11-11-2005, 20:52
Feudal worlds, to me, makes slightly more sense than "medieval" (athough one could argue that it merely describes their society and not their tech-level). "Primitive" would likely be reserved for Feral worlds, where the inhabitants are incredbily afraid of such dangerous weapons as the Knife On A Stick and the Bigger Club Than Mine.

d4m0s4n
12-11-2005, 01:43
...where the inhabitants are incredbily afraid of such dangerous weapons as the Knife On A Stick and the Bigger Club Than Mine.

Hehehehehe....

brother_fandango
13-11-2005, 01:15
there was chittum im an american WD some time ago about some frothing lunatics going on a holy rampage against some heritics. they had delapated guns and stuff, and the narrator even saw some as he put it "primative black powder?" weapons in the bunch.