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ratatosk
13-11-2005, 20:42
Is Roleplaying a dieing hobby? Or is it merely going deeper underground? It seems to be harder and harder to find new players, I do not necessary mean new to your group I mean inexperianced Roleplayers, people new to the hobby.

Does anyone else find this?

Wintersdark
14-11-2005, 01:38
I do. Mind you, I don't play role playing games anymore either - they take too much time, which is something I sorely lack. I can play warhammer at random intervals, with about 2hrs for a game (+ a bit for setup if necessary, though it's often not depending on where I play).

Role playing games, on the other hand, aren't terribly much fun unless you're in a regular gaming group. There are few people who can reliably get together regularly enough as a group, with noone missing, for a good chunk of time, to continue an ongoing story line. This is a major cause of people giving up role playing; and a major reason a lot of people don't start.

Further, video games and other games such as Warhammer have come a long ways from the by-gone days of Role Playing. There are a lot of new options for people to do in groups. Online games, etc, which offer more than simply mental stimulation. You still get some measure of social interaction (although not in person, that's an entirely different subject) but are visually stimulating as well. You can play whenever you like, for however long you like, without damaging the game.

There will always be role playing games, and people playing them, but fewer and fewer as time progresses and the other option continue to improve.

I don't mean to argue that video games are inherently better, mind you, I am aware of the advantages of Role Playing games. I wish I could still play them. But it's very hard to convince someone who's never played one how much fun they are when they can wander into a EB store and watch someone playing WoW or something like that.

devolutionary
14-11-2005, 01:46
Dying? No. In a slow patch? Definitely. Roleplaying games are still turning along and new players are coming in, but like many hobbies it is going through a slow spot. The rapid and sudden increase in the popularity of video games and the like is certainly an element in that, but at the same time there will always be a place amongst folks for that group element that you can't get online. Sure, WoW, EQII, and other RPG and MMORPGs are sucking up the market a little, but fascination in them will die as well, for a short time, leading people to seek adventure of a different type elsewhere.

RPGs have the advantage of being playable by anyone virtually anywhere. That's something that computers, at this point in time, can not promise whatsoever. PSPs and other hand-helds are costly and limited in scope, and laptops are just plain annoying for games. A book beats both hands down.

Wintersdark
14-11-2005, 04:12
Pen and Paper RPG's will always be around, but I'd bet they'll never see a revival to the glory days of the 80's and 90's. There will always be a niche market for them, though.

The video game sorts, think the fascination will die as well? I doubt it. In the particular games, certainly, but overall? Not very likely. They will continue to advance, as they can offer more and more to the players.

That said, I don't think pen and paper RPG's will dwindle much more than they are now, but like I said, I highly doubt there will ever be a significant revival.

starlight
14-11-2005, 04:16
I have to agree with the above.

VGs are taking a huge bite - they are easier, don't require *meeting* with a regular group and are far more accessible to the age group that roleplaying typically appeals to (youth).

In person RPGs will never die, but with the fluidity of modern society and the inroads of VGs, it's all that much harder to keep a stable group, which is what keeps any group going over the years.

Eldacar
14-11-2005, 06:06
It isn't "dying", so to speak, but it isn't as big as it once was, either. What I've found is that more and more often, there are sites on the internet that have forums dedicated to roleplaying games, since it allows RPGers to play their favourite game with others from around the world, rather than just the same old group with the same old story. That and RP games like Achaea (a text-based MUD) are more and more popular, whereas the average teenager will be more attracted to games like WoW.

Slazton
14-11-2005, 11:41
I would say in a rouch patch that it more than likely won't pull out of.

Think about it, the days of pen and paper RPGs are limited as people can now login to an online RPG and actually 'see' the world around them and follow some other GM's idea, but digitally.

Personally, pen and paper RPGs is becoming hardcore only and well, in truth, it always was once video games entered the realm of RPGs ;)

hairyman
17-11-2005, 12:00
Pen and paper is just in a different class to PC games, though. We have managed to keep a regular group going for seven or eight years now, and while there are peaks and troughs in attendence etc we keep on going.

I think the hobby is on the way out, though. It's harder and harder to find anywhere that sells role playing books, and the few systems that flourish have squeezed every last publication they can to milk as much money as possible.

nikolai7
17-11-2005, 12:49
I still find pen and paper rpg far more enjoyable than videogames, if only because it allows you to do whatever you like, it has a freedom that no game can offer. Also i find the preparation for a pen and paper rpg is fun aswell, thinking up new plots and writing background for characters..

ratatosk
17-11-2005, 23:02
[QUOTE=the few systems that flourish have squeezed every last publication they can to milk as much money as possible.[/QUOTE]

*cough* white wolf *cough*

Rik Valdis
17-11-2005, 23:22
The problem is that a decline like this is very difficult to stop once it gets started. A decline in roleplaying means fewr stockists and fewer groups so they will pull in fewer new players, so there will be fewer stockists and players, and so on. This is the reason I have never got into pen and paper roleplaying despite definately having an interest in it.

ratatosk
18-11-2005, 07:22
My advice is to give it a try, there may be a decline but the quality of the game is mainly down to the DM/GM/ST etc... Besides if more people tried it there may become more stockists more groups and at least a certain amount of stability if not exactly a return to the hallowed days of the 80s and 90s.

Still, i add a lie to my own words, i have found 2 new players :) both with very little experiance.

People out there want to try RP, they just need to be shown the light ;)

(or is it the soul damning darkness?)

Wintersdark
18-11-2005, 23:30
I still find pen and paper rpg far more enjoyable than videogames, if only because it allows you to do whatever you like, it has a freedom that no game can offer. Also i find the preparation for a pen and paper rpg is fun aswell, thinking up new plots and writing background for characters..Certainly. I'd never argue against the benifits of pen and paper RPG's, nor compare them in a "what's better" battle to video games - apples and oranges, really.

Still, the reality is that while they'll always have a small, scattered following, they'll never see a following like they once had again. It's sad, really. I get all nostalgic whenever I see old RPG books now.


The problem is that a decline like this is very difficult to stop once it gets started. A decline in roleplaying means fewr stockists and fewer groups so they will pull in fewer new players, so there will be fewer stockists and players, and so on. This is the reason I have never got into pen and paper roleplaying despite definately having an interest in it.
If you, and others you know, have the time and availability to get together reliably and play regularly, do it.

Unlike a lot of other hobbies, pen and paper RPG's require very little support. It's nice to get new stuff, but honestly, the best RPG groups tend to run on systems based on a commercial one then modified themselves over time, based in their own custom made worlds, etc, etc.

You really just need a basic system, and then you go from there. The system itself doesn't particularly matter, as you can freely change whatever you like to make it work better, although there are countless wonderful systems out there. It depends on what style of games you like.

Seriously, though, if you can get a group together, go for it. You can get an endless amount of entertainment out of little to no financial investment at all.

hairyman
19-11-2005, 00:02
I would absolutely second every word of that. Role playing , IMO, is a hell of a lot more fun and immersive than wargaming, and it costs only the price of a pen and a bit of paper. It is also well on the way out, with a fraction of the systems there used to be having survived into the twenty-first century.

If you can get hold of a copy of Rune Quest and Advanced Rune Quest then I'd advise giving that a go (probaly less than £5 each on e-bay nowadays). Flexible low power fantasy gaming with endless scope to be customised for your own worlds. It's not a game that will drown you in books, supplements and wordy role-playing advice either... old fashioned stats and character sheets with the rest up to you.

White Wolf drives me nuts (I'm currently playing in a well run Mage game, and have played and run numerous other Vampire and Werewolf campaigns). They fill sourcebook after sourcebook with so much iffy fluff that's integral to the core of the systems that you end up being stifled. Give me a few stats and some hit points any day... I generally find this leads to more free and expressive role playing anyway.

Pillx
19-11-2005, 10:40
Hmmm. Not sure if it's dying but definitely harder to get a game rolling as I get older. Maybe when I hit retirement age though...? hehe
At one point, RPGs took a heavy hit when CCGs emerged onto the market. It not only vied for people's time but also money. Video games have also made large gains so the "landscape" is definitely different compared to what it was 10 and 5 years ago with all the things that's going on. I remember hearing all the crazy stuff going on like WotC buying TSR and then WotC getting bought up and Fasa, Task Force Games, blah blah dying off or something else -ICE losing its grip the MERP games... definitely the landscape is different. Wiz Kids has made there mark as well with their collectable trading game figs. Pirates of the Spanish Mane (SP?) is pretty neat and I did throw some money at it but for me, the collectability is a detraction.

Still, I play sit down RPGs regularly. Talking to a couple of game store folks, board games have taken an upspin recently it seems so who knows? I doubt RPGs will die.



.

Wintersdark
19-11-2005, 15:58
If you can get hold of a copy of Rune Quest and Advanced Rune Quest then I'd advise giving that a go (probaly less than £5 each on e-bay nowadays). Flexible low power fantasy gaming with endless scope to be customised for your own worlds. It's not a game that will drown you in books, supplements and wordy role-playing advice either... old fashioned stats and character sheets with the rest up to you.Hear hear! Simple systems, in my experience, work far better than complex ones. Sure, you can get more "realism" in a very complicated system, but it stifles imagination and moreso than in any other game, imagination is critical to a good RPG.

Simpler systems also offer the advantage of being able to be easily adapted to a number of settings. Instead of being fixed as a fantasy game, for example, you can adapt them to being a sci-fi game, or being set in the wild west, or anything else.

Also, more "low power" systems seem to work better overall - particularly for long running games - than "high power" systems. If your characters become so powerful as to be able to single-handedly take on small armies, then it becomes increasingly cartoonish and difficult keep the play immersive. Further, the games themselves have to ramp up in scale dramatically in order to provide challenging opponents and the like. I love systems where a simple sword thrust can kill the most powerful player, where mortality is always a key point. Combat is lethal, injuries crippling.

I'm rambling now, but it's because I have a deep seated love for good pen and paper role playing games. It makes me long for the days when I was a young lad, going to school, with so much time free. School is wonderful, but I never appreciated it when I was there. Kinda like youth in general, really. Wasted on the young!

Lockjaw
29-11-2005, 05:08
never really noticed much of dying out around here, we just started a new RPG group with many being new players, those of us that have been playing for awhile have almost every book we need between us, 3 tubs of dice, and between warhammer, other wargames, and all the pre-painted D&D mimis we have everything we need, manage to meet sunday nights, have food, and go for a few hours straight, and we keep getting people at work and college asking if they could come over too. Alot of the game shops are dying from the looks of it, but the ones that focus on RPGs seem to be doing better than ones that focus on CCGs or mini's games, and when i worked at Waldenbooks, we sold RPG books like crazy.

Zanusiekk
07-12-2005, 17:00
I believe that roleplaying in the classic sense will never really die out, but rather find new venues to exist in. As online CRPGs continue to evolve and improve, hand in had with direct-comms software such as Skype, you will be able to squeeze in some enjoyable roleplaying between bouts of monster hacking and dungeon crawling... much like what was the case with the original PnP dungeon games, really...
New times, new ways, the best of both worlds will intertwine and spawn bright new Glory!

arxhon
23-12-2005, 13:47
the few systems that flourish have squeezed every last publication they can to milk as much money as possible.

You say this like you want gaming companies to go out of business.:confused:

Anyway, some interesting commentary here (http://www.livejournal.com/users/mearls/115593.html). Also, scroll down most of the way to the bottom and read the entry by rsdancey (Ryan Dancey).

Actually, i'll just quote it:


2005 was the best year in the history of the fantasy roleplaying game concept. In 2005, 4 million people paid more than $480,000,000 to play World of Warcraft. That figure is five times the total revenue generated by the tabletop roleplaying game segment >of all companies, of all time, combined<.

The population of people trained to understand the value premise of sword & sorcery RPGs by D&D have found a medium which asserts a new fun/not-fun ratio far more balanced towards "fun" than tabletop RPGs and they have embraced it with gusto.

The core network of D&D players drew in an expanded community of friends, dates, relatives, and co-workers by extolling the fun to be had in kicking down doors, whacking monsters, taking stuff, and powering up. After a half-decade spent developing the technology and the service infrastructure at Ultima Online and EverQuest, the industry hit the ball out of the park.

I think it will be impossible, form here on out, to separate the on-line and tabletop categories of RPGs - the former will become increasingly similar to the latter as new technology like voice & video become integrated into the experience - allowing "virtual tabletops" to exist. It is already impossible to ignore the economic impact MMORPGs are having on the tabletop sub-segment - they decimated it in 2005. Only time will tell if some value premise can be rebuilt from the foundations available to entice a new generation of gamers into the hobby - or if the battle has already been lost.

Me, I'm betting on the guys with $480,000,000.

Ryan

hairyman
23-12-2005, 14:04
You say this like you want gaming companies to go out of business.:confused:


Well, I certianly didn't mean it like that, and I understand why they push every book they can... just that's the sort of thing that's never really appealed to me (see earlier posts about preferring just a core system and the room to design the rest yourself).

I think the on-line RPG's and the pen and paper ones will, however, remian clearly divided. On-line games focus on the cheap kicks of RPG's (hacking monsters and getting treasure), but miss the best part of pen and paper games... namely the narrative storytelling skills, the face to face interplay between people, and the freedom to invent your own universe with no more tools than a pencil and a sheet of A4.

arxhon
23-12-2005, 20:15
Well, I certianly didn't mean it like that, and I understand why they push every book they can... just that's the sort of thing that's never really appealed to me (see earlier posts about preferring just a core system and the room to design the rest yourself).


Well, that's part of being in business. In order to stay in business in the RPG industry, one must keep producing new product. While corebooks are the big seller of a system, they tend to drop off really quickly once they've been released. From what i understand, selling out a print run of a thousand books (with the exception of WW, D&D, GURPS and maybe Rifts) is quite a feat.

The problem with the industry from a business standpoint is that once you've sold your corebooks, nobody really needs anything else. Like you say, some time, some imagination and some paper will supply the rest.

Getting mad at, say, AEG beause they pump out a new book every three months is kind of silly, imo. Besides, nobody is forcing you to buy them.;)



I think the on-line RPG's and the pen and paper ones will, however, remian clearly divided. On-line games focus on the cheap kicks of RPG's (hacking monsters and getting treasure), but miss the best part of pen and paper games... namely the narrative storytelling skills, the face to face interplay between people, and the freedom to invent your own universe with no more tools than a pencil and a sheet of A4.

Well, i think we're going to see a lot of that changing pretty soon. We've already gotten some rather primitive tools in regards to the freedom to invent your own universe with regard to Neverwinter Nights. I'm placing emphasis on primitive; the DM tools are rather difficult to get any good with for the average joe. I do agree with the face to face element, but that may change quite soon as people start using more and more a/v chat in their games, for example.

Kage2020
24-12-2005, 04:01
There has been a move to short-lived online gaming, though. They have been increasingly common, if somewhat tedious. I'm wondering whether PbIM moderated by, say, Screen Monkey can go someway to bridging the gaps...

Kage

hairyman
28-12-2005, 09:40
Getting mad at, say, AEG beause they pump out a new book every three months is kind of silly, imo. Besides, nobody is forcing you to buy them.;)


Nah, doesn't make me mad, it's just a bit of a turn off to be confronted by a big library of source books. As I said, I totally understand why they do it, though.

I think if pen and paper games are going to survive in any diversity they'll probably do it as homegrown and open source. As you say, you just can't run a business off them unless you're one of the big few games, but (hopefully) people will still want to put out their systems and settings for others to read and play without making a business out of it.


We've already gotten some rather primitive tools in regards to the freedom to invent your own universe with regard to Neverwinter Nights.

I get what your saying, and I imagine in ten or twenty years time they'll be tools for designing worlds far exceeding the depth of Morrowind or whatever. I just don't think they'll replicate the point of pen and paper games, which (IMO) is to have the world imagined in your head as you play, not pixilated in front of you. They may well spawn a whole new genre of RPG's with immersive on line worlds with the idea of the GM as an intermediary removed, but it's the very act of having that GM describing and running things that I love about pen & paper games.

I would champion the advance of complex on-line rpg's, but I guess at the same time I would fiercely defend pen and paper games as a seperate entity worth playing in their own right. It's sort of like the difference between a film and a book (I think..... ish... maybe.....).

Nkari
28-12-2005, 11:14
nah.. Good ol Pen n Paper RPG will never die, since you can do so much in them. Problem is time for everyone.. =)

f2k
28-12-2005, 13:02
I donít think that RPGs are going the way of the dinos. I just think that they need to find a new place for themselves in a world dominated by computer gamesÖ

Myself? I havenít gamed for nearly 10 years now. Why? Several factorsÖ

- The regular group spilt up and went their separate ways.
- Itís very difficult to establish a new stabile group.
- Itís hard to find the time to attend uni, paint figures and role-play.
- The cost is scaring people away. Seriously, even GURPS, who used to champion the ďone book is all you needĒ cause, have gone the way of TSR. New books just keep on coming. And while hardback is very nice and all, the added cost isnítÖ
- Nobody seems to be willing to DM a campaign. Yes, I know itís a lot of work, I used to DM several campaigns with my old group, but someone has to do it. And right now, I simply donít have the time to do it myself.

Kage2020
28-12-2005, 18:01
Well, to be honest 'Net-based plagiariasm and resource sharing moderates the cost somewhat. Not that I'm advocating it, I just know that it goes on.

(Just to state that I have numerous GURPS scans on my computer, but have also purchased each and every book that I've got a scan of. As a GM it is just convenient not to have to take every darned book with you!)

The way around this can be seen in new and developing technologies. Consider the forthcoming commercial advent of "digital paper" and the potential it has for 'modernising' the publishing industry.

Kage

Wiseman
29-12-2005, 10:02
id say RPG's isnt dieing, more evolving into the MMORPG we now have

hairyman
29-12-2005, 10:17
@f2k... yeah, there are innumerable problems with getting a game going and then keeping it going. Oddly, we have a different problem to you, in that at least three of our group of five want to GM games.

I'd still say RPG's are different (and far superior ;) ) to MMORP's... MMORPG's are a fusion of RPG's and FPS PC games, rather than RPG's evolving into MMORPG's, if than makes any sense (too many acronyms!).

I also have a load of pdf's kicking about, but there's really no substitute for a nice hardback book with juvenile pictures of scantily clad barbarians on it.

I think RPG's may well continue to change and become more pretentious (White Wolf games) and less simple and fun (Rune Quest) as they try to find a niche in the overall world of geekdom and hang on to it. If monster bashing is going to become the preserve of MMORPG's, then I guess the only way pen and paper games is going to go is up their own **** in a blaze of storytelling and amateur dramatics. I love the narrative and the acting required for RPG's, but it is best when it comes naturally and not when it's forced through a narrow yet overwhelmingly detailed view of what a game should be about.

Thinking about it, one of my problems with all the sourcebooks that get released is that it removes one of the best bits of pen & paper games... namely making stuff up yourself. All the best games I've run or played in refused to use off the shelf campaign settings, background or characters, and they all grew beyond the system to encompass our own homebrew tailor made rules. I worry this won't happen if there's a sourcebook for everything (but I can totally understand why so many books get released for a successful system).

Brandir
29-12-2005, 10:35
RPGs are definitely going through a rough patch. There are a few lines that seem to be doing well (White Wolf and WFRP spring to mind) but overall sales are going down.

Why?

Perhaps because the RPG market has become so fragmented. The d20 OGL did provide a bit of a boost to the industry and enabled many companies to produce goods without restrictive licences. But the rise of the net and ease of producing RPGs (books and ebooks) means that there are many more different systems these days.

During the 'Golden Era' there were fewer systems and each system required fewer books. It is a little off-putting to find that one needs armfuls of books to play a game - it used to be the case one bought a single publication for a gaming world (I'm thinking Greyhawk here). Now it seems to me that you need 4 - 5 books to get the same information.

The obvious effect of computer games is also significant, especially as these online RPGs have become extremely sophisticated.

The changing lifestyles of people may be influential. RPGs can be very time consuming in an era of instant gratification.

I became interested in this hobby via RPGs (Basic D&D then AD&D and Traveller). GW's development of wargames led me down that path and I played very few RPGs since 1990 or so.

But, when WFRP came out early this year, I decided to try and run an RPG session at my local club. I did think that no-one would be interested, being of the opinion that RPGs were dead and I was just a relic from the past. But I was very far off the mark. The sessions proved extremely popular and we now play RPGs on a regular basis.

I have always prefered skirmish type wargames, particularly those with campaign systems (Mordheim, Blood Bowl and LOTR Battle Companies spring to mind). These are semi-RPGs and their ongoing popularity indicates to me that there are many many gamers willing to give RPGs a try.

So, my opinion is now that many wargamers are actually frustrated RPGers.

In the immortal words of that Kevin Costner film 'arrange a RPG session and they will come'.

f2k
29-12-2005, 11:05
@hairyman: Three? You said ďthreeĒ?! Lucky gitÖ :eek:

Itís not that I donít enjoy being a DM (in fact, I think itís one of the best part of RPGing), but I just canít find the time right now. And I canít find anyone who can be bothered to do it insteadÖ

I too feel that RPG and MMORPG are two very different things. While I enjoy playing Guild Wars, I miss the fun of playing with people. Sitting in the same room with just a few candles for illumination, munching chips, drinking coke and rolling the dice from sundown to the early morning. Ahh, memoriesÖ :p

hairyman
29-12-2005, 11:26
Yeah, I spent the last ten or fifteen years being the only person who was willing to run a game, and suddenly there's several other players who now fancy a shot. I'm enjoying playing again, but it's kind of weird not being at the helm. I miss the power..... ;)

Lord Lucifer
07-01-2006, 04:44
But, when WFRP came out early this year, I decided to try and run an RPG session at my local club. I did think that no-one would be interested, being of the opinion that RPGs were dead and I was just a relic from the past. But I was very far off the mark. The sessions proved extremely popular and we now play RPGs on a regular basis.
Since early last year, RPGs have stolen a disproportionately large amount of my time.
Running D&D3.5 and WFRP2
Playing primarily in two groups, one that got me into it, and the other an association of players from my wargames club
I was concerned I wouldn't find any interest from my club members for roleplaying, but shockingly about 10 people all jumped on the chance to take part in a game of D&D, and I managed to get some character background from quite a few of them which has helped me. Frankly shocked at the overwhelmingly enthusiastic response.
And, as predicted, they took to WFRP like ducks to water.
The group that got me into roleplaying, play D&D. A few of them have taken a shining to WFRP, which again was a suprise to me. But a few refuse to play WFRP with the claim that it's 'boring' :rolleyes: which boils down to D20 fanboyism* and a love of generic high fantasy

From the look of hobby stores around me, roleplaying is well supported... provided it's D&D or a D20 derivative.
Mixed minds about it myself, D20 apparently boosting the roleplaying hobby, but again the 'brand loyalty' symptom the system breeds chokes a lot of variety out of the hobby as a whole, due to lack of popular support.


I haven't been in the roleplaying hobby long enough to judge the state of its' health, but I hope it sticks around for a long time. I need to get through The Enemy Within :D




*look at the Black Industries blog...

Jo Bennett
07-01-2006, 14:39
No sign of RPing dying round my way. I do have the advantage of being at a university with a thriving RP society, which may account for some of it. We have 5-6 games running every Tuesday and Thursday in term time (so you have a ten session campaign, 3-4 hour sessions). We have about half the members GMing from time to time, and pull in new members at freshers fair every year. If you have a university near you, I recommend trying their RP society, most will let non-students join.

zeekphreak
07-01-2006, 15:48
As others have said not dead, just in a slump. I think it was to the fact that it they are trying to compete with video games, Television and other things that happen in normal life. To give an example of this I want to present the story of one friend of mine.

1999, I am in my junior year in highschool. I met the aformentioned friend in a Civics class. We were both into video games, and other "geeky" things. With the hype of Star Wars Episode I already buzzing around this time we got to talking the one day how fun would it be to be characters in Star Wars. Well a few weeks later he calls me up and we get to hanging out. He tells me he found something that he wants to play. Im thinking its a new game or something. When I arrive I see the "Star Wars roleplaying game" (this was the one by West End Games, Wizards had yet to acquire the liscense) As soon as we toss the dice, we are hooked. We jumped around other games, Vampire, Werewolf, D&D we soon bring other friends into it, and it becomes a once a week thing.
Fast forward to last year. He leaves for the Airforce. I had already gone away to college out of state for two years and returned. Everyone in our "group" has either moved on, gotten married or enrolled in college themselves. Well turns out there are RP geeks in the Armed Forces as well. Soon he is dating a very nice girl and gets a J.O.P. marriage before moving to Virginia, his next duty station. She is currently waiting to get reclassed so she can join him there. Now being that we still, when we either get a visit, (or soon) go to visit usually end up getting a game of something together. Its not as regular (not once a week like it was) but it still happens. I think this might be the biggest folly of traditional tabletop RPGs. Since its a "social" game, and people get into a group that they are comfortable with , then everyone gets older and real life starts to take precedence. Unfortunately its a normal fact of life that people are going to grow up. Most of us now play World of Warcraft, and try to schedule time to roleplay online whenever possible.

der_lex
10-01-2006, 19:04
I guess you just have to be lucky enough to find a decent group of players.

In high school, I lived in a relatively small city (35000 people or so), but I played D&D every week, with me and a buddy alternating our campaigns every week.

When I went to college I went to a proper city (100.000+ people...proper city for the low countries) yet couldn't find a good group for years...

Fortunately, I got introduced to a group by a friend, we connected well, and we've been playing together for over a year now... (the same group introduced me to Warhammer as well, incidentally)
There's a whopping 4 campaigns going on, two run by him, two run by me. The reason why we each run two is that we have a big playing group (six to seven people, depending on the campaign) and we each run a very player-driven 'main' campaign that runs into trouble when too many players are absent. Thus, we each have a light 'side campaign' as well to run when there are fewer players.

I think it's always been a niche hobby anyway (like WH ) and you just have to get lucky as far as finding players are concerned...

Azazel
22-01-2006, 04:01
Is Roleplaying a dieing hobby?

Yes. Some day no one will take part in Roleplaying games.