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dodicula
27-01-2009, 09:00
I am about half way done with my Imperial Fists, and am planning out the standard bearer. For the motto I want to use Mike Tyson's famous line:


"Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."

But I want to make it sound real classy like...so I would like to translate it into latin.

Does anyone have any idea how to write this?
I looked at an online translator...but no luck:

Sulum has a intentio exaro they adepto punched in os

primarchvulken
27-01-2009, 09:11
Well this isnt in latin but how about "everyone is prepared until they suffer a blow" or
"any man will fight willingy untill they see the enemy" same meaning but a bit off.

Nero
27-01-2009, 09:13
Sulum ex intentio exaro illud adepto ledo in oris

...is the best I can come up with. I don't think you can do a literal word-for-word translation into Latin, a little bit of inventiveness is called for.

I don't speak latin, by the way. That was done with an online translator too.

dookie
27-01-2009, 16:25
with a signiture like that, why dont you just quit the hobby all together and do something more constructive with your time?

RCgothic
27-01-2009, 17:19
Haven't had time to properly grammaticise it, but something along the lines of:

Omnis Milites Consilium Habeo, Dum Offendo In Os.

(All soldiers have a plan, until struck in the mouth.)

MrP
27-01-2009, 17:28
Quisque consilium habet, donec in ricto percuteret.

Or something pretty close to that. I'm a little rusty, so I'm not totally happy with in ricto. But it's closer than anything GW has ever managed! ;)

dodicula
27-01-2009, 17:33
Haven't had time to properly grammaticise it, but something along the lines of:

Omnis Milites Consilium Habeo, Dum Offendo In Os.

(All soldiers have a plan, until struck in the mouth.)

I think thats enough, it is Imperial Gothic, not true Latin, after all.
Quick Question:
How about:
Omnis Milites Consilium Habeo, Dum Inflixi In Os.

Ubermensch Commander
27-01-2009, 17:36
AH I see! Playing the Redneck Legion. Go forth and do much punching in the face then!

Damocles8
27-01-2009, 17:38
I think thats enough, it is Imperial Gothic, not true Latin, after all.
Quick Question:
How about:
Omnis Milites Consilium Habeo, Dum Inflixi In Os.

Organize it however you like...only the endings on the words matter.....

Laser guided fanatic
27-01-2009, 19:03
Romanes eunt domus.

Seriously for Imperial language i think you just have to take english and make it sound latin. e.g. The cat sat on the mat, translates into imperial as: Felinos satos onos theos mattos

LawrencePhillips
28-01-2009, 08:36
I do love this quote and those it's drived from. It's usually used as an excuse for being ill prepared for a fight but it's actually taken from ancient chinese proverbs.

It be put in full; it states that tactics are not static but must adapt to the enemy and the changing battlefield. It does not mean, having a plan up front is pointless. It means being unable to adapt your plan in battle is the mark of a poor tactician.

Imperialis_Dominatus
28-01-2009, 08:49
Brings to mind the old adage that states that no plan survives contact with the enemy.

MrBigMr
28-01-2009, 09:00
Here's something to chew on:
http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Latin_proverbs

Alea iacta est - The die is cast.

Lord Solar Plexus
28-01-2009, 09:08
I think thats enough, it is Imperial Gothic, not true Latin, after all.
Quick Question:
How about:
Omnis Milites Consilium Habeo, Dum Inflixi In Os.

'Omnis Milites' is plural I gather, so the verb form should be 'habent' (they have) since 'habeo' is 'I have'. I think. ;)

'Inflixi' sounds as if it was present perfect but it has not yet happened and it is passive. I'd change it to 'inflictum erunt'.

Is 'os' accusativus locativus ('where are they hit')? I don't know... ;)

MrP
28-01-2009, 10:57
'Omnis Milites' is plural I gather, so the verb form should be 'habent' (they have) since 'habeo' is 'I have'. I think. ;)

'Inflixi' sounds as if it was present perfect but it has not yet happened and it is passive. I'd change it to 'inflictum erunt'.

Is 'os' accusativus locativus ('where are they hit')? I don't know... ;)

omnes milites, old boy, and inflicterentur (imperfect passive subjunctive), I think. ;) Would one use a locative for being punched in the face? I can't recall my Latin well enough, I confess. I really must brush up! :o

precinctomega
28-01-2009, 12:59
As MrP illustrates beautifully, the expression in grammatically-correct Latin is pretty incomprehensible to non-Latin-speakers.

Omnia strategum habes, dum in mandibulum inflictate est.

It's not Latin, but it conforms a little closer to what a non-Latin-speaker might be able to work out and, IMO, flows a little smoother.

R.

MrP
28-01-2009, 21:39
As MrP illustrates beautifully, the expression in grammatically-correct Latin is pretty incomprehensible to non-Latin-speakers.

Omnia strategum habes, dum in mandibulum inflictate est.

It's not Latin, but it conforms a little closer to what a non-Latin-speaker might be able to work out and, IMO, flows a little smoother.

R.

Aye, I think you're right. The faux-Latin suggestions on this page look much more GW than does the real deal. Not to mention that mentioning passive subjunctives is the Classicist's version of a sleeping draught. ;)