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crandall87
02-03-2009, 13:53
I expected Crippler to have posted this before me but anyways we buy a lot of our stock from him and today we placed an order and Crippler emailed us saying.


Craig, Afternoon, I am afraid I have some bad news for you. GW have recently in there wisdom updated their policies, which now only allow us to place one order a week, no matter what amounts.

I have already argued the point with them and they will not budge. What with the release of the super heavies, I have had to place the order this morning.

This will mean a delay in your order till next Monday when I can place the order, really sorry about this but unfortunately my hands are tired mate.

I hope Crippler doesn't mind me posting that but I thought I would point out that once again GW have changed their policy with another baffling rule.

Do they think that by making online retailers slower and less efficent people will buy from them directly more? Do they not realise that this is more likely to actually lose them money instead? Idiots.

Condottiere
02-03-2009, 14:26
Maybe they have reduced staff, so it is an attempt to simplify administration. Doesn't mean they wouldn't have other motives.

Brinnyunlimited
02-03-2009, 14:31
It's about efficiency.

The trade team at GW is quite small. The minimum spend for a GW trade accounts is £100 (which is a very small amount - I've dealt with companies before that required minimum spends in the thousands).

By limiting the number of orders indies can place in the week, it allows the trade team at GW to work far more efficiently. What's easier to process? 7 orders per week of £120 each or one big order per week for £840? It also saves them a shedload on courier fees too.

The only kind of retailer that this change will effect are the drop-shippers - companies who don't hold any stock and simply act as an unessecary middleman for people buying Games Workshop products. Businesses who hold a sufficient level of stock (which in my opinion, they ALL should do) won't have a problem.

Games Workshop have some of the most flexible trade policies I've ever encountered from a supplier and have one of the most friendly sales teams to boot. Try and use a bit of common sense before moaning.

EmperorNorton
02-03-2009, 14:39
The only kind of retailer that this change will effect are the drop-shippers - companies who don't hold any stock and simply act as an unessecary middleman for people buying Games Workshop products.

How exactly are they an unnecessary middleman?
They would be, if GW were to let me buy directly from them with a 25% discount, but they don't now, do they?

Brinnyunlimited
02-03-2009, 15:01
How exactly are they an unnecessary middleman?
They would be, if GW were to let me buy directly from them with a 25% discount, but they don't now, do they?

You could buy from them direct for a 35% discount if you wanted. All you have to do is make a minimum spend of £100 and say you're a business retailer. Fraudulent, yes, but not much more fraudulent than the plethora of internet only "indies" who run their business from their house and hold next to no stock at all.

Rick Blaine
02-03-2009, 15:09
One order per week sounds reasonable to me. If you need more, it's your own fault for not carrying enough stock.

Brinnyunlimited
02-03-2009, 15:11
By the way, for anyone who do think this policy change is completely unreasonable, maybe you should look at the competition?

The UK distributor of Privateer Press and Rackham will not deal with indies who do not own a brick & mortar retail store.

The makers of Flames of War explicitly state that no indie may offer more than a 10% discount on the RRP of their items.

Imagine how you'd feel if GW implemented trade terms like those? Indies only being able to place one order per week would be the least of your worries then.

zedeyejoe
02-03-2009, 15:14
Do they think that by making online retailers slower and less efficent people will buy from them directly more? Do they not realise that this is more likely to actually lose them money instead? Idiots.

Knocking the other internet stockists out of the ring would indeed be the reason for it. Imagine you are the managers of GW, what good does having other internet stores do? So you aim to have people buy direct from you, you then get the whole retail value of the sale at no discount.

Those who will be particularly hard hit by this will be internet sellers using Just In Time (don't order stock until you have an order for it). If you only make 10% on a sale you just cannot afford to maintain stock in the hope that it might sell.

It might just be possible to stop GW from doing this, after all the law trumps GW, so if there is a law against it, they would have to stop doing it.

Bookwrak
02-03-2009, 15:17
Why would there be a law against it? They're not doing anything wrong.

I expected Crippler to have posted this before me but anyways we buy a lot of our stock from him and today we placed an order and Crippler emailed us saying.



I hope Crippler doesn't mind me posting that but I thought I would point out that once again GW have changed their policy with another baffling rule.

Do they think that by making online retailers slower and less efficent people will buy from them directly more? Do they not realise that this is more likely to actually lose them money instead? Idiots.
No, I think you're making a mountain out of a molehill. They're streamlining their ordering procedures, not putting someone's nuts in a vice. How exactly is this change 'a baffling rule?'

Earthbeard
02-03-2009, 15:32
Why would there be a law against it? They're not doing anything wrong.

No, I think you're making a mountain out of a molehill. They're streamlining their ordering procedures, not putting someone's nuts in a vice. How exactly is this change 'a baffling rule?'

Fully agreed.

blongbling
02-03-2009, 16:08
You could buy from them direct for a 35% discount if you wanted. All you have to do is make a minimum spend of £100 and say you're a business retailer. Fraudulent, yes, but not much more fraudulent than the plethora of internet only "indies" who run their business from their house and hold next to no stock at all.

no account unless you meet the criteria for a store, internet of otherwise..if you do then fine, if you dont, you get nothing.

t-tauri
02-03-2009, 16:11
What they're doing is moving the onus for keeping stock onto the internet retailers. Instead of GW holding all the stock and shipping out daily to internet retailers as the retailers sold goods the retailers will either have to hold stock or delay shipping orders. Both of those will hit the retailers margins and reduce GW's shipping bill.

Clearly some retailers must have been making the minimum order almost daily to keep their stockholding down and costing GW more in courier charges. I doubt there's a law against only accepting one order per week. GW's shipping terms have probably changed and by making the order you accept their trade terms. As long as those are reasonable and legal-payment in blood and first born children accepted, pound of flesh as deposit-then there's little you can do.

zedeyejoe
02-03-2009, 16:51
Why would there be a law against it? They're not doing anything wrong.

Ah, that might not be true. Certainly I have worked for businesses that supply companies that work using JIT methods (car plants being one category). They would be deeply unhappy to be told they can order only once a week/month or whenever.

Unless a particular day is specified (all orders on Wednesdays for example) it is obvious that GW could take orders whenever they wanted, its just that they choose not to. If that choosing is to damage/limit other traders that could be against EU law. The fine for that is up to 10% of your turnover for up to 3 years.

Indeed once you have sold stuff to a customer, you have no control over the price they charge for it, they can even give it away. So I don't know why Battlefront have included that in their terms, in fact in the copy of the terms I signed, there was no mention of a restriction on prices. So Urban Myth?

Brother Loki
02-03-2009, 18:10
In most cases though, a supplier to a JIT manufacturer is much smaller than that manufacturer, and typically the manufacturer is their main if not only customer. There are whole companies who exist to make a single component of a Toyota car, for example. This is a very different situation. A big supplier (GW) has until been meeting the cost of constantly fulfilling tiny orders from lots of internet deep discounters who essentially hold no stock. GW uses TNT (or at least they did a couple of years ago) and a minimum order probably costs them about £10 to ship. That's a pretty hefty chunk of their profit gone.

If these internet only stores have to actually maintain some stock holding to provide fast turnarounds and good service, all it does is put them in a closer situation to the real businesses - i.e. the local games shops - that they've been happily undercutting for the last few years. I can't get upset about that.

ToXin
02-03-2009, 18:14
Things may have changed over the (past 17) years, but...

when I worked in GW retail outlets the STORE could only place a re-stock order once per week, so on occasion we would be out of stock if a particular item sold more than anticipated. We were also only supposed to hold 1 box of each blister in the store room - i.e. a rack of 6 (blisters on a peg) on the shelf and 12 in the back.

As a side note, the manager also placed a rather large order the week before our 'grand opening' and had a call from head office cancelling most of the 'excessive' inventory... funny that the next week the store was sold out of 2/3 of the items (for a week and half - see re-stock policy above) and we could have sold many more boxes on the Saturday - people surprised we had sold out of all boxed games by just after lunch! :D

JohnnyFoxton
02-03-2009, 19:49
Do they think that by making online retailers slower and less efficent people will buy from them directly more? Do they not realise that this is more likely to actually lose them money instead? Idiots.

Oh, boo hoo. Retailers will now have to hold sufficient stock levels rather than only order when enough customers have placed orders. This is a bad thing, why exactly?

All it'll mean is the indies who value their customer service will have to hold stock - thus get it delivered to customers quicker and more efficiently. I know we all like to get digs into GW whenever possible, but this is actually a GOOD business decision, in my opinion.

rich1231
02-03-2009, 20:03
An average box (not order) that GW send us contains approx £400 worth of Stock. There is no penalty to them cost wise for shipping more boxes, or if there is it is minor.

There is an overhead though for each order taken by their trade sales people. If 150 indies place an order a day then the Trade guys are snowed under all the time.

We place multiple orders day some days and are pretty sure have helped focus the minds of GW Trade on the issue.

We think this is a brilliant move though, we were moving to a weekly ordering process in anycase as the daily arrival of large numbers of boxes was delaying order processing. We decided before xmas to move to a full stockholding store and this just means we have to do it faster. It will also mean same day dispatch eventually for all orders which we are desperate to achieve.

If you look at the "about us" page on our site you will see an indication of the stock levels we have been building.. The issue is that with such a large range of items it is very very very very difficult to ensure the right number of each item is in stock. For example one week we might sell no Blisters of Necron Flayed ones and the next week over 100, but to hold 100+ of each Blister would be insane.

And the agressive pricing in this market does not lead to high stock level models as there is likely insufficient margin in most stores being generated to grow stock.

zedeyejoe
02-03-2009, 20:13
Oh, boo hoo. Retailers will now have to hold sufficient stock levels rather than only order when enough customers have placed orders. This is a bad thing, why exactly?

Their costs will increase (money invested in stock). Personally if I was selling as an on-line discounter (which I don't do), I would just order what was needed as the orders come in. Means that people have to wait a bit longer for their orders but they still get the stuff cheap. So don't have to increase costs, just slow deliveries.

Speed of delivery can be improved somewhat by keeping track of customer orders and having enough stock to meet the demand for popular items.

So no big problem, its doable with a bit of thought.

rich1231
02-03-2009, 20:18
Ah, that might not be true. Certainly I have worked for businesses that supply companies that work using JIT methods (car plants being one category). They would be deeply unhappy to be told they can order only once a week/month or whenever.

Unless a particular day is specified (all orders on Wednesdays for example) it is obvious that GW could take orders whenever they wanted, its just that they choose not to. If that choosing is to damage/limit other traders that could be against EU law. The fine for that is up to 10% of your turnover for up to 3 years.

Indeed once you have sold stuff to a customer, you have no control over the price they charge for it, they can even give it away. So I don't know why Battlefront have included that in their terms, in fact in the copy of the terms I signed, there was no mention of a restriction on prices. So Urban Myth?

its naughty but lots of people do it

BrotherOfBrass
02-03-2009, 20:19
This is interesting... Seems to be a sound business move on behalf of GW but raises a choice for their customers. I'm pretty time rich, but cash poor, so I will continue to use online stores that offer a decent discount, even if it means waiting longer. This is a choice that other players have to make; go to GW direct and get your stuff toot-sweet, or wait a week and save a couple of quid.

Pacific
03-03-2009, 00:14
Aye, but its often more than just a couple of quid you save ordering online. I'm really amazed that anyone buys from the stores now at all, barring small things such as paints.

marv335
03-03-2009, 10:25
go to GW direct and get your stuff toot-sweet, or wait a week and save a couple of quid.

It's worth pointing out that either way GW still make a profit.
There is no-one else making their stuff, so with the exception of second hand stuff from trading or ebay, anything you buy online GW will get their cut.
In fact they make more money off the online retailers than from their own shops.

Korras
03-03-2009, 11:59
It's worth pointing out that either way GW still make a profit.
There is no-one else making their stuff, so with the exception of second hand stuff from trading or ebay, anything you buy online GW will get their cut.
In fact they make more money off the online retailers than from their own shops.

except that their cut will be larger if you buy it from their own website. yeah, I know, wages and the like get substracted from that, but other retailers have that problem, too.

also, I recently placed a 100 pound order with wayland games. the same order would have costed me quite some more from GW itself. for that difference, I'll gladly wait a week longer. it's not like I've got a lack of stuff to assemble, let alone paint.

zedeyejoe
03-03-2009, 13:18
In fact they make more money off the online retailers than from their own shops.

Different things (physical shop and webshop). All a webshop is is a collection point for orders. If someone can make a profit buying the stuff and selling at a discount, you can be certain that GW would make more selling it themselves and getting the full retail price for the sale.

I like the idea of indie shops who find new customers but people who trade solely online, no I don't see any advantage for a business in those. In fact I have heard stories of people who learnt the game in a shop, bought their figures online and then turned up at the shop with their new stuff asking for help with painting it. A shopkeeper is worthy of their hire (to change an old saying). Want help with your gaming and painting, contact the etailer and see what they can do for you!

But the above is about the hobby, there are laws in Europe that may prevent certain courses of action, no matter how laudable they might be.

yabbadabba
03-03-2009, 15:54
WE FEAR CHANGE! WE FEAR CHANGE! Quick, grab the pitchforks and storm GWHQ - they are doing something we don't understand!


They would be, if GW were to let me buy directly from them with a 25% discount, but they don't now, do they?

Of course not because that would be incredibly stupid.


This is a choice that other players have to make; go to GW direct and get your stuff toot-sweet, or wait a week and save a couple of quid.

On the ball mate. If I want something now, then it is down to the nearest stockist and get it - even if it needs a bit of cash thrown at it. If I have the time to wait then why not get it cheaper elsehwere with a bit of shopping around.

Aside from a slight prejudicing against certain types of online traders (who, as Zedeyejoe suggested, just need to change their tac's), I can think of no logical sales decision to do this, so it must be a cost efficiency/ new terms reason. So, no problem, a slight discomfort and then nobody will notice.

Fred_Scuttle
03-03-2009, 20:49
I ( we ) are a small FLGS in Michigan. I have no problem with this move by GW. What it may do is prune the branches of the numerous Internet based drop shippers that do not stock on hand and just drop ship - which in my opinion is a good thing. The bigger Net Based stores will remain, and still be able to provide GW product at 25-35% off that you see now.

But the 'Hey - I have room in my basement - let's set up a store!' web sites may start to fade away. I have nothing personally against them, but they also add nothing to the core gaming community and or GW's bottom line. ( Assuming - as I do - that in the aggragate any sales not going through them will go through The War Store, etc. )

I don't expect this to increase our sales - nothing more than a few items every couple months perhaps as people see their favorite drop shipper can't get an order done and they have not yet found another mail order house. Again - I think this will be good in the end for the GW brand and the community in general, I'm not viewing this through the drawer of our cash register.

About 85% of our orders are once a week'ers, and we don't see that changing in the forseeable future. I know from experience that getting through to GW Trade can be a bit touch and go at times - just from their call - contact volume.

I would not have pushed or fought for this - but as it's happening - I think it's a good thing.

Fred

warrenthewindmill
11-03-2009, 19:19
We've been trading for the last 5 years and seen drop shippers come and go so reckon this move can only be good for webstores that hold stock. Not only will it make life more difficult for stores that don't hold stock, it will also mean fewer new stores start up as drop shipping is no longer an option.

It's not difficult to set up stock levels to model demand. In our case we have five years sales experience to draw on. You can't guarantee that someone won't order 20 units of plague monks, but it doesn't happen very often!!

My information is that the only impact of this change will be on internet traders. Virtually no B&M stores place more than one trade order per week. Coming soon after GW said they would only give trade accounts to internet retailers with a unique URL (designed to hit eBay, Amazon et al) its clear they want to reduce transactions with drop shippers.

It will have an impact on their shipping costs. Five small trade orders a week cost much more than one and reduce their margin. More importantly, they are not helping deep discounters to take the business away from their own website. We sit somewhere in the middle. We can't match the 20%+ that some webstores offer (our standard discount is 15%,) although this is impacted by shipping costs. We charge a fixed £2.99 in the UK and most other sites charge at cost which, for example, will add £4.20 to the cost of a Black Reach game.

The deep discounters will go one of two ways. Either they move to a stock holding model, which means they will increase their costs and almost certainly have to increase prices to maintain any sort of profit margin. Alternatively they will have to advertise a possible 2 week delivery time to take account of the orders taken after they have placed their weekly order.

We've done the sums, and anything more than the discount we offer with a warehouse rental and the cash tied up in stock is simply not sustainable.

The next few months should be very interesting.

hertz
11-03-2009, 22:26
One bit of fact: I know for sure about a few "brick and Mortar" stores in my country that does place an order with GW twice a week.

Brandir
11-03-2009, 22:46
Lets just add a few bits of law to the discussion. Please bear in mind that this post talks about how EU law is implemented in the UK.

EU legislation means that suppliers and distributors cannot impose ways of selling on retailers, just as they cannot insist retailers charge RRP. There are exceptions, but these are written into the EU regulations. The one exception I know of is perfume

In the UK the authorities are quite strict with this.

How do I know this? Well, I asked our legal department.

Essentially the Competition Act 1998, which was enacted as a result of the Maastricht and Amsterdam treaties, governs how companies trade in the UK.

There are four parts to this Act that prevent companies carrying out anti-competitive behaviour.

Companies cannot:
-agree to fix prices or terms of trade, for example agreeing price rises with competitors
-limit production in order to reduce competition
-carve up markets or suppliers, for example agreeing with a competitor that they will bid for one contract and they’ll take another
-discriminate between customers, for example charging different prices or imposing different terms where there is no difference in what they’re supplying.

The Enterprise Act 2002 clarified these powers and created the Office of Fair Trading to police the regulations and ensure UK companies were competitive.

Hence GW must supply online only retailers in the UK.

For information Battlefront, producers of Flames of War, state that a retailer must have a real shop. That is illegal under the Competition Act but they managed to get away with it as they were based and supplied from NZ. However, they now have a UK distribution centre so must obey this act.

Of course, as I am not a solicitor none of the above can be construed as legal advice. Go see your own solicitor and don't quote me

Wintertooth
11-03-2009, 23:07
Hence GW must supply online only retailers in the UK.

Right. But I don't see anything there to say they can't introduce a rule that applies equally to all their trade customers, but which hurts the online-only retailers disproportionately. Not their problem if Jimmy Dropship doesn't have a stockroom/warehouse. Equal terms for all.

zedeyejoe
11-03-2009, 23:09
Brandir, well said. Those Acts can indeed be looked up on the internet (documents exist at the office of fair trading site) and they do say that. So if anyone did want to complain, the info is all there.

warrenthewindmill
11-03-2009, 23:31
Very few B&M stores order more than once a week. I didn't say that none do. GW are not imposing different terms on internet stores. their own shops only take one order per week.

Even if they did discriminate who can afford to take on a big company? Battlefront and other smaller companies get away with it. You have to be able to finance the law and few small companies can do this. My experience of GW is really positive. They support businesses with a professional approach.

zedeyejoe
12-03-2009, 09:25
Even if they did discriminate who can afford to take on a big company?

The government. Its the old thing, break the law and the government jumps up and down on you.

Griefbringer
12-03-2009, 09:39
Unless a particular day is specified (all orders on Wednesdays for example) it is obvious that GW could take orders whenever they wanted, its just that they choose not to. If that choosing is to damage/limit other traders that could be against EU law.

However, if they apply equal and reasonable ordering terms to everybody (including their own retail stores), I see no basis to claim that this action would be in violation of EU competition legislation.

Considering the nature of the product, and that a lot of the retailers already order only once per week, the limitation of one order per week seems pretty reasonable to me. It should help to make the activity more cost-efficient, by cutting on the administrative and shipping costs.

marv335
12-03-2009, 11:27
After a look at those regulations, it seems to me that by restricting trade accounts to one order a week, they are actually complying with the rules.
Since the GW shops can only make one order a week, multiple orders for everyone else is unfair to their own shops by virtue of this legislation.
besides, most of that law doesn't seem to apply since there is only one supplier for GW stuff. They already have a legal monopoly. no-one else is competing with them in the strictest sense.

Griefbringer
12-03-2009, 13:42
besides, most of that law doesn't seem to apply since there is only one supplier for GW stuff.


Only one manufacturer, that is. However, I think that retailers at least in some countries have a choice of ordering straight from GW or from independent distributors.

zedeyejoe
12-03-2009, 14:02
Here you go folks


Abuse of dominant position

(1) Subject to section 19, any conduct on the part of one or more undertakings which amounts to the abuse of a dominant position in a market is prohibited if it may affect trade within the United Kingdom.

(2) Conduct may, in particular, constitute such an abuse if it consists in—

(a) directly or indirectly imposing unfair purchase or selling prices or other unfair trading conditions;

(b) limiting production, markets or technical development to the prejudice of consumers;

(c) applying dissimilar conditions to equivalent transactions with other trading parties, thereby placing them at a competitive disadvantage;

(d) making the conclusion of contracts subject to acceptance by the other parties of supplementary obligations which, by their nature or according to commercial usage, have no connection with the subject of the contracts.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts1998/ukpga_19980041_en_2#pt1-ch2-pb2-l1g18

Jo Bennett
12-03-2009, 15:58
The market for GW products will not be considered to be a separate market by the OFT, I'd be willing to put a tenner on that at least. They will be included in a wider market, possibly as wide as "toys and games", possibly something like model kits. Either way none of this competition stuff is going to fly.

Brinnyunlimited
12-03-2009, 21:33
Here you go folks



http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts1998/ukpga_19980041_en_2#pt1-ch2-pb2-l1g18

I still don't see how GW are in breach of this. Even GW's own stores are only allowed to place one order a week, so nobody is benefiting from this at an expense to any other.

If ONLY online stores were allowed to place one order a week, then fair enough. Legal problem. Seeing as it applies to ALL GW traders, including their own line of high street stores, it's not a problem. How is it any different from them setting a minimum order value of £100? Is that illegal too? Should I take them to court because as a retailer I want to place an order for £12 worth of stock?

GW are a multi-national, multi-million pound business. I'm pretty sure their own legal department know a bit more about trading laws than a bunch of nobodies on the internet.

ToXin
12-03-2009, 23:07
People seem to be obsessing on this one...

how about this: (theoretical, but doesn't brek any law)
"you can place as many orders as you like in any week but my policy is only to ship on a monday"

to sum up, if anyone is breaking any law it would already have been flagged, dealt with and any adjustments necessary made, we can all sleep easy at night.

yabbadabba
13-03-2009, 10:39
The government. Its the old thing, break the law and the government jumps up and down on you.

Not in the UK mate. If you're not contributing to their party funds AND you don't pay your taxes its big boot time. Everything else is negotiable ;)

rich1231
14-03-2009, 22:26
We've been trading for the last 5 years and seen drop shippers come and go so reckon this move can only be good for webstores that hold stock. Not only will it make life more difficult for stores that don't hold stock, it will also mean fewer new stores start up as drop shipping is no longer an option.

It's not difficult to set up stock levels to model demand. In our case we have five years sales experience to draw on. You can't guarantee that someone won't order 20 units of plague monks, but it doesn't happen very often!!

My information is that the only impact of this change will be on internet traders. Virtually no B&M stores place more than one trade order per week. Coming soon after GW said they would only give trade accounts to internet retailers with a unique URL (designed to hit eBay, Amazon et al) its clear they want to reduce transactions with drop shippers.

It will have an impact on their shipping costs. Five small trade orders a week cost much more than one and reduce their margin. More importantly, they are not helping deep discounters to take the business away from their own website. We sit somewhere in the middle. We can't match the 20%+ that some webstores offer (our standard discount is 15%,) although this is impacted by shipping costs. We charge a fixed £2.99 in the UK and most other sites charge at cost which, for example, will add £4.20 to the cost of a Black Reach game.

The deep discounters will go one of two ways. Either they move to a stock holding model, which means they will increase their costs and almost certainly have to increase prices to maintain any sort of profit margin. Alternatively they will have to advertise a possible 2 week delivery time to take account of the orders taken after they have placed their weekly order.

We've done the sums, and anything more than the discount we offer with a warehouse rental and the cash tied up in stock is simply not sustainable.

The next few months should be very interesting.


They get charged per box, so the only cost variable is the number of boxes sent. All on one day or another makes no difference. It does however allow GW to save from using Couriers to freight carriers carrying pallets on larger orders which is almost certainly cheaper. There are other costs related to processing orders and that is the advantaging to limiting to once a week.

Crazy Harborc
15-03-2009, 02:16
Gee, golly.....does that mean that GW will pass the savings onto their retail indie store owners???:rolleyes::D:D

ToXin
15-03-2009, 09:32
I suspect they arn't making savings but attempting to curb increasing costs...

Unless things have changed (which is quite probable since my experience) they always use curriers because of the 'local drop' nature of deliveries, no matter how large an order it's a number of boxes, not an artic full.

rich1231
15-03-2009, 11:47
I suspect they arn't making savings but attempting to curb increasing costs...

Unless things have changed (which is quite probable since my experience) they always use curriers because of the 'local drop' nature of deliveries, no matter how large an order it's a number of boxes, not an artic full.

Erm, we get them by Pallet and Logistics firms now.

7 Pallets this week which was fun.

warrenthewindmill
16-03-2009, 11:30
They get charged per box, so the only cost variable is the number of boxes sent. All on one day or another makes no difference.

I imagine there have been enough drop shippers out there placing minimum orders every day, which will probably all fit in one big box if placed in a weekly order. That will have a big impact if GW send one large box weekly instead of 5 smaller boxes daily.

Brandir
16-03-2009, 11:46
I wonder if GW have ever considered an affiliate scheme, say like the Amazon one?