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Icewalker
12-12-2005, 01:43
If you were to lose about 3/4 of all the blood in your body, what color would your skin be? Or rather, if you lost ALL the blood in your bloody, what color would your skin be THEN? I ask because I'm writing a morbid sci-fi story (as some of you may/mayn't know).

starlight
12-12-2005, 02:01
A very pale version of your normal skin tone.

BTW if you lose more than 40% you go into *decompensating shock* and without volume replacements (IVs) you'll die. <morbid medical trivia from a career in healthcare:D>

Wiseman
12-12-2005, 04:24
sure your writing a story, this is a return of what people use to do, use portent instead of a hospital.;)

TitusAndronicus
12-12-2005, 04:37
Past experience:

Koreans turn white and their skin looks like candle wax. Somalies turn a light greybrown color, almost a yellow but more grey. Yugoslavians looked greenish. It really depends I guess on your original coloration. I got hurt once and I turned a kind of pink waxy color and my lips turned blue, like the color of a blue sweet tart. Any of this help?

RElize however that it takes a HELL of a lot of blood loss for a person to bleed out like this. Usually they die of shock first, or organ damage.

arkbird
12-12-2005, 09:10
Most whites will turn a very very light grey as your body begins the decomp. process. 50% blood loss is in most cases fatal but there always exceptions to the rule.

Icewalker
12-12-2005, 14:42
And if the main character has 2 bionic limbs w/ oil (or a facsimile of oil) making them run, mixes w/ blood, what happens then? Oh yeah, the two arms have crap loads of connections to the brain to make them function better than normal human limbs. So if the oil in the in the 2 bionic arms mixed w/ the blood flowing through the guy's artificial veins, what would happen? Rather, what would he look like (assuming he's lost a crap load of blood, but is still alive and all)?

Xhalax
12-12-2005, 14:49
The thing is...you have to remember that your blood is only red when it comes into contact with air. That's why your viens and blue rather than read

C. Langana
12-12-2005, 15:39
sure your writing a story, this is a return of what people use to do, use portent instead of a hospital.;)
I miss those threads, if it helps I had a splinter earlier.


Icewalker: bionic bits, they'd probably twitch and spasm a lot but not much else, they wouldn't exactly be bleeding oil, course that depends on how their controlled.
If their just controlled via a plug into the brain, they won't be doing much. The brain will be deprived of Oxygen and generally out of it.
If their controlled via something like a line of nanobots in the bloodstream (ooh!) then I'd still make the Nanos separate in air, making them easier to muck about with in the lab. (Or even better coagulate V. quickly on contact with air. )

Titus: Thats interesting but remarkable, my generation doesn't realise how lucky it is sometimes.

So yeah Icewalker, your character will have two big silver arms and be whatever colour Titus says.

Arnizipal
12-12-2005, 17:59
The thing is...you have to remember that your blood is only red when it comes into contact with air. That's why your viens and blue rather than read
But blood transports (among other things) air through your body... :eyebrows:

C. Langana
12-12-2005, 18:16
Its still blue in the veins mate, don't ask me why.

Kohhna
12-12-2005, 19:16
And if the main character has 2 bionic limbs w/ oil (or a facsimile of oil) making them run, mixes w/ blood, what happens then? Oh yeah, the two arms have crap loads of connections to the brain to make them function better than normal human limbs. So if the oil in the in the 2 bionic arms mixed w/ the blood flowing through the guy's artificial veins, what would happen? Rather, what would he look like (assuming he's lost a crap load of blood, but is still alive and all)?
I'll go check.

*15 minutes of screaming and mechanical sawing/drilling noises later*

Apparently they die.

Mouldsta
12-12-2005, 19:21
Its still blue in the veins mate, don't ask me why.
IIRC from biology it's red when oxygenated (going away from the heart), and blue when returning. Thus half your veins will be blue and half will be red. Don't ask me why all the ones on the surface appear to be blue though, perhaps all the returning veins are closer to the surface.

C. Langana
12-12-2005, 19:30
Thats it. The blue ones are close to the skin because that means the bits before the cut will still get oxygen.

As in the red ones will have a lower chance of being cut.

Hlokk
12-12-2005, 19:43
Does blood have a direct influence on melanonin levels in the skin then?

I mean, if you loose blood and you go really pale, does your melononin level fall as well?

starlight
12-12-2005, 19:52
I'm sorry, but after 13+ years in health care, I have to ask.....do any of you actually have a clue what you're talking about?:wtf:

Blood is red. Blood is always red. Blood is not blue or any other colour. Blood does not change colours when in contact with air. As blood dries it darkens, but does not change colour.

Arterial (blood going *from* the heart) is highly oxygenated with many oxygen molecules attached to the hemoglobin, thus it is *bright* red. Venous blood (dark red) has exchanged the oxygen for carbon dioxide in the cells and is returning the CO2 to the lungs (eventually) to exchange it for oxygen and start the trip again.

Skin affects the colours of the underlying tissues (including veins), otherwise we'd mostly be bright red (the colour of oxygenated muscle) or yellowish (the colour of fat). Veins are closr to the surface becasue it was the most sensible evolutionary trait. It protected the important arteries by having them protected by layers of muscle and fat. Veins are not so important, thus having them closer to the surface isn't such a drawback.

When you give blood, it comes from your venous system (that would be the veins) and is obviously red when it comes out.:eyebrows: Bearing in mind that the vials used are called *Vacu-tainers* for a reason - the *vacuum* inside which sucks the blood out - we can see that the blood doesn't come into contact with air, yet is still red. Air contact would spoil the test, thus the sterile vacuum is essential.

Hlokk: No.

/medical lesson

C. Langana
12-12-2005, 19:56
I'm sorry, but after 13+ years in health care, I have to ask.....do any of you actually have a clue what you're talking about?:wtf:
No, we don't but I'm glad you put us right.
Fear me I am knowledge sponge.

starlight
12-12-2005, 20:09
Me too.:D That's why I'm trying to go back to Uni at my age.:D

Arnizipal
12-12-2005, 20:22
Blood is red. Blood is always red. Blood is not blue or any other colour. Blood does not change colours when in contact with air. As blood dries it darkens, but does not change colour.
Hah! I knew it! I just wasn't sure enough to post all smug about it. :p

Icewalker
12-12-2005, 22:45
I'm sorry, but after 13+ years in health care, I have to ask.....do any of you actually have a clue what you're talking about?:wtf:
Sort of. I know all the stuff that you just gave to us though. I don't know if it would change color when mixed up with oil, but then again I am a foolish young teenager. I did study extensively about blood and genetics in 5th grade (hemotology and genetics no longer interest me though) and know all that you said. How fun this stuff is.

starlight
12-12-2005, 22:56
Since you're writing fiction, you can justify almost anything (and colour) from the additives in the oil.:D

Kohhna
13-12-2005, 00:12
The whole blue blood thing is actually yet another side effect of the crap confusing way that the sciences are taught in schools.


I'm sorry, but after 13+ years in health care, I have to ask.....do any of you actually have a clue what you're talking about?:wtf:
Hell yeah, did you not hear all the noises with the whirring and the bleeding and the Ow! My face!.

I'm more on the supply side of the healthcare market.

CELS
13-12-2005, 00:33
LoL! No offence to anyone here, and I hope you have a bit of self-irony, but.... how can you dispute the fact that blood is red? It just strikes me as rather funny. What about when you take a blood sample, or when you bleed in water, or other situations where you can see blood that isn't exposed to air? For that matter, why do faces turn red when you blush and not blue? :D

Unless of course you were all joking and I'm just making a fool out of myself now. Oh well :D

starlight
13-12-2005, 00:58
And like, in the movies, when someone gets shot or cut you always see red blood everywhere, even underwater, that's *PROOF* that blood is red!

.....erm......I'll be quiet now.:p

Actually *blue bloods* are a reference to the blue tinge that was seen in the skin of people suffering from silver poisoning that rich people used to get from all of their silver utensils and servingware.