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View Full Version : Why do limited edition release of certain models or sets ?



SPYDER68
17-08-2009, 14:47
We all know GW loves to take our money... But why do they do limited release things ? expecially with space hulk ?

There is definatly a market for it.. so why make it a one time print and nothing more ?

Seems like a bad idea to me.

Max Jet
17-08-2009, 15:06
Here is your answer


Just ordered mine this morning... around 90 Euro's at the current Pound/Euro exchange rate.
(Blast that high overseas shipping cost!)

Might seem a bit expensive? Yes, maybee... but I think I can justify it for myself cause it's a limited run. If you want to have something nice once in a while - sadly nowadays - you're gonna have to pay for it.
And then again, it's as expansive as buying a BaneBlade at my local retailer... so it aint half that bad now is it?

SPYDER68
17-08-2009, 15:07
If i played Space marines or Tyranids.. i would but it for the models alone..

So i really doubt it will effect 40k sales..

massey
17-08-2009, 15:11
People buy it in a rush. Then, if it's successful, GW can later decide to do another production run.

Don't think that if this thing sells out in two days, they won't make more. "By popular demand, we have decided to make another 100,000 copies..."

Brimstone
17-08-2009, 15:18
For certain games you could have two reasons.

1. Copyright - In order to maintain the use of certain copyrighted materials they have to be used so copyright can be maintained.
2. Licences - Battle of the five armies (Epic LoTR) - GW had to produce it because that's what they had signed up for even though they didn't want to.
3. Profit - Certain games can be produced in house on GW production lines but others use items (e.g. Card Tiles) that have to be sourced from a third party cutting into GW's profit per box, once committed to a launch they have to go through with it but due to the small amount of profitability they don't have much interest in it.

SPYDER68
17-08-2009, 15:22
For certain games you could have two reasons.

1. Trademarks - In order to maintain the use of certain trademarked materials they have to be used so they can be maintained.
2. Licences - Battle of the five armies (Epic LoTR) - GW had to produce it because that's what they had signed up for even though they didn't want to.
3. Profit - Certain games can be produced in house on GW production lines but others use items (e.g. Card Tiles) that have to be sourced from a third party cutting into GW's profit per box, once committed to a launch they have to go through with it but due to the small amount of profitability they don't have much interest in it.

I never really thought of it that way..

I wish they would at least sell the models in seperate box sets.. even if they cost more then the normal ones..


Other things like the limited run models in the old spearheads etc that are hard to get ahold of would have been nice for normal release models.


But yea. i guess it all comes down to how much they pay for the 3rd party work.

The price on this box seems cheap cheap to me.. you get $210 worth of models that look better then the normal GW ones.. and the game.

Brimstone
17-08-2009, 15:26
Lets keep this generic please I've been shutting down excess 'Space Hulk' threads all day.

The Warseer Inquisition

Fay_Redd
17-08-2009, 15:26
I hope they dont run out before i am able to place my deposit...ill be really annoyed if they do. with myself more than anything.

SPYDER68
17-08-2009, 15:41
Anyone have a list of the limited release models they have put out so far ?

I know of.

Witch hunters Inquisiter
Tau Etheral
Eldar Farseer
Eldar Autarch

i know there is others im not thinking of

t-tauri
17-08-2009, 15:51
There's a comprehensive list here (http://www.solegends.com/citle/index.htm). The reason for doing them was to give an incentive to buy army boxes or visit events.

They've stopped the army box ones as ebay resllers were buying the army box and breaking it up into components and selling it for a significant profit over the army box costs. Some of the limited figures would go for 40 or 50 on ebay when the army box was around 100. Coupled with the resistance to spearheads GW've dropped the boxed army accompanying release to some extent.

SPYDER68
17-08-2009, 15:55
There's a comprehensive list here (http://www.solegends.com/citle/index.htm). The reason for doing them was to give an incentive to buy army boxes or visit events.

They've stopped the army box ones as ebay resllers were buying the army box and breaking it up into components and selling it for a significant profit over the army box costs. Some of the limited figures would go for 40 or 50 on ebay when the army box was around 100. Coupled with the resistance to spearheads GW've dropped the boxed army accompanying release to some extent.

Thanks for that link.

I already see i must get that Kroot shaper.. if i can find one :P

Jagged
17-08-2009, 16:40
I suppose GW may have to think about their production capacity. Sure the latest "special" will bring in the dosh but would sustained production match the revenue from a popular army like Orks or Space Marines?

I suspect "limited editions" make good financial sense and with GWs increasing use of scanning and the like I suspect they can recreate any molds in the future should they so choose.

Xelloss
17-08-2009, 17:12
A good reason can be production machine immobilisation : For a limited release, they can "borrow" the prod lines from other sprues that have enough stock. After making X of the limited release object, they resume the initial product production.

This method is good on 2 sides : 1/ you don't have to buy additional machines, 2/ you enhance the profitability of the existing lines of production (decreased by the need of stocks)

(English isn't my native tongue so excuse me if some words are not the right ones...)

AFnord
17-08-2009, 17:44
One of the main reasons why companies does this is that it promotes impulse buys. Put a limit on something, and suddenly it looks a lot more attractive, and it adds a sense of urgency. A lot of people who would not normally buy the product will. How many do you think pre-ordered the limited edition of dark heresy even tough they never really wanted to play the game? How many of us have pre-ordered Space hulk, even tough we were not sure if we really were that interested in it? It's a common (and working) strategy to increase sales.

Bookwrak
17-08-2009, 17:47
Or in my case, I'm very interested in it, and if I don't like what they've done with the rules in this edition, I'll have the old ones to use instead.

SPYDER68
17-08-2009, 18:14
The limited edition nature of a box that is $100 or so... I don't care to go out and buy, ill live without it.

I would probly buy it later on thou if i do a space marine army to use the termies in it, but thats about it.

The game looks fun.. but not if i haft to rush to buy it.. And no way will i pay double on Ebay for it from somone who thought it would be fun to buy 4-5 to turn a profit later.

To me few things.. should be less then limited. or make so many in the first release that you have a nice sized stockpile to call it limited but still have plenty.

Dangersaurus
17-08-2009, 18:17
For certain games you could have two reasons.

1. Copyright - In order to maintain the use of certain copyrighted materials they have to be used so copyright can be maintained.

Close. You don't have to do anything to maintain copyright. You're thinking of trademark. If you don't maintain your trademarks (in the US at least), they can become inactive and open to use by others.

Yayale
17-08-2009, 18:28
I didn't realise space hulk was available to pre order. How come it's not been in White Dwarf??

Alessander
17-08-2009, 18:56
For non-core games, splash releases make more money than extended. See also Talisman (pre-FFG).

Doppleskanger
17-08-2009, 18:59
I always disliked the limited edition models. They tend to be nice and great incentives etc. But I don't go the events and often I may start an army a long time after the first release and associated ltd mini. Then I'm left having to source it second hand which can be brutal. I don't see any real benefit to GW in this as they don't get the hyped up ebay value. I wish they'd take all the ltd models and recast them all occasionally. Ok it would miff the collectors who are only thinking in terms of re-sale value, but so what. That's not what this hobby is about. So ner.

NealSmith
17-08-2009, 19:04
I haven't been understanding it either lately...

SH is one thing. It's a self-contained game. OK, I can live with that.

Mines, Booby Traps, etc.? Why do that in limited run? Lots of people would want that!

The Imperial Strongpoint boxed set - They obviously misjudge interest here. So much so that they had to just "put together" an equivalent deal. It never really was advertised "as limited", but they clearly were thinking that when they told the GW USA staff that after they started running out. I have the emails to prove it...

The only thing a limited edition does is drive up the price in the secondary market. A market GW is trying to actually stamp out. Weird...

Lord Humongous
17-08-2009, 19:15
Think about it- people have a certain amount of money to spend on minis etc, and they either hold back or spend that money on certain products based on various factors. One factor might be "will I be able to get this product in the future"? By making (or creating the perception of) limited edition sales, they force people to not delay purchase. Its worth noting that frequent price increases also make sense in this light.

Also, to some extent, GW products main competitors are other GW products; if you buy one, its some other you don't buy. In that sense, limited time availability of products makes sense, because it means fewer products on sale at any one time (which means lower expenses) with higher sales for the ones that are available (no real revenue loss).

barret4thewin
17-08-2009, 19:40
Companys always do Limited Editions. I personally feel with Space Hulk it would be a shame if they did sell the box full time, even tho i did manage to get a copy. With the other moels it gives collectors of those ranges (not just people wishing to do armies' somthing to make there army stand out

Fobster
17-08-2009, 20:01
Having worked in retail a bit excess stock is a curse on a balance sheet. It usually means the store is paying interest on the product eating into the end profit. I used to have manage the specials and coach other staff into pushing old lines on customers. Must be the same for GW, having a pile of unsold specialist games on their shelves must tie up a lot of cash. Since They are so loathe to put on a special of any kind, limited runs are ideal. Once they've sold their is no longer a need to support the line.

jamesterjlrb
17-08-2009, 21:26
I literally went into my GW at 10.00 am UK time this morning and got shown the online pics by the ecstatic manager. I went "Yeah that's awesome but i don't have the money i'll buy it in a few months." He goes " no you won't it's limited edition." I've bought it. I see why they do it. Who knows whether i'd ever have bought it otherwise because i would have rationalised and found it wasn't worth it to me.

Inquis. Jaeger
18-08-2009, 12:30
In terms of economic theory, limiting the supply of a given good pushes demand to an artificially high point (even if the limited supply is only a perceived limited supply by the market place) - in effect the price elasticity of demand (the response of quantity demanded to changes in price of a given commodity) becomes more inelastic, thereby ensuring demand for the good is less sensitive to a higher price than if the product was not limited in supply.

Essentially by limiting demand they can charge more for the product and still sell the same amount.

NealSmith
18-08-2009, 13:12
Guys, I understand the rules of supply and demand! I understand the "buzz" that's generated by a short term product line. I understand inventory.

My main gripe is that they don't even produce enough for their initial demand. It doesn't help ANYONE when they do that. They could have sold 6 times the number of bombs, boobytraps, thingies if they'd just gone ahead and produced enough to cover their pre-orders...

Wintermute
18-08-2009, 17:47
I'm moving this thread to the Other GW Discussion Forum.

Wintermute

Cane
18-08-2009, 17:57
If the limited edition Praetorians were still around I'm sure it'd sell decently enough (or at least compete with the other metal regiments) but then again I could be overestimating the Michael Caine fanbase :chrome:

Wintertooth
18-08-2009, 18:03
My main gripe is that they don't even produce enough for their initial demand. It doesn't help ANYONE when they do that. They could have sold 6 times the number of bombs, boobytraps, thingies if they'd just gone ahead and produced enough to cover their pre-orders...

Maybe they could have, but that was a failure of forecasting, and it was the right sort of mistake to make. The real mistake there was overselling. If you have to disappoint a customer, do it before you've taken his order.

They could have overestimated demand and been left with stock they'll never sell - compare the 40k Gamers Edition, a limited release that's still available over a year later. That would be an expensive mistake.

GW aren't so financially secure that they can afford to be writing off a warehouse full of stock every year. Their sales estimates will, more or often than not, err on the side of caution.

If they have any sense, there'll be another mines/bombs style product somewhere in the pipeline for the next couple of years, and their forecast for its sales will be slightly more accurate than the last one.

t-tauri
18-08-2009, 18:31
What the limited editions do is drive demand into a short period. People go out of their way to pick it up in the narrow window of release or availability. One of the reasons they've stopped having sales in the GW stores is that they've got so much better at controlling inventory. I can remember picking up bags full of metal minis at 50p a blister. At the end of the sale you could get a carrier bag full for a few pounds. No more. They don't overproduce models to anything like the same degree.

I think they've produced more of this Space Hulk than they did of the first two editions of Space Hulk, Man o War, Necromunds and all the rest of the big boxed games. All of those were eventually sold off at reduced prices to clear the stock. The marketing of this edition seems extremely well designed to avoid that problem.

Things like the resin mines have their production outsourced so they are produced months in advance and a second run would be expensive and take months to organise by which time the demand has vanished. If the demand was really big like the laser pointers they can do a second run.

zedeyejoe
18-08-2009, 19:50
What Brimstone said with the following addition;

You have to go to an outside source to get your printing done. You have 2 choices;

a) Either print tons so you have enough stock to supply oh lets say 5 years demand

or

b) Keep it short and sweet, so that everything you make sells in 2 months.

So hopefully folks you choose b) make a bit of money for your business and have the answer to the question.

blongbling
20-08-2009, 09:41
GW does it so that you get motivated to buy it straight away, not wait.

They also do it so that they can sell out, meaning that if you missed out this time on something you wanted, next time you will make sure that you get it in time.

Selling out of something is exactly what GW wants to do, they dont want stock sittting around so they would rather sell out and leave demand.

Lewis
20-08-2009, 10:42
With actual games like SH I think its to avoid winging. People are going on and on about the expansions that may be relased for this game but the fact of the matter is that this is going to be it: spalsh release, jobs done. It was always really depressing when GW released boxes like Man O'War, Advanced Space Crusade, Necromunda or whatever that would slowly be less and less supported as time went on, alienating their players. I like that this is all there is for Space Hulk, I know where I stand, and the limited release underlines this.

As to minatures I think its far more of a thing about incentivising purchases (would you really dash to buy mines under normal circumstances?) and also a way to hedge bets with regards to the amount of a model that would have to be supported over a long period (once again I don't know how well mines would sell long term when the planet strike fever has died down.)

Earl_UK
21-08-2009, 10:34
There's a comprehensive list here (http://www.solegends.com/citle/index.htm). The reason for doing them was to give an incentive to buy army boxes or visit events.

They've stopped the army box ones as ebay resllers were buying the army box and breaking it up into components and selling it for a significant profit over the army box costs. Some of the limited figures would go for 40 or 50 on ebay when the army box was around 100. Coupled with the resistance to spearheads GW've dropped the boxed army accompanying release to some extent.

What an awesome website !!!!

Velsharoon
21-08-2009, 11:04
I just hope there is some left in a couple of weeks time :(

ashc
21-08-2009, 14:47
I think its cool that its limited edition really, certainly persuaded me to advance order a copy where otherwise I may not have done so.

It just surprises me that this wasn't released nearer the christmas period or suchlike.

Griefbringer
21-08-2009, 17:06
It just surprises me that this wasn't released nearer the christmas period or suchlike.

Christmas period is probably big enough seller as it is - might be more useful to use special releases to boost up sales in the more quiet months.

jackson11
21-08-2009, 17:47
The local market trader was selling calculators one day. I watched him while sat on a bench waiting for my wife. He only had one calculator on the bench and was shouting about how it was the last one left at this amazing price as he had sold out all the others already.

Two people almost came to blows to buy this last one as they were desperate not to lose out on what everyone else had obviously grabbed already. When this "last" one had been sold and the two customers moved out of ear shot he produced another identical one from under his stand and repeated the procedure. I have never seen people fight for calculators like they did that day.

The man further on with his stall of identical calculators in rows ten deep and five high, at the same price didnt sell one as people walked by with the idea that whatever he was selling wasnt popular or a bargain as other people hadnt bought them all. Even if they liked his stock they didnt bother stopping as they thought they would get round to buying one later with no fear of him running out as he has loads in stock.

You get my point im sure, people love to be sold to and playing with peoples minds gets sales. Simple as that. This is often the reasoning behind some companies doing "limited releases". A small change of packaging or the change of the colour of one piece of contents gets round any legal issues if you want to suddenly re-sell the items at a later date after you have already milked the initial rush of desperate buyers not willing to miss out on the big chance.

blongbling
22-08-2009, 11:05
I think its cool that its limited edition really, certainly persuaded me to advance order a copy where otherwise I may not have done so.

It just surprises me that this wasn't released nearer the christmas period or suchlike.

September is the biggest selling month for the trade businesses across GW, makes sense to launch it in that month

Killgore
25-08-2009, 17:18
September is the biggest selling month for the trade businesses across GW, makes sense to launch it in that month

Coincides with student loan month :P

I like the idea of Limited release models, it encourages people to act and spend money or risk the chance of loosing out, for example when the Inquisitor Lorr (Van Helsing model) was released on GW online i just had to buy it, whilst i was ordering it i also ordered some other models i probaly didnt need.

The special gamesday models are another example of encouraging people to go to an event that they might not have bothered with.

Hashshashin
25-08-2009, 20:19
Coincides with student loan month :P


I actually thought the same thing the other day.

I think "limited" or "special" editions are cool, not only do they increase the demand for GW, but they give us gamers something to "collect" thats unioque or more finite than an ordinary release.

Looking on the List of limited ed models, I see alot of models I could have gotten but didn't and kind of regret it, but I'm not going to lose sleep over it.

but I think the thing to keep in mind is GW doesn't have an obligation to make every model a standard release. They only need to stay in business so we can keep getting any kind of releases :D

olean
25-08-2009, 20:49
My guess is that SH will be licensed over to Fantasy Flight Games after a little while, and will be re-published in a non-limited edition. The game is a perfect gateway to 40k, and it makes sense to have FFG market it to a broader audience.

That way GW can recuperate the costs of the molds, keep the game in sale AND keep good on their promise that their SH box is indeed a limited run.

This is what I would have done, anyway, had I been in charge of this project.

Schmapdi
27-08-2009, 06:03
It wouldn't be so bad doing LE if they were smart about it. But as is - all it does drive up profits for resellers who gouge people on Ebay and penalizes people who live in areas without events or GW stores.

It would be better if the LE were like timed exclusives instead. So you go to Gamesday or whatever and get your special Sgt. Marine. He's an exclusive, for the next 5 years, then they dust off the mould and he becomes a direct only collectors model from the GW site.

Or they could make them have the same basic pose/look - but the LE model comes with a fancier looking powersword or is helmetless, etc. Something that's nice - but not a huge difference.

zedeyejoe
27-08-2009, 09:18
It also seems that indies only get limited allocations - so more direct sales for GW.

I think the idea of LE is that it is limited in numbers. But certainly applies in this circumstance where you rely on a print run from an outside supplier. So not being 'in-house' puts limitations on what can be done.