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Captain Brown
02-09-2009, 23:43
Well, due to the lack of activity on my other logs (which are mostly complete any way) I have received a few PMs from members asking if I was alright. I am perfectly fine; I just have not been doing any 40K or WFB stuff recently.

This is what I will be working on for the foreseeable future, not really GW inspired at all (but a few GW bits might make their way into the model before it is done), it is a model of a World War II Flower Class Corvette.

It should be noted I have not built a model ship since I was 15 and it was a 1/700 scale mounted on a cardboard sea (over 20 years ago)…so this should be a bit of an experience. Also my friend Kelly who used to be one half of Sorcerer Studios summed up historical models with the phrase, “historical models scare me, because there are usually pictures out there that show you the real thing, and nothing I do will ever resemble them". This I think is a little nagging fear of many of us who do science-fiction figures and models.

So I want to build the Canadian Flower Class Corvette HMCS CHILLIWACK in her 1942 configuration (short foc’sle). Why, because I am in the navy...and it will be my navy's 100th anniversary next year and there is a competition to build these 1/72 scale models as one of the ways to celebrate that fact.

For those who have forgotten their history, the Flower Class Corvette were simple escorts built to hunt German U-Boats and sweep for mines laid by submarines near harbour entrances. They were based on pre-war Whale Hunting ships and were simple to build and maintain. As a result of the U-Boats being more efficient at sinking merchant ships than initially believed and the loses encountered by convoys, the little Corvettes were impressed into convoy escort across the Atlantic...something they really had not been designed for.

Canada, not having much of an established ship building infrastructure discovered that it could produce these from multiple civilian yards across the country, in fact we built about 111 of the Flower or her successor the Revised Flower Class. As for the name, so the story goes Sir Winston Churchill liked the idea of newspaper stories announcing the sinking of a German U-Boat by HMS Buttercup as somewhat inspiring. Canada named all but 10 of her Flowers after cities and towns, because flowers couldn't knit mittens for the sailors. In fact in Canada almost all our warships are named after cities and towns to encourage connections between the navy and the nation.

HMCS CHILLIWACK was one of the 1939-1940 Canadian Program built on the West Coast at Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd (very close to my home).
Launched: 9-14-1940
Commissioned: 4-8-1941
Foc’sle Extension: 10-10-1943 Halifax (not an issue for this build)
Now I have acquired a copy of the original plans for CHILLIWACK and her sisters AGASSIZ, TRAIL and WETASKIWIN. These plans are with the two mast configuration, which by 1942 CHILLIWACK had dropped to the single mast forward of the bridge (as well as other changes such as Bridge wing extensions, weapon changes and if I do later 1942 the 271 Radar lantern).

The Corvette has arrived:
http://i.imgur.com/wpfMMIf.jpg
It was a little flat from Canada Post.

However the kit seems to be intact:
http://i.imgur.com/3b7Xhbh.jpg

Check of the parts and they all seem to be there, a few bits had broken free, but nothing seriously damaged, just the box getting a little flat.
http://i.imgur.com/m2pVrPB.jpg

I will need to wash them and take a look at the parts next.

One version of CHILLIWACK in early middle 1942
http://i.imgur.com/2GT5wl7.jpg

Someone PM'd me and asked why am I doing this...besides sheer enjoyment I am entering this model in this competition (http://www.navy.forces.gc.ca/centennial/3/3-c_eng.asp?category=121&title=285).

The long painting war continues,

CB

PS: In case you were wondering the number of parts:
http://i.imgur.com/5OhWiA7.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/XDSa5Gl.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/YjDqJyK.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/VQppODs.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/oNylEnD.jpg

McMullet
02-09-2009, 23:57
Well well, I just escaped from a naval history wikipedia chain (though it touched only briefly on WWII, the flower class did come up), only to be cornered in the place I least expected it!

That looks like a fantastic kit, and it'll make a more socially acceptable ornament than 40k figs (Since people will look at it and say, "Wow, nice ship!" rather than "wtf is that and why does it have tentacles"). Rather makes me want to build and paint something real as well...

Captain Brown
04-09-2009, 18:58
Thanks for the props McMullet, I like the socially acceptable comment...never really thought of it that way. We also have this nice new painting log forum just begging for more historical content. ;)

A little more background, the Battle of the Atlantic which lasted 2,075 days was the longest campaign of the Second World War. It pitted Allied navies against German and Italian naval forces, especially submarines, in a battle to safeguard the essential flow of shipping between North America and Europe.

Like the German U-Boats, the Corvettes were there throughout from almost the first month’s right until the end. Like the U-Boats, the Corvettes were required to be refitted/re-designed and upgraded as the war and technology progressed.

No other warship is so intimately tired to the history of the Canadian Navy, with over 120 Corvettes built in Canada and serving during the Second World War. It remains to this day the largest single class ever produced for the RCN/CF.

A great quote on corvettes:
“Soon-but oh, make haste! The vast resources of the United States will be hurled into the North Atlantic to turn the tide…But until that happy day-and long after…remember the Canadian corvettes-those far flung, storm tossed little ships on which the German Fuhrer has never looked and yet which have, since 1940, stood between him and the conquest of the world.” Lt(N) Philip Cabel Evans, HMCS Trillium March 1943

So I went through the kit and looked at the various parts on their sprue, comparing these to the drawings in John McKay & John Harland’s Anatomy of the Ship – The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ as well as John Lambert and Les Brown’s Flower Class Corevetes. I also visited Bob Pearson's excellent site (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/) and reviewed some of his conversion articles.
After that I made a list of the changes/modifications I will have to do (there will likely be more as I carry out the build). But I wanted to use as many parts of the original kit, just improving them to look more authentic.

Hull
Removal of a portion of the upper deck to forward of the bridge
Extra-large keel ground off
Stem needs to be removed and rebuilt
Bilge rails are way too large and thick, replacing with plasticard
Extra Portholes Covered
Square Scuppers Covered
Port Hole Eyebrows…torn as the West Coast ships seemed to have these
Stern needs to be flattened out and pulled to make sure there is room for Minesweeping gear and the Canadian stern

Deck and Fittings
All decks needs to have the fake reversed wood panelling taken off
Well deck needs to be scratch-built
Some water tight doors and other materials for the foc’sle
Additional decking added at the stern of the engine casing
Windlass, this is going to have to be built from scratch or a substitute found
Anchors need work and the hawse pipe is a joke
Hull Splinter Shields; on the forward ones I think I will have to move the placement as some of the West Coast Corvettes had them added slightly inboard
Lockers all need hinges and detailing
Wooden decks added forward and aft and in the well deck area
Mast…kit version is too short for short foc’sle and the SW1C/SW2C is missing
Life Boat Davits need lots of work
Boat Deck needs to be scratch-built and wood planking added, it will need lots of work as the kit is dearth in details here
Oval Life Rafts, need some work, not that bad
Life Boats, fortunately 1942 the smaller square stern life boats were in use and not the Whaler…but major internal work will be required. Things like oars, rudder, ribs, thwarts, etc.
Hatches need detailing
Rectangle Life Rafts still debating if I want to make a pair
Rope & Cable Reels need detailing or replacement
Small Ventilators need detailing
Need to scratch-build blake and bottle screw slip

Bridge
A new bridge will need to be built for the Short Focsle version
Search Lights need some pretty major work
Bridge Deck needs wood planking
Bridge Ladder Moved
Radar Lantern House…depending on early or late 1942 will determine if I need this, it needs a door, holes in the grate, etc.
Bridge Supports, again a pre or post 271 Radar set addition (CHILLIWACK had parts of the set added on repeated visits to Londonderry with the set being completed in December 1942)
Windshield…I will think of something
Bridge Splinter Shields/Splinter Mats…kit ones are a little sparse and the whole Bridge needs to be rebuilt for a type B design
Pipe Rails added instead of the fake flat plastic in the kit which look fragile and not really accurate
Rail Dodgers see above, going to built the pipe rails and then add some tissue paper
Wind dodger needs to be scratch built
Flag Box needs a complete replacement
Assorted Lockers need hinges and butterfly clips
Signal Light Platforms replacement or major conversion work
Deck House Ladders need replacement
D/F Coil, replacement with a round version
Bridge Voice Pipes need some detailing

Engine Room Casing
Needs to be shortened and corrected for Canadian version with overhang and struts
Move the 2 Pdr Bandstand aft
Engine Room Skylight…needs to be completely rebuilt as the kit version is wrong on so many levels.
Watertight Doors…the kit versions are really poor
Galley to be removed and moved aft of bridge
Funnel is a decent representation, but the rivets are such a noticeable feature, I may replace it.
Funnel Ladder, kit version is pretty simple
Steam Pipes on Funnel
Large ventilators really need some work as the kit versions are simple and too thick
Placement of gear and other changes are necessary

Weapons
4-inch Main Gun & Shield replacement or a complete scratch-build
Bandstand for the above will need treads and a replacement for the ammunition holders as well as some mesh and other detailing
2 Pdr (working on deciding if I am going to do early 1942 or late 1942…as early actually seemed to have a 20 mm Oerlikon in the rear bandstand while late had the 2 Pdr – if someone knows when I would love to know). Either way a replacement of complete scratch-build looks necessary
The 2 Pdr Bandstand tub needs to be replaced and a tread added
Bridge Weapons – either 303 Lewis Guns or 50 Cal twined Machine Guns look like the fittings for 1942. As per the 2 Pdr a completely new build will be necessary as the kit parts are really quite poor (again, no confirmation seems available)
Depth Charge Throwers…these are not bad…OK they are bad, about the level of the other weapons, I think some framing for the base and a little detail work will make them acceptable. Depth Charges are a little weak, but with some cutting off of extra parts and some paint detail they can work. The stalks are really too small and will have to be replaced, as well as stalk carrier detail.
Depth Charge Racks, too thick and too large, so some platicard replacements look necessary
Smoke Candle Racks…I think there is some sort of thick box that the kit provides
Floater Nets & Racks
Smoke Candles need some holes drilled

Minesweeping Gear
As this was not removed until the foc’sle extension I need to scratch-build the lot, as the kit has nothing and the corvettes built for Britain (which the kit HMCS SNOWBERRY was) did not have it fitted
Winch
Davits (x2)
Large Minesweeping Floats (x2)
Otter/Kite Floats (x4)
Gallows (x2)
Dan Buoys and racks

I also figured I should show my workspace and tools...OK, it is the kitchen table which means I will have to clean up after every session otherwise Mrs Captain Brown will have words with me.
http://i.imgur.com/Nbn2vV5.jpg
Therefore my construction is going to be start and stop...so I will likely break many of these jobs down into mini-projects.

That is going to be a lot of work, notice I have not even mentioned painting/weathering, etc.

Since everyone loves pictures, here is CHILLIWACK in either late 1942 and early 1943.
http://i.imgur.com/7dGttQ2.jpg Photo courtesy of the CF - Project Pride
Notice the bridge struts, 271 Radar lantern and I am pretty certain that is a 2 Pdr now in the aft bandstand.

The long painting war continues,

CB

Lostanddamned
05-09-2009, 00:05
I think I am going to be following this log with intense interest, I too am looking to build a model ship in the near future, hopefully to beyond the peak of my abilities.

Thankfully the ship I am looking to build has a fair few models of it built, as it is the Bismarck, my great-great uncle was the chief engineer during the building of the boat and I'd like to give it a shot myself as it were.

I will be keeping an eye on your log for hints and tips. Best of luck to you sir.

Wintermute
05-09-2009, 10:13
My local indie store keeps this kit as a stock item and I've yet to see one built, so I'm very interested in this project.

BTW despite the fact it says Revell on the box the kit was originally made by Matchbox and dates from the late 70s early 80s.

The boyz
05-09-2009, 11:04
That looks a very impressive kit. Good luck Captain Brown. Going to be keeping my eye on this for sure.

Captain Brown
05-09-2009, 21:41
Thanks guys,

Build Update

So I started one of my small projects, the Mark II Depth Charge Throwers.

http://i.imgur.com/0UZbvsE.jpg
As you can see the kit versions are really rudimentary plastic...things and other than a tube and a suggestion of another smaller tube they really bear little resemblance. The drawing above is from John McKay & John Harland's Anatomy of the Ship - The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ and I cannot recommend this book enough.

So I started by trimming off the excess plastic for the forward support and much of the plastic protrusion that is supposed to be the firing chamber. Top is the basic assembly and below it is my trimmed version.
http://i.imgur.com/6dyNJOg.jpg

Now for a firing chamber I wanted something cylindrical and of the correct length, wanting to use as much of the Kit parts as possible I grabbed the two Lewis Gun supports and cut them to down to get two cylinders…these when divided were just about the perfect length.
http://i.imgur.com/M2uZTcz.jpg

Building the bases (the Chooper II is excellent for this – that tool was not on my work bench table because it was a present from Mrs Captain Brown for my birthday), styrene and some small L bracket styrene.
http://i.imgur.com/YfKgo3U.jpg

Comparison between the kit version and my ‘upgraded’ one, the firing pins came from some small 1/35 tank tread ends (with a pin), some styrene rod and .020x.010 styrene strips to make the brackets:
http://i.imgur.com/7Omun1q.jpg

More to follow as I have hit the image limit.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
05-09-2009, 21:42
Update continued...

A shot of the Mark II Throwers all fixed up:
http://i.imgur.com/dCPzZmX.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/n51HidZ.jpg
So all that is left is a little cleaning of the pieces (especially the now pointless banding and where the styrene has gotten bent).

So there they are, my first ‘kit-bash’ for the corvette.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
06-09-2009, 16:31
Next parts to get worked on are the forward and after bandstands. The kit comes with flat plastic bases (no tread - which Corvettes had added fairly quickly into commission), and the aft bandstand for the 2 Pdr has a really, really thick shield. I visited Bob Pearson's great site (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/MODELS/04-Basic_Accurizing/04-Basic_Accurizing.htm) and got some ideas on what to do. Treads are all 0.010 x 0.020 styrene strips.

4-Inch Bandstand
Original part with some pencil marks, found a use for that old compass and protractor to get the lines drawn...use pencil, very easy to erase mistakes.
http://i.imgur.com/ViPuiuT.jpg
Tread added (again I used the Chopper II to make the treads fairly quickly)
http://i.imgur.com/pMcXxQy.jpg

Next was the aft Bandstand for the 2-Pdr Pom-Pom
Original Part.
http://i.imgur.com/c5E62Ep.jpg
Using the Dremel Mini to cut off the old splinter shield...one minor error. I recommend that you use a clamp to hold the Bandstand and a glove on the holding hand...just in case.
http://i.imgur.com/poW1CLu.jpg
The star tread.
http://i.imgur.com/l0WfvV1.jpg
Modelling action shot...the plastic cement is still drying...
http://i.imgur.com/hzRG8Kx.jpg

Image limit reached so I will continue shortly.

Cheers,

CB

Captain Brown
06-09-2009, 16:31
Continued...

Splinter Shield getting added.
http://i.imgur.com/StxGq1X.jpg
With the shelter added (I filed down some of the shelter parts to remove the part numbers on the inside and to widen the doorway.
http://i.imgur.com/XJC993m.jpg

The long painting war continues...

CB

Crube
07-09-2009, 10:13
Those MkII throwers are a great improvement.

It looks a great kit, but it does show there's always room for a dedicated(insane) modeller to add details.

Just how long do you have to get this finished...?

Anyways, following this with interest, as this is the sort of modelling my dad used to do.

Captain Brown
08-09-2009, 15:43
Crube,

I need to be painted and buttoned up by January 2010.

So with that dead-line looming...

The ventilators are rather chunky, especially at the mouth; the thick plastic is particularly noticeable. So after gluing and regular trimming I sat down with my Mini-Dremel and began to sand down the mouths.

Before:
http://i.imgur.com/3iI6WWZ.jpg

After:
http://i.imgur.com/7415VWa.jpg

The long painting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
09-09-2009, 05:49
Start on the two lifeboats:

Used Bob Pearson's site (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/MODELS/02-Whaler/02-Whaler.htm) for some inspiration (his 27' Whaler conversion).

The boats themselves are a two part set that sort of resembles a lifeboat…sort of. Lower halves of the lifeboats.
http://i.imgur.com/y9XIDEv.jpg

Ribs added with 0.010 x 0.020 styrene strips
http://i.imgur.com/PuFdpZe.jpg

Floor boards (which look a little low, might add something to raise them up now) added.
http://i.imgur.com/h792zuh.jpg

Still need to do thwarts, knees, build a rudder, oars and survival keg/ration tins.

Cheers,

CB

Captain Brown
09-09-2009, 05:52
However lifeboats soon faded from mind (this seems to be a pattern for all modeling and painting projects...I just have made lots on little ones in one larger one to keep on track.

I have been working on the Engine Casing Skylight. Again I followed the basic guidelines set out in Bob Pearson’s site (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/MODELS/04-Basic_Accurizing/04-Basic_Accurizing.htm), with some minor adjustments. The kit part has two few skylights and is too short and too high.

"Using [a] sheet styrene I cut two sides (2mm x 60mm) and two ends (32mm x 7mm). The end pieces then had the angle cut in place by centering a line at the middle of the top and connecting it to the side at 2mm height. The four pieces were then glued together and the sloping tops (17mm x 60mm) were added." Source Basic_Accurizing (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/MODELS/04-Basic_Accurizing/04-Basic_Accurizing.htm) by Bob Pearson.

After following this I trimmed the corners 45 degrees to get a good join and added some gash styrene to be braces on the inside and had a completed base to work from.

The scuttle shutters were made of at base of 0.020 styrene rectangles of 7.5 mm by 9 mm and over these were added 0.010 styrene rectangles of 9 mm by 10.5 mm. Both sets had their corners cut to create the impression of a rounded corner and were glued together to make the scuttle shutters.

Skylight base on the left, scuttles above and the shutters below on the right. The scuttle shutters have been flipped over to show you what they look like underneath.
http://i.imgur.com/VwZlS4H.jpg
Then I added a small round disk of styrene created from cutting off a sliver of styrene tubing and standing it down to about 0.75 mm in height. You can see them in the image above before I glued them down. The hinges were made from 0.010 by 0.020 styrene strips.

With scuttles added and the start of the handles above:
http://i.imgur.com/maEZM0x.jpg

Handles were made from staples, just regular staples bent with a pair of pliers and trimmed with a clipper. I traced a line on the scuttle shutters below the scuttle itself and then measured off for the holes. Drilled through with a pin-vice and inserted my handles, a little super glue inside and there we are.

Compared with the kit version on the left:
http://i.imgur.com/p2D88rb.jpg
From the end as it will sit looking aft:
http://i.imgur.com/VWbfHuc.jpg

Now working on the two mushroom vents that sat at each end.

The long painting war continues...

CB

GundamMecha
09-09-2009, 12:36
Awesome project Brown!

Really nice to see some ships for a change! Naval stuff has always appealed to me, my fatehr is big on building wooden model ships. I've never tried wooden ship building before but figure I could manage some injection plastic vesels though!

I'm really looking forward to seeing this progress!

Crube
09-09-2009, 16:42
Interesting - have you checked that your longer version still fits where it should on the kit? You've made a good job of it though :)

Captain Brown
09-09-2009, 18:14
Thanks for the encouragement.

Yes, the engine room skylight covers the existing hole and then some quite nicely.

Another update and another attack of the cat!

The Mini-Dremel is excellent, used it to clear the decks of their fake reversed wood panelling...also for the ventilators, and it will be used to sand off the large keel that the real corvettes never had and likely the bow stem so I can replace it with some styrene.

Here is an example of the speed of the Dremel, I started the pom-pom move. RCN Corvettes had their 2 Pounder 'Pom-Pom' (or whatever other secondary armarment they had in the aft bandstand) moved further aft as the original design had two masts...and it does not really work when your principle anti-aircraft defence weapon is wooded by a mast.

Original engine room casing deck:
http://i.imgur.com/qK4uMsh.jpg

After the dremel made short work of the base:
http://i.imgur.com/CL66xb8.jpg I went to work on the deck to smooth it down.

Suddenly there was a thud as the neighbours cat which had been waiting for the Dremel to stop batted the bandstand pillar off the table (I was working on the deck at the time and he had been draped across the deck ledge watching)...as soon as I placed down the tool and stood up the camera and started to take a shot...instead of showing off the Dremel work I got a cat leg in action.
http://i.imgur.com/bA1dGtF.jpg
Not the first time Charlie has attacked models in progress; previously he has been captured on film knocking at the loader of an Elysian Heavy Bolter Team.

The long painting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
09-09-2009, 18:19
Another Mini-Dremel use was for the deck, the Revell kit has the decks covered in this reverse wood planking, so instead of small gaps between boards there are raised lips of plastic...might work for painting except that Corvettes had steel decks and added wood planking at various high traffic areas and over living spaces.

The deck prior to sanding:
http://i.imgur.com/XoyeYTv.jpg
Then cleaned…since this photo was taken I have sanded off the four lines at the aft end of the quarterdeck (where the depth charge racks would go…except RCN Corvettes had theirs on an angle and much short due to Minesweeping gear) and all the raised portions on the main deck as I am building new superstructure.
http://i.imgur.com/h0tHFMj.jpg

Mini-Dremel made short work of these raised plastic sections.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
09-09-2009, 18:32
So as I mentioned in my first posts, this is a model of a Corvette earlier in her career, with technology advancing various additions to her superstructure, increasing crew sizes and the fact they were designed as coastal vessels and found themselves steaming into the Atlantic to escort conveys a substantial increase in superstructure/hull was necessary. Often referred to as the focsle extension, the Revell kit is post extension (middle to late war addition...in fact about ten Canadian Corvettes went the entire war without that extension).

Here are the four portions that make up the hull.
http://i.imgur.com/kSBCe59.jpg
You can clearly see the rise in the hull in the stern halves below...my build needs to move that rise forward of the bridge...which also means I have to build the superstructure previously hidden by the deck extension.
http://i.imgur.com/kl79609.jpg
That also means that once I cut I am committed to building a short focsle corvette...

So, I have been putting it off, but once Bob’s drawings arrived it was time to take the plunge and cut the hull…the feeling you get just before you cut is a strange one.

A Dremel cut or two later, some sanding, more cutting, more sanding. Then removing some of the overlap plastic…more sanding…sanding the old deck and cutting the middle portion in two and adding a piece to the end and we have this:

http://i.imgur.com/Lwc475R.jpg

Very rough, since nothing is glued together yet, but you get the idea.

Now I do need to square off the stern before I glue...looking at attempting the 'hot water' method for that, and I just want to pull out the stern to make it less rounded rather than pushing it in and making the ship too short.

The long painting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
11-09-2009, 03:22
Update,

I have started on the superstructure; I want to make sure that the bridge is level with the angle of the deck (since the corvette has a curve...it was based on a civilian Whaling Ship after all).

The templates from Bob Pearson are very useful, a little cryptic in one or two instances (like the alcoves on RCN corvettes, and some spots you need to cut and add styrene to cover the sides of the raised galley). But really, really a fantastic time saver and guide to the build.

So I needed to start squaring off the stern (as the RCN Corvettes were built for minesweeping from the start and the squaring of the stern added much needed deckspace).

Original Stern
http://i.imgur.com/wBsyl1w.jpg
Using hot water I stretched out the stern and gave it some flatness (as opposed to the original round RN stern), to increase this I added some 0.080 styrene.
http://i.imgur.com/E0zsRpX.jpg
Now you can see it is very rough, and the actual railings have been pulled up as I stretched the plastic back, I will be using the Dremel to sand that down and then cut the fairlead for the minesweeping gear and moving the depth charge holes as well.

Then I started on the end of the Engine Room Casing, RCN Corvettes moved their galleys just aft of the wheelhouse earlier than their RN counterparts and this did not need as much Casing aft, so to make room for the minesweeping gear they shortened the Casing. Here are my cuts to the deck and building the new end pieces.

http://i.imgur.com/Cw4jIEs.jpg

Here is what it looks like on my hull.
http://i.imgur.com/bXrMLAJ.jpg
You can see the extra decking in white styrene I had to add to cover the hole left in the deck with the shortened Casing.

Cheers,

CB

Captain Brown
11-09-2009, 03:23
So continuing with my plan to try and get the superstructure built to a point I could see it with the short focsle.

Wheelhouse

I still have not added the window frames, hence the rough appearance of the windows (I used 0.020 thickness styrene due to the requirement to cut out the windows)
http://i.imgur.com/MFPFAzV.jpg

Assembling the wheelhouse
http://i.imgur.com/QBx31Cr.jpg
Had a little trouble with the sizes, I probably should have tried to square the edges better as it seemed I had some extra structure by the time I finished.

Cheers,

CB

The boyz
12-09-2009, 09:47
Excellent progress Captain Brown, your skills with plasticard are very impressive.

Joey Dunlop
12-09-2009, 17:03
You've given me a very shakey hand, sir! Nice, nice, nice, nice, NICE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

colhodg
12-09-2009, 20:20
I've been eyeing that kit up for a project one day so will be reading this with interest. The Flower corvettes have such an interesting history, i can't imagine the hardship of having to be in the middle of a stormy north atlantic in one of these little ships but they really were the difference between success and failure in the battle of the atlantic. The played a very significant part in enabling britain to stay in the war.

loving the conversion work so far.

Captain Brown
15-09-2009, 23:22
Thanks for the comments,

So did some more work on the compass house (which sits above the wheelhouse from my last post) and here is my dry fit stage:
http://i.imgur.com/A6u5DH0.jpg
She is now starting to resemble an early Corvette.

Here you can just see the bulkheads under the focsle.
http://i.imgur.com/Kop8SnC.jpg

A look from aft, here you can see all the cutting and smoothing I need to do at the stern (need to get rid of that ugly rise in the plastic from my stretching it out).
http://i.imgur.com/Kimhqp6.jpg

Next I have to work on the atrociously large extraneous keel and massively thick stem…neither of which the Corvettes had… not to mention those excessively long and thick bilge keels…they are also going. So I am charging up the Mini-Dremel.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Killshot
18-09-2009, 22:04
Excellent work! However, you are remiss in your reading material! I do not see The Cruel Sea!

Captain Brown
21-09-2009, 19:16
Excellent work! However, you are remiss in your reading material! I do not see The Cruel Sea!

Ha-ha, yes it was a good read, but not that filled with technical details...and the movie actually used a Corvette with an extended focsle.

So I took the hull and started to sand down the excess keel, as well as the mountings for the extremely large and long bilge rails.
http://i.imgur.com/F3FYlyq.jpg

I used a combination of the Mini-Dremel, craft knife and files. Keel was relatively easy; just use the sanding attachment and high speed to eat away at the excess plastic. A little more care was exercised as I got down to the base and I ran the blade of the craft knife along the keel remnants to make it nice and smooth, as well as round off what was left.
http://i.imgur.com/N2TJFv0.jpg

I used the cone sanding attachment on the bilge rail mountings, as I wanted to be careful and not to scar the hull too badly if at all. I used some styrene L bracket strips to make proper bilge rails of just under a foot in scale width.
http://i.imgur.com/sJTL0RP.jpg

I also had to cut out some more scuppers…and fill in one of the aft most scuppers and one fairlead (as the kit being the British design had one more added with the extending of the focsle and the Canadian design had only one fairlead hole aft vice two modelled in the kit).
Here are the three new scuppers:
http://i.imgur.com/ytfgWvq.jpg

At the same time I flattened that rise in the stern bulwarks created when I stretched out and flattened the stern. The flaps for the depth charge holes almost fit perfectly into the gaps so I will be gluing them in and sanding them down…as they are presently on an angle due to the plastic bending for the additional styrene. Once this is all ship shape I will add some styrene strips to recreate the lip of the top of the transom and later cut out three holes for the depth charge rails and the fairlead for the minesweeping gear.

Cheers,

CB

Captain Brown
21-09-2009, 19:30
For the bow and the ridiculously wide stem I actually used the sanding attachment on an angle and tried to marry it to the hull form, basically extending forward a few millimetres…I did this because the actual stem of the Corvette was a single piece of steel and not a great flat thick slap as featured in the kit by the fusing to the two sides of the hull.
This is a photo from someone else building a corvette, to give you an idea of the size of the stem and keel...
http://i632.photobucket.com/albums/uu47/Patonga/josbow.jpg~original

Now what I did with the Dremel.
http://i.imgur.com/pMTq65v.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/JnDSK5M.jpg

Now for the stem itself I cut a piece of styrene (0.020 square strip) to make the actual stem for the Corvette’s most deadly weapon…the ram. Sad as it seems today, despite depth charges, a 4 inch World Ward One deck gun, a 2 pounder anti-aircraft weapon and a pair of Lewis or 50 Calibre Water-cooled Machine Guns…the most effective way for a Corvette to dispatch a U-Boat was to ram her and cut through the submarine’s pressure hull with her bow. Corvette’s were especially adapt at this, as they did not ride so high as Destroyers (because of their low speed) and thus could usually ram a sub several times without doing extensive or critical damage to themselves.
Deadly weapon:
http://i.imgur.com/lSHFOFW.jpg

Cheers,

CB

sheep
23-09-2009, 05:31
Interesting read mate, the deatil and mods are impressive and well done. And the little snippets of history about a subject you are obviously enarmoured with is great to see.

Keep it up :)

Cheers

Sheep

Commissar Molotov
23-09-2009, 07:52
Very, very nice. Looking forward to seeing this to completion!

Captain Brown
23-09-2009, 21:29
Thanks guys,

Some more updates: The non-watertight doors.

The non-watertight doors are made from 0.020 thickness Styrene with 0.020 square strip styrene for the central support and 0.020 by 0.010 strips for the frame and cross-pieces. A little square of 0.020 thickness for the door handle lock and the end of one of the rather useless plastic stanchions makes a nice handle.

So the Chopper II was really useful again and I started by making my doors, after getting the measurements I found the doors to be extremely narrow…so narrow that I cheated and increased the thickness by 1 mm to make them look more realistic at this scale (a little artistic licence). Then I sat down and made them in assembly line fashion. After an hour 8 non-watertight doors were sitting complete before me and I was feeling quite proud of myself…I had finished enough for the model and a few extras in case of problems and cleaned up…

Styrene frames:
http://i.imgur.com/AzwpbZ3.jpg

Handle construction:
http://i.imgur.com/2nsTJJ4.jpg

Finished:
http://i.imgur.com/ZXyeoK4.jpg

Later when I was looking at the model I noticed there are a few more doors than I thought in the bulkheads under the focsle. I need eight just for that, so it looks like I will have to pull out the Chopper II and make some more.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
24-09-2009, 16:29
Finished another five non-watertight doors, that should be enough for my build, ironically I finally tracked down where the other two doors are located, there were two leading to the RCN galley and another two inside the alcove recesses. Which leaves me with one extra in case of problems or someone finds anther spot for them.

Next up is the watertight doors. I have made mine from a base of 0.010 thickness styrene cut 11 mm by 24 mm on top of this is a piece of 0.020 thickness styrene 9 mm by 22 mm so that there is a nice 1 mm gap all the way around.

Rather unimpressive styrene pieces:
http://i.imgur.com/mbsQ4td.jpg

Edges are trimmed at a 45 degree angle and then filed to make a rounded corner. Hinges were made with left over stanchion pieces and they were placed 4.5 mm from the top and bottom. Hinges were made with some 0.010 by 0.020 strips of styrene. Handles were made the same way I made them for the Engine Room Skylight, bending staples for the wire portion. I used the same staples for the dogs for the watertight handles, because they have the curve already there. Trimming them down to size and attaching them with 5 minute epoxy (I tried superglue first, but my applicator really sucked as it was one of those push end variety tubes).

Finished Product:
http://i.imgur.com/wY2Dm8d.jpg

I need three for the end of the Engine Room Casing and two for the Focsle.

Here they are getting added to the Engine Room Casing.
Starboard side:
http://i.imgur.com/LqmDHyr.jpg
Port Side:
http://i.imgur.com/SEWKqsI.jpg

The long painting war continues,

CB

colhodg
24-09-2009, 21:49
The detail on this is fabulous, it's already looking real.

Crube
25-09-2009, 10:05
Some of the conversion work you're doing here is amazing, Captain B... I'd alwas thought of using a Dremel on some major plastic works (I'm thinking my commissioned Ork Wagon) but was scared as I thought it would be too vicious, and melt the plastic. Does the mini dremel you use have variable speed, or is it slower than a regular one, or am I just a klutz?

Also, rereading your 1st post, I realised that there is another reason why I love this log. My Grandad was in the British Navy, and worked on the Atlantic convoys from 1941 - 1943... We just got back from our hols, which included a sobering trip to Scapa Flow...


Keep up the good work :)

Captain Brown
25-09-2009, 16:51
The detail on this is fabulous, it's already looking real.

Thank you, this is why painting logs are great.


Some of the conversion work you're doing here is amazing, Captain B... I'd alwas thought of using a Dremel on some major plastic works (I'm thinking my commissioned Ork Wagon) but was scared as I thought it would be too vicious, and melt the plastic. Does the mini dremel you use have variable speed, or is it slower than a regular one, or am I just a klutz?


The Mini-Dremel has two speeds, slow and fast, I use both. It can melt the plastic, so I tend to grind off some in an area and move to another to let the first cool. I always wear protective glasses, ear plugs and gloves...in case any splinters come off as I am cutting/sanding. Because the Mini-Dremel is cordless and fairly small and light it is pretty easy to control. I also switch to files and sanding blocks for my final sanding.

Speaking of the conversion work of watertight and non-watertight doors, here is the bulkhead under the focsle facing the well deck. Eight non-watertight and two watertight doors (there actually is a ninth non-watertight door that accesses the companionway, but since it faces inwards and won’t be visible once the deck is fitted I am leaving it off.

http://i.imgur.com/2Zp3E2H.jpg
The large number of non-watertight doors on the port side led to the heads (toilets)...which had a direct standpipe to the sea and meant that using them in any sort of sea was very, very, very tricky. A good wave on the bow and you got salt water shooting up...well I will leave it at that.

Next up, was the bulwark railing, the kit has a very nice top to the bulwarks back aft, but since I cut my hull to create the short focsle I am left with a rather narrow and rough bulwark. So I sanded down the inside to remove the now visible part numbers, then I attached a strip of 0.010 by 0.125 styrene to each side, then a bracket of styrene was added underneath. This effectively made me a common rail.

http://i.imgur.com/NpNFLG0.jpg

Another issue I had was my cut was a little two deep at the rising of the bulwarks to meet the focsle. I followed the template from the drawings Bob Pearson sent me, but I noticed after I had cut that CHILLIWACK and her sisters from the West Coast had a more gradual rise…*nuts*…so some two part epoxy putty was necessary to rebuild the missing section.

http://i.imgur.com/hxwatG9.jpg
In this picture you can see the doorways under the focsle deck with the template from Bob Pearson still attached before I added the non-watertight and watertight doors.

The whole hull with primer coat:
http://i.imgur.com/BapEUvb.jpg

The long painting war continues…

CB

nanktank
27-09-2009, 14:45
this is turning into a very nice rendition of this cool corvette, I myself am building revells 1/72 uboat atm but I have floundered in my references so construction has ground to a halt. Still its insightful to see such modelling skill on a project like this. keep up the good work!

Captain Brown
27-09-2009, 16:03
Thanks nanktank,

You could always dust off the U-Boat and start a log here, our historical section is a little small.

Some more progress.

I started working on the engine room casing aft, as you see above the watertight doors are now on and I fixed up my skylight with two mushroom vents and an edging of 0.015 by 0.060 strips of styrene down the sides.

http://i.imgur.com/J4vA90v.jpg

Then I started on the two ammunition lockers located at the after end of the engine casing deck on RCN corvettes. I added some plastic parts from other kits to try and recreate the butterfly clips, not sure I like them, but it is better than what I started with.

http://i.imgur.com/JYTX8x0.jpg
Anyone with ideas on how to make better 1/72 scale butterfly clips please let me know.

So with the four shorter ventilators and a cleaning gear locker I placed them on the casing to see how it fits together.

http://i.imgur.com/Cbve2XM.jpg

Then I started on the boat deck with this mock-up. You can see the sanding marks where I removed some of the raised detail on the funnel deck base (I also had to build the front bulkhead as the kit was a later RN corvette with the galley moved forward and raised directly in front of the funnel deck).
http://i.imgur.com/tpZHShD.jpg
The non-watertight doors hanging in the air are to the galley which in RCN corvettes was directly behind the bridge, superior to RN corvettes in that you did not have to walk the length of the deck to get your food, you still had to walk down the steps and across the well deck to your mess…which meant your food was just cold and slightly wet when it got to the mess instead of cold and very wet in the RN corvettes, where the galley was right aft.

I also made sliding doors for the wheelhouse; this was with some angle bracket styrene.
http://i.imgur.com/EDdyD3e.jpg
Still need to clean up the window frames for the addition of 'glass'.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
28-09-2009, 01:25
And a little more progress, still doing small bits at one time, mainly because I have to clear my construction area after every session.

Here are the 4 large ventilators getting new reinforcing bands (removed the raised plastic kit portion, which was out of scale with a dremel). Top bands are 0.015 by 0.125 with a 0.010 by 0.080 on top. The base band was a 0.015 by 0.060 strip.
http://i.imgur.com/rPUv8RK.jpg
Next I will use the brown plastic rods that the kit supplied for railings to make the controlling gear (for turning the ventilators into and out of the wind...or sea in the case of Corvettes crossing the Atlantic)...not sure if I want to go all the way and make a notched top band.

I also glued in the scuttles with epoxy (I did this to prevent plastic cement distorting the clear plastic) and placed electricians tape behind them to help keep them fixed. Then I added the forward deck of the focsle and added some 0.010 thickness styrene rolled and pushed through the deck to make hawsepipes. Right now they looked like my Corvette has tissue up it's 'nose'.

http://i.imgur.com/GWL6Zh7.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

the_raptor
28-09-2009, 14:44
Excellent log, I have been an avid reader for some time now. I am not massively into historical modelling but just the sheer amount of work that goes into accurizing kits is very interesting.

Captain Brown
28-09-2009, 18:25
Thanks the_raptor, I have discovered that historical modelling requires a little more attention to detail and old photographs. ;)

More progress...

So next up was the funnel, the kit version is a really plain tube with a rounded band about four fifths up the stack…the instructions suggest you drill four holes through it and tie the supporting stays through the holes and there are a few plastic pieces to add to represent steam pipes, whistle, etc. But that is it, while the pictures of the funnels show some fairly prominent riveting, so I had to do better.

Original Funnel:
http://i.imgur.com/gWRnbUY.jpg

Following some more Bob Pearson advice (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/MODELS/07-Funnel/funnel.htm), I sanded off the rounded band, then using a sheet of thin (0.010 thickness) styrene I used my $1 thread punch to make rivet marks…it actually took two tries as you cannot let your punch wander…so a metal ruler is a must. My riveted band was even more problematic as it was so thin and narrow, it took five tries and a whole lot of wasted styrene.

After gluing the patterned covering over the funnel I added a (0.010 x 0.080 thickness) strip of styrene with a rivet pattern to make the band. This was glued at the same level as the original (now removed) band and then I drilled eight small holes in vertical pairs at virtual right angles to each other in the band. Brass rod of a very thin diameter was cut and bent into shape and glued with superglue into the hole for the rings to attach the supporting stays.

http://i.imgur.com/78TMG75.jpg

Raising the funnel cap. I glued one of my failed rivet marked bands inside the funnel to raise the cap slightly off the stack. I also drilled a hole in the centre of the supporting braces on the top…same as I have seen in photographs.

Inside band for the funnel cap:
http://i.imgur.com/zxTzetS.jpg

Finished Funnel:
http://i.imgur.com/EzVEYBX.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Crube
28-09-2009, 20:18
awesome attention to detail...

Captain Brown
30-09-2009, 06:09
Thank you sir,

The 4-Inch gun mounted on the forward bandstand. The BL (breach loading) 4 inch Mk IX naval gun mounted on the Flower Class Corvettes was a World War I weapon left over in storage, and thus available in the first days of rapid rearmament.

The RCN corvettes had square or round gun shields (predominantly fitted with round gun shields according to photographic evidence)…it seems that those outfitted by the RN had mostly square gun shields…as did the ten corvettes built for the British by the Canadians. Fortunately the kit comes with both versions…unfortunately the gun is built to the same standard as the rest of the kit fittings, a sort of approximation. CHILLIWACK had a round shield through her entire career.

Original Parts:
http://i.imgur.com/xIvF5F8.jpg

So I started off by taking the shield and sanding down the ends of the two pieces that would be exposed to a viewer (lots of folks have suggested cutting entirely new gun shields but I have decided to try and salvage as much as I can), these are the port and starboard sides of the shield.
http://i.imgur.com/pfxGAlu.jpg

Then I cut holes for the targeting sites in the front of the shield.
http://i.imgur.com/PpVTZnk.jpg

Shield assembled:
http://i.imgur.com/wZXHkOM.jpg

Then I took the barrel and breech assembly and cut off the extremely large cap/muzzle, the toy like angle adjustment.
http://i.imgur.com/SO1hrr1.jpg

Since the kit mount bears no resemblance to the original I am taking one of the Oerlikon mounts (as the bridge mounted weapons of this period were either paired Lewis Guns or .50 cal machine guns). I cut a hole in the back and built some elevating gear to fit in the gap. I also glued a short strip of 0.020 thickness styrene a couple of mm high to widen the base.
http://i.imgur.com/sORuqXd.jpg

Side note: I notice most folks who come aboard for tours of warships want to look at ship’s weapons and usually the deck gun is number one on the request list.

The long painting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
30-09-2009, 06:10
4 Inch gun continued...

Added some details to the gun itself, using the drawings from my books and some photos to make the details on the barrel.
http://i.imgur.com/m6MQQpR.jpg

Some angle brackets on the inside of the shield and some large nuts made by cutting up some styrene tubing and I have a basic weapon and shield.
http://i.imgur.com/eyBlQVG.jpg
Still need work on the inside.
Side view:
http://i.imgur.com/RKoX6Oa.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Godfiend
01-10-2009, 23:13
This is an amazing log. I love looking at all these little details and watching them all come together for a amazing final product. Can't wait for more updates :).

Mytola
03-10-2009, 14:30
Very nice to see some naval stuff on here! Plenty of attention to detail, and an interesting subject. Keep up the great work! :)

Captain Brown
05-10-2009, 19:38
Thanks guys,

Another update...

4 Inch continued:

So I have added some rivets to the gun shield and I am not really happy with them, a little too large and distinct.
http://i.imgur.com/FsjP09R.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/0X4AOth.jpg
What do you think? (Since were taken I have tried sanding down the rivets some more)

I think the that I will just sand them off and forget trying to do the rivets, as looking at photographs they are not that distinct.

Aft Bandstand update:

I also noticed in several pictures and the scale drawings I am borrowing that the aft bandstand has a square shield added for access on the middle of the port side vice the cut in the shield and ladder on the starboard side forward that SNOWBERRY and the RN built flowers possessed.

So some 0.020 styrene sheet was cut out and three sides of the square were glued together, then I used 0.020 square styrene to make the lip; over lapping the ends to help the join and then reversing the overlap for the second set to create a lock. I also left some overlap on the open end which I would marry up to the round shield once I had cut the access point.
http://i.imgur.com/nmNISTl.jpg

Then a cut in the side and I married up the ends of my square shield to the lip I had built to the round one.
http://i.imgur.com/A8pp5Fd.jpg

That should be it, until I add the anti-aircraft weapon…I am still leaning towards doing the late 42 and early 43 version of CHILLIWACK who at that point had a 2-punder Pom-pom added, the mid 42 version had a 20 mm in the Aft bandstand.
http://i.imgur.com/uOrNdXO.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues…

CB

Red Skullz
05-10-2009, 21:08
This is a really cool build and very enjoyable to watch!

Could you throw in a "Barry" with the entire model just to get a proper idea of the scale on your next update?

R

McMullet
06-10-2009, 01:07
Amazing work, Cap'n B. I look forward to the engine room (I assume your attention to detail means it will be fully operational? :p).

Captain Brown
06-10-2009, 19:49
This is a really cool build and very enjoyable to watch!

Could you throw in a "Barry" with the entire model just to get a proper idea of the scale on your next update?

R

That will be tough as I have to set up each time to do any modeling and then clean-up when I finish. I will try for a 'done so far mock-up' on the weekend.


Amazing work, Cap'n B. I look forward to the engine room (I assume your attention to detail means it will be fully operational?

Sorry, for a wardroom display case so no water will touch the model and no engine will be added.

So next up on my project list was the minesweeping winch, I figured since it was a really ambitious component I would try to get it done sooner rather than later. With the constant clean-up required after each build period I am slowly seeing some progress, but I really want to get to the painting stage sooner rather than later.

I again used Bob Pearson’s great site for a guide (http://www.cbrnp.com/RNP/Flower/MODELS/06-MS_Winch/MS_Winch.htm).

After reading through his guide I deviated almost immediately, I started with 0.040 thickness styrene to build the steel plate base and a second sheet for the wooden mat it sits on. This gave me a nice lip all the way around as the real set would have looked.

Then out of 0.040 styrene I cut out four struts using the drawings from AOTS converted to 7/72 scale (this proved to be really, really time consuming and next time I try this I will just cut the struts separately and glue them together rather than trying to make each one a single piece, especially with the cuts in the middle.

Then I added three strips of the kit provided piping for railings to act as the guide wires, Bob used brass wire, I used the kit plastic to try and maximise the amount of kit materials used in the model, since the guide wires were thicker than the minesweeping wire I am content with my plastic ones, they also glue down with plastic cement rather than epoxy.

http://i.imgur.com/Dj2Sep9.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/Pvy4ucp.jpg

Next was the spools, here I used 0.040 thickness for the gears and 0.020 thickness for the spool sides and plastic tubing for the centers. The axle was made from some round sprue sanded down. I added 0.010 by 0.020 strips for struts on the large gears and 0.010 by 0.060 strips to make a nice smooth outer edge.

http://i.imgur.com/HR3980V.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/wpUIrgk.jpg

Next was adding the small gears that run of the winch engine and the embossing of geared teeth on the wheels themselves. This proved to be very, very messy…I think it is the krazy glue coupled with the size of the parts…more ended on my hands than on the wheels.

Two Ĺ inch wooden furniture plugs provided the warping drums; the two I have attached are only temporary as I add some 0.020 by 0.020 strips to make a rim and braces for the ends. I used my Mini-Dremel to sand out the sides to make the proper curve.

http://i.imgur.com/27k5Wgv.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/oGwtNf0.jpg

Next up I have to build the pistons and engine to power the gears, this sits on the empty portion of the base. Then some guides for the guide wires and some breaks…I have been trying to think of how I could get/make some of the round handles when I though that I might be able to find some small rings at a bead shop, then I can add some styrene spokes with epoxy…look for an update next week for how that works.

The long painting and converting war continues…

CB

Tommygun
07-10-2009, 12:26
Very nice work. This kit reminds me of the big Blue Devil Destroyer kit I made years ago.
Great detail. Did you mention how long it will be when it is done?

GundamMecha
07-10-2009, 14:15
Just keeps getting better and better!

It's really fascinating to watch this progress and come together.

Captain Brown
11-10-2009, 22:49
Thanks guys, I have been writing a staff paper so I have not done that much more. So I only got a little bit done on the 4-Inch, mainly the elevation wheel and some more detail on the base.

http://i.imgur.com/66FqNOq.jpg

The elevation wheel was a stop gap one made with plastic; I picked up some small rings from the bead store and will be making them into handles over the next few days. I will also be sanding down the gun shield.

As requested a mock-up so far:

http://i.imgur.com/4lziJoX.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
14-10-2009, 02:48
Some more progress…

Remember I was lamenting my lack of hand cranks for elevation on the 4-Inch and the Minesweeping winch? Well I went to a bead store and purchased several small metal rings. Then I cut some styrene piping (smallest diameter I could find in a mixed assortment from Evergreen) to fit inside the ring and filed a notch in the middle. Then I repeated the process and glued the notched sides together making a cross. Then some 5-minute epoxy to get the plastic to adhere to the metal.

They are so small my camera has trouble focusing.
http://i.imgur.com/2s9dRw6.jpg

Then I built my breaks for the minesweeping winch. 0.015 by 0.060 styrene stripes were cut and then glued together at an angle, these were married together with some of the brown plastic piping provided in the kit for railings.

http://i.imgur.com/ls0LFDY.jpg

What is not in that picture are the small discs cut from the brown piping to fit at the bend in the break support and one at the short end (the break pipe attaches at the top of the long arm and connects to the pressure bands on the drum). I may add a pair to the bottom of the break support to the bottom of the drum…but we will have to see if I have room when the thread is added.

Meanwhile I built three styrene staffs, with another little pit of brown piping to serve as the pivot upon with the break support sits. In this photo you can also see the steam motor which ran the gears to provide power to the engaged drums (I made it from some tank treads cut down, brown piping, two kit stanchions, some round sprue from the kit and lots of left over styrene – failed parts/shavings).

http://i.imgur.com/FDKOALK.jpg

Next stage with breaks added, the turning handles, etc.

http://i.imgur.com/PhNgPpS.jpg

More to follow as next I have to tackle that worry of mine, the minesweeping floats…

The long painting and converting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
16-10-2009, 17:44
Now that the winch is nearing completion I tackled the item that has had been worried from the start and that is the minesweeping floats (dolphins). In the end I decided to make them from scratch as buying an aircraft kit to cut off some tanks was not in the cards and my searches for spare fuel tanks also came up empty.

I purchased a bag of wooden furniture plugs (each plug is about two inches long) of the right diameter for the widest portion of the dolphin. An old Ikea plug cut in half would provide the tail. I drilled a hole in each for some piano wire to give the join strength and then secured them together with some 5 minute epoxy.

http://i.imgur.com/2YqZnxr.jpg

Next came the Mini-Dremel and I sanded down the wooden plugs to a general dolphin shape.

http://i.imgur.com/eSXa48j.jpg

Then some two part epoxy putty to fill in the gaps (thread marks in the plugs).

http://i.imgur.com/3OnUCUC.jpg

This will be followed by some car primer to help smooth it out and more sanding.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
16-10-2009, 18:08
Minesweeping floats. I sprayed them with some grey automotive primer, and while I was letting that dry I started some work on the racks they would sit on.

First I built a simple frame out of angle bracket styrene and then some 0.015 by 0.125 styrene for the ends:

http://i.imgur.com/mixn5iW.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/5kMxQTi.jpg

Then I sanded the now dry floats one more time to smooth out the raised areas left by epoxy putty. I followed this with some 0.020 styrene to make the tail and stabilizers (securing them with superglue - a little 0.020 by 0.020 stipes added some strength to the vertical fin glued to the end of the float), and then some 0.010 by 0.060 stripes to build the brackets. A quick trim of the flat styrene at each end and I have two minesweeping floats.

http://i.imgur.com/1lTx4ix.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

de Selby
16-10-2009, 18:40
In the navy / Yes, you can sail the seven seas / In the navy ... In the navy / Come on, protect the motherland / In the navy ...

Great stuff Captain B! I'm not much for historicals but the detail work you are putting in really is impressive.

Captain Brown
19-10-2009, 23:33
Thanks de Selby,

So I have built a minesweeping winch and a pair of minesweeping floats, up next was the two davits used to launch and recover the floats (and hoist in depth charges for the aft depth charge rails).

For a base I pulled out the two bases for the Oerlikons, I added some thicker styrene rod from the mixed bag and cut out discs of smaller tubes to fill the top. Then I drilled two holes, one on each side for the turning hand cranks.

http://i.imgur.com/Ikc9YvQ.jpg

The arms of the davits I built from 0.020 thickness styrene cut from the plans in John McKay & John Harland's Anatomy of the Ship - The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ, the davits are basically two identical halves (arms) surrounding the blocks. I purchased a mixed bag of round styrene tubes from Evergreen and it has been extremely useful and I cut out discs to represent the wheels for the davits (large ones for the end and smaller ones down the middle. Then a bit of plastic rod at the bottom to allow the davits to swing freely until I decide on which angle to glue them.

http://i.imgur.com/aX02jyi.jpg The eye bolts at the ends of the arms were made from small discs cut from the styrene rod and cut in half to create the ring.

Then I built the winching gear box out of two small squares of sprue, first was the smaller angled piece, since the sprue parts are usually angled to a narrow side I just matched a segment to my paired arms. I then made a diagonal cut to match the angle of the arms. Then I cut a small cube of larger sprue and squared the edges and drilled a small hole all the way through (this was for the hand cranks), before attaching to my angled piece.

http://i.imgur.com/NohzgNO.jpg Hand cranks are made from piano wire.

The long painting and converting war continues…

CB

colhodg
20-10-2009, 09:21
The level of scratchbuild detail on this is extremely impressive, 10/10 for dedication to detail, know this one is going to be a long hall project but already looking forward to seeing all the nice little details together.

Remember going to Grenwich Naval College (london) as a kid and seeing all these incredibly detailed ship models, something really compelling about the detail - ie the more there is the more it drags your eye into the model (if that makes sense!)

Auzu
20-10-2009, 09:58
Following this log with great intrest having been sunk by a flower corvette more than once in Silent Hunter 3.

Captain Brown
20-10-2009, 19:59
Thanks guys, a little more progress...

Next part of the stern fittings was the depth charge rails. Now my original plan was to just scratch-build my own, but after looking at my timelines and taking a closer look at the drawings from John McKay & John Harland's Anatomy of the Ship - The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ, I have decided to just use the kit parts with some adjustments. First thing was to cut off the last segment of each set of rails and from the removed segment I cut off the curved loading rail. Now one set of rails would have been for regular depth charges and one set would have been for ‘heavy’ charges which carried an extra weight.

On the depth charges themselves I think that I will be cutting off the extra extensions on each depth charge in the kit (they are too wide when the scale is checked), leaving one side on to represent the ‘heavy’ charges.

http://i.imgur.com/iUjGxHF.jpg

So I may still have to narrow my rails by cutting out some of the cross braces. I have already started to sand down the parts to make them narrower and more to scale.

Here is the sweep gear as it stands right now (minus the winch as there was not room in the photo…gives you an idea of how crowded it is going to be back there).

http://i.imgur.com/ZPbpPUn.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

GundamMecha
21-10-2009, 14:37
Wonderful, it's really starting to take shape and now really looks like a boat!

How will you display this? On a custom made boat display stand or on some kind of scenic ocean base?

Captain Brown
21-10-2009, 17:35
Thanks, funny you should mention where I intend to display it...I do not know. I am intending on mounting it on some lamp finials.
Here is what they look like:
http://i.imgur.com/actm9Q8.jpg

Here is what they look like when the ship is mounted on them…what do people think?
http://i.imgur.com/Z88NNxs.jpg
Since I have not filled the hull with expanding foam or secured the screws I am still able to change the supports. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Perhaps a glass case in the future, but for now just on a base…so I am doing my usual reinforcing and endurance testing I perform on my gaming models.

The long painting and converting war continues…

CB

Nkari
22-10-2009, 01:26
Deserves a diorama imho.. high seas.. =)

Captain Brown
23-10-2009, 18:47
No, it is for a Wardroom rather than my den so a diorama is not in the cards, perhaps if I do another.

In the meantime, So next up is the bridge, while I seem to be moving from section to section…the truth is I am. I want to make sure I don’t get too bogged down in a particular area. Also helps when I start to get frustrated with a particular part.

Bridge for CHILLIWACK in her 1942 configuration was the original mercantile bridge that had been modified with extensions on the wings and an armoured shield covered by splinter mats. So I adjusted the bridge from the drawings provided by Bob Pearson as his were for a British owned RCN Corvette (like ARROWHEAD, TRILLIUM, etc). Next I added a 17 mm high shield made from 0.040 styrene around the front and extended sides (the aft portions just had canvas dodgers over railings). The shield then had it’s wind shield made from very, very small triangles of styrene glued at regular intervals along the top and a 0.010 by 0.080 strip to make the actual wind deflector…making sure to leave a very tiny empty strip below to allow water to drain. The purpose of this wind deflector two twofold, to help break up any sea that reached that far as well as push the wind away or more accurately deflect it…any one who has stood on an open bridge in a storm knows how strong the wind is once it reaches the bridge.

http://i.imgur.com/Exsg5UP.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/t4sL0r7.jpg

So I was feeling very proud of myself when I looked at the pictures a little more closely…specifically how high the pilot house sits in relation to the shield.

http://i.imgur.com/2plSb3p.jpg

Therefore I needed to raise the shield to make it look more accurate…several paired strips of 0.020 by 0.020 styrene were needed to do this and I ended up with this:
http://i.imgur.com/1HsGtAV.jpg

Just ignore the chips and nicks on the front shield, I had a little trouble with my first attempt at adding splinter mats. I made some from modelling clay and some from epoxy putty and was happy with neither, the kit mats are really, really too plain and uniform.
http://i.imgur.com/Srbpf1f.jpg

In this picture you can even see some of the bridge sagging which was a major problem for RCN Corvettes.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

sheep
24-10-2009, 02:34
Looking good Captain, the detail is stunning, I like the concept you're going with with the display podium, but i can't help but think, if its on long term display that it will get fairly dusty if is not in a cabinet.

Cheers

Sheep

Captain Brown
27-10-2009, 16:54
Well the hope is that if I win the competition then I will be provided with a glass display case. ;)

Now that I have been working on the model for a while I decided to review my original plan and see what I have accomplished and what is still to be completed and what is to be modified…

Hull
Complete - Removal of a portion of the upper deck to forward of the bridge
Complete - Extra-large keel ground off
Complete - Stem needs to be removed and rebuilt
Complete - Bilge rails are way too large and thick, replacing with plasticard
Complete - Extra Portholes Covered
Complete – Extra Scuppers Covered
Dropped (Since the West Coast Corvettes seemed to have the eyebrows I will leave them on) Port Hole Eyebrows…torn as the West Coast ships seemed to have these
Complete - Stern needs to be flattened out and pulled to make sure there is room for Minesweeping gear and the Canadian stern
Additional Work - Also had to cut out new scuppers.

Deck and Fittings
Complete - All decks needs to have the fake reversed wood panelling taken off
Complete - Well deck needs to be scratch-built
Complete - Some water tight doors and other materials for the foc'sle
Additional decking added at the stern of the engine casing
Windlass, this is going to have to be built from scratch or a substitute found
Anchors need work and the hawse pipe is a joke
Complete - Hull Splinter Shields; on the forward ones I think I will have to move the placement as some of the West Coast Corvettes had them added slightly inboard
Lockers all need hinges and detailing
Wooden decks added forward and aft and in the well deck area
Mast…kit version is too short for short foc'sle and the SW1C/SW2C is missing
Life Boat Davits need lots of work
Boat Deck needs to be scratch-built and wood planking added, it will need lots of work as the kit is dearth in details here
Oval Life Rafts, need some work, not that bad
Partially Complete - Life Boats, fortunately 1942 the smaller square stern life boats were in use and not the Whaler…but major internal work will be required. Things like oars, rudder, ribs, thwarts, etc.
Hatches need detailing
Dropping (going to use the kit ones) - Rectangle Life Rafts still debating if I want to make a pair
Rope & Cable Reels need detailing or replacement
Complete - Small Ventilators need detailing
Need to scratch-build blake and bottle screw slip

Bridge
Complete - A new bridge will need to be built for the Short Focsle version
Search Lights need some pretty major work
Bridge Deck needs wood planking
Bridge Ladder Moved
Radar Lantern House…depending on early or late 1942 will determine if I need this, it needs a door, holes in the grate, etc.
Bridge Supports, again a pre or post 271 Radar set addition (CHILLIWACK had parts of the set added on repeated visits to Londonderry with the set being completed in December 1942)
Windshield…I will think of something
Complete - Bridge Splinter Shields/Splinter Mats…kit ones are a little sparse and the whole Bridge needs to be rebuilt for a type B design
Pipe Rails added instead of the fake flat plastic in the kit which look fragile and not really accurate
Rail Dodgers see above, going to built the pipe rails and then add some tissue paper
Complete - Wind dodger needs to be scratch built
Flag Box needs a complete replacement
Assorted Lockers need hinges and butterfly clips
Signal Light Platforms replacement or major conversion work
Complete - Deck House Ladders need replacement
D/F Coil, replacement with a round version
Bridge Voice Pipes need some detailing

Engine Room Casing
Complete - Needs to be shortened and corrected for Canadian version with overhang and struts
Complete - Move the 2 Pdr Bandstand aft
Complete - Engine Room Skylight…needs to be completely rebuilt as the kit version is wrong on so many levels.
Complete - Watertight Doors…the kit versions are really poor
Complete - Galley to be removed and moved aft of bridge
Complete - Funnel has had a styrene shell built with rivet detail
Dropped (Going to use the kit part) - Funnel Ladder, kit version is pretty simple
Steam Pipes on Funnel
Complete - Large ventilators really need some work as the kit versions are simple and too thick
Placement of gear and other changes are necessary

Weapons
4-inch Main Gun & Shield replacement or a complete scratch-build
Complete - Bandstand for the above will need treads and a replacement for the ammunition holders as well as some mesh and other detailing
2 Pdr (working on deciding if I am going to do early 1942 or late 1942…as early actually seemed to have a 20 mm Oerlikon in the rear bandstand while late had the 2 Pdr - if someone knows when I would love to know). Either way a replacement of complete scratch-build looks necessary
Complete - The 2 Pdr Bandstand tub needs to be replaced and a tread added
Bridge Weapons - either 303 Lewis Guns or 50 Cal twined Machine Guns look like the fittings for 1942. As per the 2 Pdr a completely new build will be necessary as the kit parts are really quite poor (again, no confirmation seems available)
Complete - Depth Charge Throwers…these are not bad…OK they are bad, about the level of the other weapons, I think some framing for the base and a little detail work will make them acceptable. Depth Charges are a little weak, but with some cutting off of extra parts and some paint detail they can work. The stalks are really too small and will have to be replaced, as well as stalk carrier detail.
Dropped (Going to use the kit parts with a lot of sanding) - Depth Charge Racks, too thick and too large, so some platicard replacements look necessary
Smoke Candle Racks…I think there is some sort of thick box that the kit provides
Floater Nets & Racks
Smoke Candles need some holes drilled

Minesweeping Gear
As this was not removed until the foc'sle extension I need to scratch-build the lot
Complete - Winch
Complete - Davits (x2)
Complete - Large Minesweeping Floats (x2) Otter/Kite Floats (x4)
Gallows (x2)
Dan Buoys and racks

So the build is progressing...slowly.

Because I always like to have at least one picture with an update here is the bridge with splinter matts added. (I tried making some with clay, some with epoxy putty and finally just used the kit ones with a lot of filing)

http://i.imgur.com/HUStmM2.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Bladelord
27-10-2009, 21:47
I've always had a certain weak spot for naval ship models, and have built together some myself. Seeing your work is joyous, to say the least. You're doing the vessel perfect justice. :)

Since you'll hardly need too much good luck with the contest - seeing as how the corvette is turning out - I'll merely compliment you by stating that your work and methodical approach is a true inspiration. 40k wet-naval ships and some real world kits seem very tempting all of a sudden...

sigur
28-10-2009, 14:19
A few questions/comments: Where will the 32 heavy bolters go? (I think the rule of thumb is 1 heavy Bolter per 3 square inches of surface) Will you magnetize it so you can swap weapons between battles? You don't plan to use these flying bases in tournaments, right? Because they are totally illegal as they are now. :cheese:

Seriously, this is a great log with amazing attention to detail. Shows real dedication. To me, historical modelling always seems like the somehow "higher tier" modelling compared to the fantasy or wargaming stuff I do nowadays. I know, many won't agree with me there but that's how I see it. Meeting historial accuracy is darned impressive and it's all about details.

Anyhow, great work so far, keep it up!

Codsticker
29-10-2009, 03:52
To me, historical modelling always seems like the somehow "higher tier" modelling compared to the fantasy or wargaming stuff I do nowadays. I know, many won't agree with me there but that's how I see it. Meeting historial accuracy is darned impressive and it's all about details.


I agree; the accuracy required for the model to be "complete" is what bumps it up a tier higher than fantsy/sf modelling.

Captain Brown
29-10-2009, 18:39
Thanks guys, afraid there will be no Heavy Bolters...although she will have at least two pairs of 50 Calibre machine guns (perhaps four pairs if I can confirm the weapon(s) in the aft bandstand).

So far it has not seemed that much different (sci-fi versus historical)...although instead of GW paints for 'accuracy' I am buying WEM colour coats in jars. (smilie - darn image limit)

Some more progress, I started working on the Boat Deck (or Funnel Deck depending on who you ask); adding ladders and some railings, (looks like I am going to have to make some stair railings out of piano wire) also added the small platform to access the two galley doors.
http://i.imgur.com/BG2A0xJ.jpg

The mast was going to be tricky, not only was I moving the mast forward on the model, but I was also lowering it a deck...actually two decks with the moving forward of the focsle. (RCN Corvettes built for British accounts had the mast on top of a raised galley amidships…which is what is supplied with the kit and thus too short…really too short) So now the mast sat at the front of the well deck, with a clamp at the focsle deck level.

I started by removing the plastic angled pin at the base and measuring how much additional mast I needed. Then I selected the styrene tubing that was a close to the diameter of the base of the mast as possible. The one I selected was hollow and needed another tube inserted to make a solid cylinder. I did leave a little extra of the filling styrene tube and this will act as a guide to help seat the mast properly later on.

Then I drilled a 2 cm deep hole down the center. A similar 2 cm deep hole was drilled into the base of the existing mast and a 4 cm piece of piano wire was inserted to make the join strong (this took a very long time as drilling a 2 cm hole is not easy with a pin-vice).

When the two parts were joined I used plastic glue rather than epoxy, banking on the grip of the melted plastic to hold in the wire.

Then I took a piece of the next largest styrene tubing and cut a piece larger than my addition and started sanding down the end. I also sanded some of the original mast where the join was to narrow it to the same diameter. Then I applied the larger tube like a sleeve to create the continuous and gradual increase in mast diameter.

Here you can see the join as well as the mast bracket made from the next size up of styrene tubing and some 0.2 thickness styrene…you can also see roughly how it will sit on the deck.
http://i.imgur.com/m1hmEq9.jpg
So with the mast and the additions to the Boat Deck I have this for a mock-up:
http://i.imgur.com/7jvKCEz.jpg
What this has highlighted is that my angling of the bridge to adjust for the rise in the deck is a little too great…my bridge is sagging forward. :( So I will have to do some repair work before I secure it to the deck. Mast also has not bee glued in so that is why it is raked so far back.

And a view looking down, sorry no tripod to hold the camera steady:
http://i.imgur.com/OZD6Unk.jpg
You can see how crowded the Sweep Deck is going to be:
http://i.imgur.com/Liv9ayt.jpg

Next up is the expanding foam to fill the hull and then I will glue the deck down and some quick fittings for the bulwarks and I will start to paint it.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
12-11-2009, 19:27
Sorry I have not posted in a while, work, staff college and events around Remembrance Day have been keeping me quite busy. I did have a fascinating discussion with a veteran who served two years in HMCS SHEDIAC, he provided me with some corrections on the build. Since in 1941 and 1942 he was an acting PO and was a Leading Torpedoman he pointed out the depth charge racks on the early RCN corvettes were straight (just angled against the slope of the deck) unlike the kit versions which have a dip near the end, so some more work will be needed on those.

Here are some progress photos from the last few weeks, work that was carried out in spare moments.

First I filled the hull with expanding foam "Great Stuff" brand filler...use carefully as it really expands. The large popsicle sticks were used to create the tumble home of the deck as the foam filled underneath. The foam provides strength to the model and makes is a little more substantial.

http://i.imgur.com/YKqJkFL.jpg

Here is the mock-up of the stern at the sweep deck (I did this so the veteran could point out what he remembered and the depth charge racks need to be straightened). The green is paint covering up my epoxy putty which filled in where I had pushed out the bulwarks and stern hull to make the square RCN corvette end vice the round cruiser version of the RN.

http://i.imgur.com/paqlMGR.jpg
The vet also pointed out there was room to walk between the closing ends of the depth charge racks as his position was to pull the pins at the stern to roll the charges off. He also said that he did not remember ever using 'heavy' charges. Based on his memory I will be placing two .50 Cal machine guns in the aft bandstand and one on each bridge wings.

Next part of the kit that needed work was the bases for the davits, the kit just makes plastic pyramids, when the real ones had sections cut out to save on weight, steel and allow drainage.

http://i.imgur.com/NW6X68n.jpg

With holes drilled and a primer coat of paint.

http://i.imgur.com/oTYWpqA.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues,

CB

StugMeister
13-11-2009, 09:35
This is really amazing work!! The attention to detail is astounding! :eek:

I'm gonna keep an eye on this... :)

old guard
15-11-2009, 16:47
I remember this kit when it was first released by Matchbox. Always wanted one and never got round to it.
Marvelous to see one being built. I shall return to browse again.

Captain Brown
16-11-2009, 19:45
Thanks guys, I have some more and a some really special pictures that are not of my model.

Some more work, started the wooden planking for the boat decks, bridge and pilot house roof.

http://i.imgur.com/wALcGHm.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/qvzktp0.jpg
I ended up using scored styrene due to my Popsicle stick method being to time consuming. So besides cutting the planks at the joins I am also scoring them with course grit sandpaper to simulate the grain.

I also need to add planking to the focsle and near the sweepdeck. RCN corvettes had these added after the initial construction and initially went to sea with no deck planking, just painted steel...which was really, really slippery. Based on what I found out speaking with veterans is that most ships had the planking added around the time the main mast was removed.

Here are four photographs from two Battle of Atlantic veterans who graciously let me scan them to post.

First from Bruce Menzies who was a sonar rating in HMCS WASKESIU, he answered my questions on the colour of the bottom of the hulls. RCN hulls were Black vice the Admiralty Anti-Fouling Red. Bruce sent these pictures taken in London in October 1944 of WASKESIU having her hull painted. He described the paint as almost a black tar.
http://i.imgur.com/IKmxOmC.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/X17n3yE.jpg
You can see Bruce here (http://www.avroland.ca/waskesiu/), and he was recently featured in the History Channel's presentation of Convoy (Episode 4).

The second pair are from Ted Paxton, who prior to his commissioning and service in the Pacific was an Acting Petty Officer in HMCS SHEDIAC 1941-42.
http://i.imgur.com/E2qVQXQ.jpg
You can actually see sailors taking a dip off the stern, one man is about to jump from the forward Carley Floats. One of the few pictures I have ever seen with the bridge wing .50 Cals visible.
http://i.imgur.com/ENOFlEW.jpg
The famous SHEDIAC Cat reaching into the bowl to grab a German U-Boat Fish.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
16-11-2009, 19:46
Crappy image limit...(yes mods are restricted like everyone else).

Here is CHILLIWACK as she stands now, still lots to do and time is running out...
http://i.imgur.com/cTEn4JO.jpg

CB

Crube
16-11-2009, 19:56
Looking great there, Cap'n

I must admit, I can't wait to see her painted... I hope it's to the same standard as the modelling - should be fab.

Captain Brown
17-11-2009, 17:03
Thanks Crube, I hope the painting works as well...going to be interesting following a specific camo pattern from an old order sheet.

First I started to shrink the depth charge racks on the stern. I did this by cutting through the cross pieces and then after sanding them down glued the two halves back together. Here they are without any post join work after the cut. (Reason for the reduction in width is both due to space of the sweep deck and the fact the depth charges that come with the kit are too long, so after cutting off the ends they tend to drop out of the depth charge rails)
http://i.imgur.com/UJv7xpk.jpg
Next step is to get them to fit and angle inwards while still leaving room to get between them for pulling the release pins at the end. After doing some more research on CHILLIWACK, based on the drawings from Burrard Dry Dock the rails aft did have a downward angle at the end. Many RCN corvettes built back east were straight as described by Ted, but the West Coast ones had an angle, so I won't need to redo them completley.

Started adding the deck fittings, such as the wooden planking on the focsle and on the sweep deck. Here is the sweep deck, you can also see a depth charge stand against the engine room casing as well as the tops of two vents just above the edge of the lower bulwark.
http://i.imgur.com/F3xmeRn.jpg

Then as a break I went back to the 4-Inch and added elevation and training wheels as well as sights.

http://i.imgur.com/A2GV0DW.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/qScpvlZ.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/VK4seQW.jpg

More to follow, since I really need to get on the forward bandstand and the shells stored there for ready use.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
20-11-2009, 17:21
I have been working on smaller deck fittings, mainly in an attempt to get the deck ready for paint. The pictures did not turn out very well due to the macros settings on my old camera and the items the camera focused on, but here they are:

Built a beef and vegetable screen to sit besides the forward companion way, due to the location and time I used a couple of deck boxes/lockers from the kit that won't find a place on the short focsle corvette (galley chimney box and starboard side hedgehog locker cut in half if anyone is interested). You can also see another vent against the superstructure.
http://i.imgur.com/V8NkGpI.jpg
That is a really ugly picture, I will make it up with the forward bandstand.

Since I am going to be putting two .50 Cal machine gun mounts instead of the 2-pound Pom-Pom I needed to sand down the mount and have added some round tubing to start to fill in the hole for the original kit swivel.
http://i.imgur.com/XVOpyxL.jpg

Now the really fiddly work, the forward bandstand has had stanchions added, ladders, ammunition davit and a raft of ready-use shells. The original drawings I have from Burrard Dry Dock have two small ammo lockers shown, but from the photographs I have found these were dropped as soon as the ready use brackets were fitted. I made those by cutting off the bottom half of the shell holders and added 0.010 by 0.020 strips of styrene to represent the top of the bracket and some 0.015 by 0.060 to make the forward support. Now they look more like the metal brackets that held the 4 inch shells.
http://i.imgur.com/Lan8Opz.jpg

Some minor work on the boat deck to place the mounts for the two 14 foot lifeboats.
http://i.imgur.com/Zl1mMhy.jpg

And finally a look at the model so far:
http://i.imgur.com/uuT3HPr.jpg

Next I need to finish the windlass and some hand rails.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

GundamMecha
20-11-2009, 22:51
Wonderful work, the scratch building with the plasticard is especially good.

Seeing it all come together now as finished boat really makes you appreciate all the hard work in the individual stages.

Crube
21-11-2009, 15:52
This just looks better and better...

One thing i did notice though, the torpedo shaped doo-hicky (see, I know the correct nautical terms ;)) in image 2, of post 77 still looks a little rough in the picture. I only mention it, as I'd hate to see you notice after painting (paint can't half show up the slightest imperfections...)

SonofUltramar
21-11-2009, 22:34
I have to say this is a fantastic log, think I've spent the last 20 minutes reading through the log so far and really do hope you get it done as it would be a crime for this model to not win the competition.

Keep up the amazing work CB

Jono

Captain Brown
23-11-2009, 18:30
Thanks for the comments,

Here is a slightly better picture of the beef and vegetable screen boxes (well better than the last one...you can just see the edge of the boxes), you can also see the davit for the ammunition hoist and some of the gun detail. There is also one of the small vents that sat outside the splinter plates, West Coast built RCN corvettes had three on each side, something I don't think I have seen on East Coast builds so it would help in photo identification when there is no ship's number. The vent was made from one of the kit stanchions...for a useless part I seem to be using them everywhere.

http://i.imgur.com/lcyEpIw.jpg

Railings for my extra stairs proved a bit problematic, at first I figured I would use some plastic railing from the kit and bend them...but I found this to be fairly weak and since this is a display model and may get bumped I needed something stronger...so piano wire was used to make railings. They are a little thiner than the kit ones, but so are the post-production stanchions I intend to use and since those will have canvas dodgers added to most I think the difference will not be as noticeable.

http://i.imgur.com/VAQPHWr.jpg
I started to add some Maroon coloured primer to simulate 'red lead' over the grey car primer...you can see a little in this picture at the bottom.

http://i.imgur.com/ZHZ4MRh.jpg
You can see my hand railings made from the plastic kit railings, I added them on the superstructure based on John McKay & John Harland's Anatomy of the Ship - The Flower Class Corvette AGASSIZ.

I also figured out what to use for the last two lockers on the Engine Room Casing (a narrow locker and one of the large Hedgehog or 4-Inch lockers cut in half from the focsle of the original kit). As well as adding ladders down to the breezeway (you can just see the top in the bottom corner).

http://i.imgur.com/IJtogbl.jpg
The green is some painters tape because that is what’s coming...priming the superstructure.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

can't_decide
25-11-2009, 21:58
This log is amazing! Truly it's great work and the amount of modifying you've done is great. Looking forward to seeing some paint get on there too.

Captain Brown
26-11-2009, 02:30
Thanks for the comment,

Suddenly it dawned on me I was missing the Carly Float racks/deck. It sat over the top of the galley doors on the RCN corvettes. So since nothing in the kit fit, I scratch built two using etched styrene for the planking, L brackets for the frame and U brackets for the legs, adjusting for the slope of the bulwarks and the boat deck.

Carley Float Rack/Deck: (Upside down view…it was the best shot of the conversion)
http://i.imgur.com/pgb9sER.jpg

A picture of the racks/deck after primer has been added…and the wood patterned styrene has a lick of paint.
http://i.imgur.com/BexWItK.jpg
Look from a slightly different angle:
http://i.imgur.com/P9o8oqt.jpg
A further look from abeam…these were the photos that turned out. http://i.imgur.com/gFfFlpw.jpg

A slightly blurry picture of the focsle, but you get the idea of the wood planking. The windlass is still a concept and needs to be built.
http://i.imgur.com/ddTCh85.jpg

A look overall…now with the black bottom and grey primer she looks a little like the RCN corvettes before the Western Approaches colours.
http://i.imgur.com/76lOjMk.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

GundamMecha
26-11-2009, 02:58
Awesome work CB, I'm feeling sea sick already!

I think the extra railings on the stairs are great, and fit the build really well.

The boyz
26-11-2009, 15:55
Wow CB, you've made some excellent progress since I last checked the plog. All the extra detail you've to the ship looks very impressive. Is there much more to add to it? before you can make a start on painting the beast.

Captain Brown
08-12-2009, 22:02
Thanks guys,

So after an enforced break due to assignments being due and late calls from work…with some invigilating thrown in for good measure I am back and have decided it is time to finish the two lifeboats.

RCN corvettes did not get the 27 foot whaler until much later (the 10 RCN Corvettes built to the British pattern and named for flowers never got whalers), so for this 1942 build I started previously by detailing the two provided in the kit in an earlier post, now I am back at them.

First thing I did was remove the 0.010 by 0.020 strip seated on the ribs and replaced it with a lowered 0.020 by 0.020 strip. Next I used some 0.020 by 0.080 styrene for the thwarts and some 0.010 by 0.060 for the knees.
http://i.imgur.com/J56pfsT.jpg
Here you can see the rudder detail:
http://i.imgur.com/aahAbd4.jpg
The rudder was actually made from bits of the original kits thwarts and stern (instead of cutting some from styrene I have tried to use as much of the kit as possible). The brackets are 0.010 by 0.020 styrene and the tiller bar was made from some styrene tubing.

So some oars and oarlocks and perhaps a water keg and some provision boxes and these are done.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
09-12-2009, 17:58
More progress, now this is the problem when you start a section without referencing the photographs. I started adding the pipe rail stanchions on the engine room casing, unfortunately I used the 3' 3 rail versions rather than the 3' 2 rail and had to remove them…sadly no stanchion survived and now I am without 3’ 3 Pipe rail stanchions. I have used 4’ 3 Pipe rail stanchions for the bridge, but for the wheelhouse I am forced to use 3’ 2 rail stanchions like those on the engine room casing, galley and boat decks.

Railings added aft on the engine room casing:
http://i.imgur.com/pCKmiwG.jpg

Looking at the funnel and boat decks…as well as the galley deck and the aft rails of the bridge, both the latter will be covered in canvas dodgers (the railings from the boat deck to the engine room casing deck are still not connected so I can separate the superstructure for painting):
http://i.imgur.com/yB1NCbi.jpg

From forward looking aft:
http://i.imgur.com/8oPzwXt.jpg

The railings were very tricky and I ended up using a pin to make sure the holes for the wire were open enough. I used super glue to secure them and general cut only straight wire to join them (I tried a little bending for the funnel deck and a few other places). The stanchions were from “Great Little Ships” and while very accurate, they were also very delicate and unforgiving if they needed too much adjustment.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
10-12-2009, 19:44
It is time for the canvas dodgers to get added to the railings for the bridge, wheelhouse and galley decks. I am not using canvas, but instead tissue paper.

Here is the first attempt for the 4’ 3 Pipe railing on the bridge.
http://i.imgur.com/nh2Lcb6.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/lfo33ql.jpg

I realize it will stop being translucent when I paint it, but it does seem a little too thin, perhaps a second layer of tissue. What do you think?

Another small addition was the galley chimney. Here is the kit version (which was designed to run aft to the funnel to clear room for the 271 Radar Lantern that was added in late 1942 and not one I am doing) with part of it cut out.

http://i.imgur.com/zP18aX6.jpg

Now attached to the superstructure, when I join the wheelhouse section to the galley section I will add a bracket to the bridge to help stabilize the chimney.

http://i.imgur.com/BDFQolD.jpg

I also drilled holes in the chimney for appearances. ;)

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Huw_Dawson
13-12-2009, 03:12
Three thumbs up Mr Brown!

When did it become possible to post 6 images in a post? :confused: :p

You should do a German sub next, they're always fun. :)

SonofUltramar
13-12-2009, 10:33
Three thumbs up Mr Brown!

When did it become possible to post 6 images in a post? :confused: :p

You should do a German sub next, they're always fun. :)

The six images has been a feature of the Project Logs area for a while know although few seem to know about it?

I second the German sub idea although if you're not to keen you could just model some water with a periscope;)

Captain Brown
15-12-2009, 21:48
Thanks guys, but likely I will build another Corvette this time with the long focsle.

Now for an interesting story, as I have mentioned several times in the build log I have been unable to find any record or image of gun art for CHILLIWACK, every photo I have found lacks that famous RCN hallmark. The Gun Art book also is missing any mention of CHILLIWACK.

Then out of the blue I received an invite to see some new stained glass added to Vancouver Christ Church Cathedral due to my role in the navy and what was sitting in the middle of the first panel?
http://i.imgur.com/Vs6vxpl.jpg

Now the artist made this from a sketch and the colours are assumed based on the shading…

This is an example of a scan of a photo sent me by the North Shore Museum…notice no gun art:
http://i.imgur.com/kGgtUSE.jpg

I have finally found a CHILLIWACK veteran and hope to speak with him within the next few weeks and will ask if he remembers the art.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Grisnik
16-12-2009, 21:20
The amount of detail you are putting into this is amazing.. right down to doing the research and getting to have conversations with veterans that were on the vessal when it was in use..

Going to look great when it is all done.. hopefully the judges think so as well..

Captain Swoop
23-12-2009, 11:45
Good stuff so far. Where did you get your extra ladders for the wheelhouse etc?

Captain Brown
30-12-2009, 20:15
Thanks guys,

Captain Swoop, I used some railroad steps in 1/100 scale, they are not quite steep enough, but close enough for a good compromise.

After speaking with several veterans (one navy and the other merchant marine) it seems that the gun art was lacking from CHILLIWACK and that this badge was a later addition...notice the yellow "explosion"...that really looks to be the top of the stylized Maple Leaf added to some corvette's funnels in 43 and 44 to differentiate RCN Corvettes from their RN counterparts and these were green in colour.

Some more progress, sorry I have not posted in a while, but I have lots to add in the next few days.

The forward railings were made from black thread and the rope stanchions from Great Little Ships. They proved a challenge to add due to the delicate nature of the white metal stanchions and I ended up using crazy glue to secure the thread and running it through.

http://i.imgur.com/msjBp2m.jpg

Same thing was done on the 4 Inch Bandstand, but this time I added some old mesh from a damaged screen to make the safety netting.

http://i.imgur.com/Dr9L2fN.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
31-12-2009, 18:33
Another update,

Mast got some more work, first I wanted to make sure the yard arm was going to be able to stand up to the stress of halyards so I added a thin brass wire beneath it.

http://i.imgur.com/U7L5TWe.jpg
I might drop it or replace it with a wire spar if it proves to be too noticeable.

I also added a light fitting to beneath the crows nest and some struts as per several photographs. The Burrard Drydock drawings did not have the crows nest as that was a later fitting.

http://i.imgur.com/jaqVnJZ.jpg

To keep the mast steady I have added some hard points made of brass to create eyes for the stays, here are a pair just aft of the focsle.

http://i.imgur.com/xxujfp9.jpg

Next up was the SW1C Radar, the Canadian 1.5 metre wavelength set that was rotated by the operator using a bicycle chain…that was how it was converted from a forward fixed mount to rotate 360 degrees.

I used a single piece of Evergreen StripStyrene 221 3/64” Rod. First I cut off a 50 mm length for the top of the radar aerial. Then a 36 mm length that was cut into 2 x 18 mm lengths, one end received a 60 degree cut and the other a 30 degree cut. A file was used to make a notch in each angled cut and for the end of the long remaining portion.

Then I glued the 50 mm piece at right angled to the long remaining portion at about 18 mm from one end. The two 18 mm pieces were glued with the large angle against the main trunk and the smaller angle against the 50 mm portion creating a yaga style radar.

A piece of that kit provided railing was then cut up make three equal parts of 8 mm long and these were glued together to make an “H” and this is the tail end of the SW1C.

http://i.imgur.com/KOuJdr3.jpg

I used the colour photo of the WEYBURN as the best reference shot I could find, it shows the radar post going down the length of the mast, so I drilled can extra hole in my mast bracket and will use some larger hollow styrene tubing cut up to make the brackets to hold the SW1C post against the mast.

http://i.imgur.com/aotkGwd.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

GundamMecha
31-12-2009, 19:12
More brilliant work!

Those lifeboats are fantastic, the attention to detail and research on this project is exceptional.

Captain Brown
04-01-2010, 18:26
Thanks GundamMecha,

Well I am getting into the final details; one part that has been long delayed is the secondary armament. Corvettes tended to mount whatever was available; about the only common fitting was the World War One 4 Inch gun forward. Although documentation today states a 4 Inch deck gun, 2 X 20mm Oerlikons, Hedgehog and 2 Pound Pom-Pom these were the fittings on later corvettes with extended focsles and the supply of secondary armament had been sorted out in 1944.

Ted Paxton who sailed in HMCS SHEDIAC had identified twin .50 Calibre Machine Guns on the bridge wings and that SHEDIAC had another pair mounted in the aft bandstand (these were later replaced with the 2 Pound Pom-Pom) and when the bridge-wings were extended and given struts the Oerlikons replaced the bridge mounts.

The earliest photos of CHILLIWACK definitely have a paired mounting of some kind aft (likely twin .50 Calibre Machine Guns) but at some point these were replaced with a Pom-Pom as a photo in 1943 when the 271 Radar was added she has the 2 pounder.

So armed with this information I decided to build four twined .50 Calibre Mounts (Browning Machine Guns) and a Pom-Pom to be safe…

First up was the .50 Cals and I started with some plastic styrene tubing, then some square and rectangular strips and cut them down to scale. I also used some more 1/35 scale tank treads which I was trimming down to make the handles at the rear of the Browning.

http://i.imgur.com/vT5QzNQ.jpg

The Brownings in their rough form, details to be added still:

http://i.imgur.com/LFOXP0n.jpg

With my first run at their mountings (I used the drawings from Shipcraft Special: Flower Class Corvettes by John Lambert and Les Brown)…it seems the mountings are a little small for bridge wings splinter shield so I will likely build some larger ones, after seeing a photo of HMCS BATTLEFORD with the high mounts I will make some more.

http://i.imgur.com/0GKsXxm.jpg

With detailing added, I think I will trim down the ends of the barrels as the Canadian versions I have seen in photos tended to be the short wide nose variant.

http://i.imgur.com/fUiQwBt.jpg

So I spoke with several more veterans about RCN corvettes. Don Bellamy sailed in HMCS CHICOUTIMI (besides several other ships) and remembered CHILLIWACK having a Pom-Pom in the aft bandstand in 1942. He described some of the living conditions and confirmed some of the minesweeping fittings for me. So it looks like I will be building a 2 Pounder after all.

Bill Hutcheson sailed in the Merchant Marine and did several trips near the end of the war, but only once did a corvette come close enough to pass a message and ask about the crew (probably to see if there were any friends or relations in the Canadian merchant). Bill has also made a model of CHILLIWACK (later long focsle version) which I hear it is quite spectacular and he says that all photos he has of CHILLIWACK have the Pom-Pom aft, but admits they are from after her focsle extension.

Peter Lynch sailed in HMCS MATANE (if anyone has any pictures of this Frigate he would be keen to see them) and sailed in concert with a few corvettes, he passed on some anecdotes of the second iteration of EG 9.

Cully Lancaster sailed in HMCS MOOSE JAW and he said that she carried two pairs of Lewis Guns in her aft bandstand. Cully was from Moose Jaw and ended up sailing in the corvette named for his home town when the assigned officer failed to make his connection and the corvette sailed with Cully taking his place…one of those “two year” temporary assignments.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Codsticker
04-01-2010, 23:51
Really incredible attention to detail Captain Brown.

colhodg
05-01-2010, 23:05
Just wanted to say this is one of my all time favourite logs for the detail alone, incredible work, hope it is appreciated.

Captain Brown
06-01-2010, 01:40
Thank you gentlemen, really appeciate that.

Almost there, just a few more parts to build.

The windlass has been a long standing project that needed to get done. The kit comes with a very simple “simulacrum” that really is sad looking.

Here are the parts:
http://i.imgur.com/TJAPSo5.jpg

Drawings from Anatomy of the Ship: Agassiz

http://i.imgur.com/ZbmrBf5.jpg

First attempt to use the kit parts…

http://i.imgur.com/WUzyDDS.jpg

That was a failure.:(

I then tried getting a windlass from Sirmar Model Fittings, here it is in comparison; unfortunately it is a different pattern than those used on the West Coast built RCN Corvettes, it appears to be an UK merchant ship design.

http://i.imgur.com/FnAZKXi.jpg

Attempt number two…

http://i.imgur.com/QyHk1F3.jpg

Due to the image limit I am splitting this update into two posts, more to follow.

The long painting and converting war continues,

CB

Captain Brown
06-01-2010, 01:44
Windlass Part Two

The more complete version, this one I am happy with.
http://i.imgur.com/pedLyeo.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/62ezJwj.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/ihqF0Es.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/jF09WHe.jpg
I made the drums out of styrene card cut into discs and glued together, gearing was with aluminum foil, stamped with the rim of a medicine bottle and glued on with superglue. Drums were made from furniture plugs sanded down with a Dremel, then some styrene added around the edge (0.015 by 0.060) and some cross pieces (0.020 by 0.020). Brake handles were made from the railing styrene supplied in the kit.

I used the base and two of the sets of rollers from the kit, and some of the railings for rod, two stanchions cut down as supports and three of the windlass parts together to make some of the motors, rest was all styrene rod and discs...and a little imagination. :)

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Captain Brown
06-01-2010, 19:26
Another update as I am pushing to have all the modelling done by the end of the week to get the painting done in time.

As mentioned above, after speaking with some folks who remembered sailing with CHILLIWACK and the best photo of the period I am building that the weapon for the aft bandstand is the 2 Pounder Pom-Pom.

So the kit variant is again almost just a “simulated” item to represent the 2 Pounder (the name Pom-Pom comes from the sound the weapon made, it was an anti-aircraft weapon designed to use up the vast stocks of 2 pound ammunition left over from the First World War) and it could only pass for the weapon from a great distance.

So I began by cutting out a shield from 0.010 thickness styrene, embossing some rivets with my stitch marking roller.

http://i.imgur.com/GRyvMqv.jpg

Then I added some more styrene to make the supporting frame using the drawings from Anatomy of the Ship: Agassiz and Shipcraft Special: Flower Class Corvettes

http://i.imgur.com/36hJPfw.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/JeRw7od.jpg

I did use the base (although I had to sand down the bottom support to fit my rebuilt aft bandstand) and I cut off most of the raised portions on the top to move the shield forward to account for the foot stands. This picture also has the side supports cut from another sheet of left over styrene.

http://i.imgur.com/NDOcOK2.jpg

Here is a slightly earlier picture of the aft bandstand with the hole that this weapon will pivot in.

http://i.imgur.com/XVOpyxL.jpg

Image limit reached (well perhaps I have one more, but this is the point to break the post in two)

The long painting and converting war continues…

CB

Captain Brown
06-01-2010, 19:26
Pom-Pom continued...

The barrel was built from styrene tubing and the muzzle cut from the kit weapon (with the end drilled out to give the impression of a hollow barrel), picture of this was too small and fuzzy to share. The breach was made from sprue as was the magazine hopper. For the magazine I used some thin styrene rod and cut into small dowels and laid them side by side, then some angle bracket was laid over the ends to make it look like an ammunition feed (you can see that the best in the top down picture).

http://i.imgur.com/jOTUHUd.jpg

Also added a pair of my home made wheels for training and elevation, plus some discs and other extra styrene rod and some kit railing material for the aiming bars…afraid my targeting rings are rather solid, but I just don’t have the fine etched brass bits to use.

http://i.imgur.com/xrqMCv2.jpg

Top down look so you can see the foot rests. These I made from plain styrene card (0.020 thickness) and them some fine screen mesh was glued on top of it to create the tread effect. You can also see the ammunition hopper on the right and a look at the top of the aiming bars. My swinging hinge is also a little warped, but other than that not to bad.

http://i.imgur.com/absx52G.jpg

The long painting and converting war continues…

CB

nanktank
07-01-2010, 00:47
This is far too fine a model to display in an officers mess, it belongs in a museum!

Captain Brown
09-01-2010, 06:08
Thanks nanktank, but our Maritime Museam is in the middle of a move and really does not have the space...actually neiether does the mess....oops.

Now that the major additions and changes have been made I still have some minor changes and upgrades. Those little things that were overlooked in the model kit and in my planning…

Starting the last of the minesweeping gear, here are the rope reels (I used the kit parts for the focsle reels and boat deck reels), I added handles made from kit railing sprue.

http://i.imgur.com/0M8PSNM.jpg

Next up for the Engine Room Casing is the Dan buoy storage which will be outside the pipe rails.

On the aft end of the Engine Room Casing I added the gong and on the aft bandstand the stern running light, which was originally mounted on the end of the deck, according to the Burrard Dry Dock drawings, however in photos it was quickly moved up to the bandstand for better visibility. Also added a ladder and a circuit box against the casing.

http://i.imgur.com/jMEx3YP.jpg

The depth charges sitting on the deck needed major work, so I simply cut off the sides to make them the right dimensions, and then added a 10 x 10 mm square cut from 0.010 thickness styrene for the holder portion of the carrier. Some styrene tubing made the stalks for the carriers and viola…instant depth charges.

http://i.imgur.com/fEGNvPG.jpg

Here are the supports added under the extended bridge wings, CHILLIWACK was one of the first Corvettes to get extended Bridge Wings…but sadly the 20mm Oerlikons intended to be placed there were slow to arrive so she kept her .50 Cal twin mounts…however it did save on the supports (once the Oerlikons were mounted they added bracing to prevent the bridge wings sagging)…although there is a picture of ALBERNI with sagging experienced with just the twin .50 Cal mounts.

Based on the photos of CHILLIWACK and some other short focsle Corvettes as these were additions beyond the initial drawings I have of CHILLIWACK.

http://i.imgur.com/Wd5d8u6.jpg

Speaking of mounts, here are my second, larger versions:

http://i.imgur.com/aI8BLSG.jpg

I also found the photograph I am using shows that CHILLIWACK added some splinter mats to the canvas dodgers on the 4 foot pipe rails on the bridge so I made six more out of epoxy putty (I am especially proud of the one sagging at the top corner as a line has come loose). I also added another locker and finally the MF/DF navigation coil made from kit railing rod and some extra sprue.

http://i.imgur.com/TG6STgk.jpg

Dan Buoys and a few bits and bobs and I will be done construction.

The long painting and converting war continues...

CB

Mega Nutz
09-01-2010, 09:56
Very impressive build...........

Remoah
09-01-2010, 11:38
*oh*
And i just chubbed up :P

Excellent work mate, cant wait to see more of this.

sandman36
10-01-2010, 05:25
I am really enjoying this work. You are doing an amazing job on your research.

GundamMecha
10-01-2010, 17:51
I agree, amazing research and total dedication to accuracy, very impressive. This really is a labour of love!

Captain Brown
14-01-2010, 19:30
Thanks guys,

Another update,

So here are the Dan Buoys, the last main item that needed to be completed before painting:

http://i.imgur.com/wU82oPm.jpg

They are a little further aft than the drawings, but some of the photographs of the Engine Room Casing have them moved back (I suspect a correction made during construction, it was noted in research that many modifications took place during the building because the drawings from the UK had never been finalized prior to their sending to Canada...hence the mainmast still being listed and added to RCN Corvettes when first built).

http://i.imgur.com/Bshd5aC.jpg

Now I have started painting…having never used an air-brush before this has been a bit of an experience…and a messy one. The white is now on….the trouble with an airbrush is that I have to do it outside (not having any sort of space to use it with proper ventilation)…which in Vancouver weather has been quite challenging.

Spoke with Cully Lancaster and Ted Paxton again on some of the colours. Carley Floats were a grey colour and the floats for the minesweeping gear were painted an off-yellow rather than white.

Next update I should have the base coats down, just waiting for a dry day to do the Green and Blue.

The long painting war continues...

CB

andyg2006
17-01-2010, 11:17
Just discovered this, but wow! Amazing work and attention to detail, can't wait to see it painted.

sheep
17-01-2010, 22:29
Still as amazing as day one Cpat, even more so because you've kept such a high standard throughout. Good luck with the sirbrush, the learning curve is steep, but very worth while .

Cheers

Sheep

Wil Grand
18-01-2010, 22:44
You're off your rocker mate!

I'm loving your work!

de Selby
21-01-2010, 20:59
Legendary attention to detail here. Looking forward to seeing it painted.

Succurso
22-01-2010, 10:43
Really enjoyed reading through this log Captain Brown. Its been said before but the attention and dedication to detail thorughout has been really impressinve. Really looking forward to seeing the finished article - if only in photograph. :)

regards

Succurso

colhodg
23-01-2010, 10:04
Ample demonstration that the devil really is in the detail - we can't wait to see this finished and painted but again, much admiration for your dedication and research. As logs go this is a true epic!

Captain Brown
23-01-2010, 19:38
Thank you everyone for the comments, still working on it, but the deadline approaches.

Sorry, I know it seems like there has been a gap between updates, I have been busy painting and for such a large model with so many parts it is a slow process.

Here are some WIP shots of the model as it gets its basecoat. For paints I have been using White Ensign Model enamels (all based on the real paint chips of the period), Games Workshop Acrylics and Vallejo Acrylics.

http://i.imgur.com/BBZcv0P.jpg

For colours I made several checks, speaking with Ted Paxton and Cully Lancaster about colours of the corvettes they sailed in, as well as the handful of black and white photographs available. I also tried to use the colour photographs of ARROWHEAD and WEYBURN, but this last source caused some problems, because when I painted the hull it just did not look right…

http://i.imgur.com/N35mms4.jpg
(Photo source DND Archives Project Pride Ken Macpherson Collection)

CHILLIWACK looks to have been in the Western Approaches Dazzle Paint Scheme in 1942, a change from the standard grey that corvettes where painted when first built. There was a fair bit of leeway given to captains, for example Ted Paxton says that SHEDIAC’s captain had grey mixed with everything to give the ship a simple grey toned dazzle paint.

But from descriptions provided with the black and white photos I know CHILLIWACK was a little more like this:
http://i.imgur.com/gGJKPJI.jpg
I traded some emails with Bob Pearson, who did the coloured paint scheme images for the Shipcraft Special: Flower Class Corvettes

At first glance it looks like the corvette has only two colours:

http://i.imgur.com/2GT5wl7.jpg
(Photo source DND Archives Project Pride Ken Macpherson Collection)

The large dark triangles are WA Green, and the hull would be the off white of the RN/RCN.

WA Blue is so light that it is almost impossible to notice unless you look for it (so I thought I might have a bad batch and opened another tin and used a different agent to thin it for painting...and it was just as faint...or perhaps a little bolder). However the paint chips Jon Warneke and Jeff Herne showed that the WA Blue is really light and that the blue from the colour photo of WEYBURN was probably B6 or 507A. I read somewhere that CO's could replace any missing colour with 507C and Ted Paxton says his CO insisted that it get mixed with each of the colours so that SHEDIAC was a series of greys.

With that in mind you can see a slight change in colour on the 4 Inch and on the bridge wings with a diagonal, especially in this photo:

http://i.imgur.com/rVNbn42.jpg
(Photo source DND Archives Project Pride Ken Macpherson Collection)

There is even a little contrast on the dodger on the bridge deck. It also looks like the funnel and ventilators might be WA Blue (as the large hatch cover between the ventilators is probably white) with WA Green for the top funnel band.

The long painting war continues…

CB

Captain Brown
23-01-2010, 20:58
More photos in better light, now I am starting the highlights and touch-ups before the first coat of varnish before weathering.

Midships
http://i.imgur.com/6y6F0uO.jpg

Quarterdeck
http://i.imgur.com/uQcDbpq.jpg

Focsle
http://i.imgur.com/eDPHAaD.jpg

Just the base colours, nothing more at this point.

Never use any form of spray paint on thread…word to the wise.

The long painting war continues…

CB

tankworks
25-01-2010, 05:59
I built this model years ago. I found that a drinking straw was just the right diameter to fit over the depth charges and provide the lip of the end of the can when trimmed a bit proud.

de Selby
25-01-2010, 18:43
The combination of the weathering and the blue shadows on the K173 photo make it look awesome.

Captain Brown
25-01-2010, 18:47
Thanks tankworks, but I have run out of time to do any major changes, and I had to remove the sides of the depth charges to make them the right scale, I might use the straw technique to line up the red line down the centre. My photos need to be in by the end of the month.

So I have started the weathering, the soot and grime that comes from Oil fired ships who sailed in convoy with coal-fired freighters of the SC (Slow Convoys) that became the favoured targets of the Kriegsmarine’s U-Boat arm. Those who have seen my other painting logs know that I cannot leave a model with it’s pristine paint…as within minutes of painting the elements and regular use with start to corrode/chip/dirty up everything. Especially on a heavily used escort ship that sailed back and forth across the Atlantic in the middle of a world war.

First, the ship with soot and grime (rust has not been added yet), in this photo the Corvette is starting to look nearly done.

http://i.imgur.com/cGJ744J.jpg
Nothing is really glued down yet as I have to add the window glass after all sealing is done, due to time constraints I will just have a black backing on the glass so the wheelhouse and Asdic house interiors will not be visible. The grime is a mixture of black wash, water and lacquer thinner (to prevent the water tension in the wash beading). After this was applied over a glass varnish it was rubbed down with more lacquer thinner to create the streaks.

Bow
http://i.imgur.com/9UhC2hq.jpg

Midships
http://i.imgur.com/vZJ9ZpG.jpg
I have started making straps for the Carley floats (need to do some for the lifeboats next), they are simply tin foil folded over to make a strap with some cut up styrene tubing for the ring…trouble now is painting them as the tin foil is not the best medium to paint on.

Stern
http://i.imgur.com/3LzMAVe.jpg
The off-yellow floats are a little pristine still, they were actually that colour for no known reason. I have actually used a couple of GW hand grips from a tank kit to make the top bracket which was a basically the top of a large triangle, for this scale the handle is good enough.

So next up is the rust and then the rigging…just need to get the lifeboats right and add the straps...then the rust...then gluing down everything and placing the depth charges...

The long painting war continues…

CB

tankworks
26-01-2010, 07:17
A corvette is one ship that the weathering cannot be over-done on! The war-time paints coupled with the conditions under which they were painted caused the finish to deteriorate rapidly and great chunks of paint would slough off exposing the metal or previous paint underneath. Your ship is looking good by the way!

sheep
28-01-2010, 10:32
Amazing mate, how did you find the airbrushing?

Cheers

Sheep

Captain Brown
28-01-2010, 18:29
A corvette is one ship that the weathering cannot be over-done on! The war-time paints coupled with the conditions under which they were painted caused the finish to deteriorate rapidly and great chunks of paint would slough off exposing the metal or previous paint underneath. Your ship is looking good by the way!

Thank you tankworks. In the interest of time I have had to forgo some of the planned paint chipping (there is some forward at the anchor and I may add some after, but for the photographs which are due next week it will be grime and rust, as if she was painted at anchor and has departed for another convoy).

By 1942 most of the un-milled steel issues had resolved themselves because the grime layer had already worked through the previous navy grey schemes in 1941. Normally there would also be lots of chips and sanding at midships due to Corvettes grinding against one another in St. John's harbour.

I still have to do the rigging...


Amazing mate, how did you find the airbrushing?

Cheers

Sheep

Thanks, I used it just for the base colours, due to a lack of facilities I can only do the spray painting outside and Vancouver weather and two jobs don't lend themselves to finding good weather and sufficient light to paint.

Added the rust, I used some weathering powders, burnt umber oil, and lacquer thinner. I added it to the decks in the scuppers and drains, as much of the rust particulate would make its way there after getting washed down with rain and sea spray. I did a wash of black ink with lacquer thinner first, so it blended with the rust as grime and soot would have. Then I streaked some from the scuppers down the sides of the hull and from the hawse pipe. The anchor chain also received a healthy dose as in a ship the anchor cable has the links banging against each other constantly and is one of the first places rust starts to build from.

All these photos are without rigging (for mast, davits, cranes, hoists, etc), and the port holes are still covered in tape…just noticed that. ;)

I did less rust on the upper works, as this is where the ship’s company would have tried to battle the rust build up with paint…so what rust I did use I diffused with extra lacquer thinner where it could be reached easily.
http://i.imgur.com/DMibYA5.jpg
Here you can see that I added the canvas straps for the lifeboats (made from 0.010 by 0.060 styrene strips), something quite prominent in most photos.

So I glued down the superstructure and added the depth charges. Here you can also see the lines added to the rope reels for the Dan buoys as well as one of the Carley Floats.
http://i.imgur.com/trVTHU6.jpg
The straps for the Carley Float were made from tin foil and a slice of styrene tubing to make the ring.

Another picture of the forward Carley Floats, additional floats were added aft due to the increase in crew size and the fact some Corvettes were known to drop floats near sinking vessels to aid in getting survivors out of the water.
http://i.imgur.com/Z0zQdLJ.jpg

One more photo showing the depth charges, this photo also shows some of the grime and soot that has run off the funnel casing deck.
http://i.imgur.com/84hVQ6W.jpg
Still need to add rigging, including the three colours of thread based on the drawings from Warship Perspectives: Flower Class Corvettes in World War Two by John Lambert.

The long painting war continues…

CB

Crube
28-01-2010, 18:44
Keeps getting better and better.

Deadline getter closer though. Still confident of making it?

Captain Brown
28-01-2010, 22:59
Keeps getting better and better.

Deadline getter closer though. Still confident of making it?

I had better!

So the focsle has had the gun mount (forward bandstand) secured and the 4 inch presently can rotate…going to leave that until I am certain of a direction to aim it. The anchor chain was secured and presently they do support the weight of the two plastic anchors.
http://i.imgur.com/yi3kIdN.jpg
At the bow you can see some of the grey of the undercoat peaking though some damage, probably as the anchor was raised. You can also see the draught marks right at the stem.

I added clear plastic to represent the glass windows in the wheelhouse and the ASDIC Hut.
http://i.imgur.com/9XBMs2w.jpg
I was going to place black styrene behind them because there are no internal fittings in either space, but they did not look right, as it is the inside bulkheads, decks and deckhead have been painted flat black.

Another picture of the bridge, you can see the voice pipes forward of the ASDIC hut, and there is even a pipe coming from the crows nest snaking in just between the mast and forward bridge shield.
http://i.imgur.com/uuxzCYO.jpg

The Minesweeping Gear on the sweep deck aft. I just had to dirty up the yellow minesweeping floats.
http://i.imgur.com/rtpKOnB.jpg
Depth Charges have been added to the rails and I even added the locking and release bars.

The long painting war continues…

CB

Lt.DustyMillar
29-01-2010, 09:47
this is a beautiful model and the attention to detail is just great. My grandfather served in the RN HMS Kingcup during the early war and i have often thought about building one of these kits. this is really inspiring me to give it a go.

great work!

Burnthem
30-01-2010, 23:30
This is fantastic, the weathering is spot on, 'tis a bit unfair on the others in the running don't you think, none of them have a chance! :D

Captain Brown
31-01-2010, 19:57
Thank you gentlemen,

Well my time was up Friday night as I had to get the photographs in for mailing on Saturday.

On went the rigging (in black, white or tan thread as per the rigging diagrams I located).

Here is a bow and quarter view.

http://i.imgur.com/iAwQ3Jp.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/MIOffXx.jpg

Only inaccuracy I know of was I had to and a preventer stay to the ensign staff since the flag was a little too heavy and caused some wilting (actually I have one other with two missing portholes on the starboard bow). Flag is an accurate cotton in miniature form from BECC Model Accessories (they were a great on-line store and even let me return some flags when I ordered the wrong size) and has been dipped in Orange Pekoe Tea to give it the weathered look.

Lots more photos to follow, but I thought I would put these up in the meantime.

The long painting war continues...

CB

tankworks
01-02-2010, 07:55
Nice work. I built the Eyebright after her foc'sl was lengthened but she still retained the charthouse and had the mast moved behind the bridge superstructure and had the 'lighthouse' radar installation.

Crube
01-02-2010, 09:16
Looks great Capt B.

Fingers crossed you win. Any idea when you'll find out?

Romanus
01-02-2010, 09:31
Really nice work mate, I've been lurking on here following your progress since this logs inception and the attention to detail has been superb along with the painting and weathering. 5 stars mate, and good luck.

Cheers,
Rom

Tommygun
01-02-2010, 10:30
That's a beautiful and well worn ship, as it should be.
The first time I saw the wood panted I thought you had added real wood.
I like the scale too.

colhodg
01-02-2010, 12:17
run out of superlatives but congrats on getting her finished - the brass stands look perfect, not too showy and the rigging and railings really give a sense of realism. You don't often see ship models with proper weathering - esp to the standard you've achieved so this really will be a unique peice with all the detailing. Best of luck with the competition.

Succurso
02-02-2010, 17:02
Good luck Capt!

I know you mentioned some peices you werent happy with but that is the bane of all modellers.

I do think though that this is a beautifully realised model and you have done yourself proud with it.

Regards

Succurso

Captain Brown
02-02-2010, 17:13
Thanks guys, appreciate the comments.

The contest itself has the winner announced the first Sunday in May to coincide with the Battle of Atlantic Memorial Parade. I really did the model to make one, the contest is a bit secondary, and more in the hopes of getting a case for it will reside in a Naval Mess and not in my house. ;)

Here are some of the higher resolution images. Again photobucket may shrink them down, but you get the idea.

http://i.imgur.com/9gE6Fmg.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/jlNVcqy.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/D9wcBGL.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/WEEOQaY.jpg

I think my attempt at a neutral background was a bit of a bust, the plastic sheet was too wrinkled and that detracts from the image, oh well live and learn.

The long painting war continues...

CB

SonofUltramar
02-02-2010, 23:35
I'd like to say well done CB, regardless of the contest this model is a winner in my book, perhaps it's because I know the time and effort that has gone into it. A very fine model indeed

Jono

Grisnik
03-02-2010, 08:31
Very well done mate.. hoping that you place first and get to show it off properly.. this is going to be a hard piece to beat I think..

Time for a rest now or are you going to be starting up a new project of this scale soon?

Captain Brown
03-02-2010, 17:56
Thanks,

Due to the tight timelines on getting the photos in for the first of the month I had to use the following three at 8x10:

Bow
http://i.imgur.com/wymtiiR.jpg

Quarter
http://i.imgur.com/8J0MMoD.jpg

Beam
http://i.imgur.com/CHycqdT.jpg

At around 20 degrees above the plane to show some of the deck fittings. Which meant that the photo finishing store where I got them printed needed to trim off some of the photos a cropping and leaving a band of white at the top, I did not mind as their first attempt they trimmed off the bow and stern of the beam view and the forward end of the bow view.

That is all they will actually judge on, I added in a few extras at 5x7 to show more detail. I would have liked to have done these at 8x10, but the contest was specific in that the whole ship must be visible in each photo.

Here you get to see the run of the ship and how many fittings have been added.
http://i.imgur.com/jOlKU6I.jpg

Here the bridge detail is shown.
http://i.imgur.com/tBFiIaj.jpg

Lastly the minesweeping gear.
http://i.imgur.com/AXv7lcd.jpg

Future plans...well now that you mention it I think I want to do another Corvette...after all they had three of four distinct looks in their lifespan...sort of like Marine's and their various eras of armour. Although the next one I might not take the model all the way back to the short focsle period...which means I might use more than just the hull next time.

The long painting war continues...

CB

Wintermute
03-02-2010, 19:00
Very impressive.

If you do decide to construct another corvette make your decision soon because the Revell kit you used for this project, HMS Snowberry, has been deleted from the range and been sold to the trade for very silly, low prices ;)

Wintermutre

jdp
04-02-2010, 13:42
Very nice job Cap! Very convincing work and the scratchbuilding blended seamlessly once the painting began. I think you did a good job of weathering her up as well. Neat to see modeling skills transfer over from one format to another like this. Good look in the contest!

Leunam
04-02-2010, 15:53
Fantastic work Captain. I didn't think I had the drive to build something like this, but you've certainly given me inspiration. Thanks for the great pictures and explanations for your work. Best of luck to you in the contest.

Captain Brown
04-02-2010, 22:46
Very impressive.

If you do decide to construct another corvette make your decision soon because the Revell kit you used for this project, HMS Snowberry, has been deleted from the range and been sold to the trade for very silly, low prices ;)

Wintermutre

Where did you hear this, Revell has cleaned out most of the ship models from their on-line catalogue, but I thought they do this regularly after ending a production run and then restart it after a year or two, keeps them from shipping small lots.

CB

nanktank
05-02-2010, 03:35
Fantastic work Captain Brown! This is such a tasteful subject as well.

McMullet
09-02-2010, 17:03
Great to see this finished. It's a masterpiece!

It looks a bit like the models they used for films in the days before CGI.

tankworks
10-02-2010, 07:06
Where did you hear this, Revell has cleaned out most of the ship models from their on-line catalogue, but I thought they do this regularly after ending a production run and then restart it after a year or two, keeps them from shipping small lots.

CB

I have heard that they are going to reissue the corvette with upgraded sprues so that we don't have to toss out half the kit and scratchbuild so much.

Wintermute
10-02-2010, 19:08
I have heard that they are going to reissue the corvette with upgraded sprues so that we don't have to toss out half the kit and scratchbuild so much.

I've not heard this, but it would make sense. The original kit is nearly 30 years old and it wasn't made by Revell, but by the British company Matchbox. Revell obtained many of the molds when Matchbox ceased trading.

Captain Brown
13-02-2010, 22:57
That would be nice, but I would not hold my breath, there are rumblings that they might change the packaging of the kit to make it HMS BLUEBELL or USS SAUCY, they both appeal to a larger market.

CB

bigbauske
05-03-2010, 03:24
Nice looking model, i love the attention to the details and the realistic weathering.

Captain Brown
17-03-2010, 04:31
Thanks, so what should I do next? Another corvette or a u-boat?

CB

IncrediSteve
17-03-2010, 07:18
A U-boat seems logical. Nice change of pace, and the appropriate "other half of the story".

Stunning work all the way through, just found the log today! Can't say enough about the attention to detail, gloriously well done.

sigur
20-03-2010, 16:32
There are some very cool U-Boot kits that show the interior as well. I got one of those back in the day when I did WW2 kits and it was really interesting to work with. Maybe you can find one of those.

colhodg
22-03-2010, 09:55
U-boat cross section would be very interesting, lots of opportunity to put those fine detail modelling skills to work. If you're feeling ambitious you could sink it in resin for a diarama...

Captain Brown
07-05-2010, 22:35
Thanks guys,

Just a little update, I received a call from CPO1 McBride from HMCS SACKVILLE in Halifax and he informed me that CHILLIWACK placed first in the competition. :) Huzzah! The detail of the kit was rated as the clincher and they even went and compared the ASDIC Hut on my bridge with one that still sits in the dockyard. ;)

Another neat little event with the model happened a few weeks ago, the Vancouver Maritime Museum is going to show the model starting in a month or two to coincide with their 100 Anniversary of the Canadian Navy Exhibit.

But the best part of the whole process has been the chatting with folks here or via email on model building and speaking with the veterans who acted as technical experts and pointed out colours and the little things they remembered about their ships.

The long painting war continues...

CB

SonofUltramar
07-05-2010, 23:03
Fantastic news, well done Captain B, glad to see you getting some recognition for all the hard work you put in :)

Crube
08-05-2010, 09:14
Excellent news, and thoroughly deserved.

Well done sir :D

IncrediSteve
08-05-2010, 12:10
Museum Quality indeed! All the deserved props to you, Captain.

Post us some pics of the exhibit if you get any? :D

Magos Errant
08-05-2010, 15:00
Congrats, Captain!

I agree with IncrediSteve, post up some pics of the exhibit if you get the chance!

tankworks
09-05-2010, 23:45
Way to go Cap! We are two for two then, mine won 1st in the Vancouver IPMS show that I entered it in. Corvettes must be 'lucky' ships!

DhaosAndy
10-05-2010, 12:20
Just to add my congrats, lovely model.
Inspired me to lay in a few kits and build my first ship models since my teens, though I'll be working in 1/350.
Congrats again.

Erestor
18-05-2010, 11:46
Nicely done Captain Brown.

A truly masterful modeling experience that stacks up to the original. Don't see that everyday.

Looking forward to the next one.

tankworks
19-05-2010, 06:27
I got a friend to email me a couple of pics of my model of HMCS Eyebright which sits in a museum They are not the sharpest but will give an idea of the look of this ship.
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn242/tanker49_2008/DSC00466-1.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn242/tanker49_2008/DSC00469.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn242/tanker49_2008/DSC00470.jpg
It has suffered a bit in the 20ish years that it has been displayed!

FabricatorGeneralMike
01-07-2010, 17:21
Wow, after reading that plog I can only say : WOW!

Great job, as someone who lives in the lowermainland( port moody) all I can say is amazing job. To bad CFB chiliwack was closed. My relative ( moms cousin) was a fire fighter out there for years.

Amazing detail on the ship and congrats on taking first place. That must of made you smile when they went to the ship in the yard to see how accuretly you made the model.

Now..if I could just finish off my titan...:cries:

and so the plastic card war continues ;)

Captain Brown
05-07-2010, 17:28
Thanks guys,

tankworks - that is a really impressive diorama, really amazing seascape there, it's huge! You should check out some of the plastics stores to get a cover as the dust is what really affects models, I have already had to do a compressed air blow on CHILLIWACK waiting for the case.

FabricatorGeneralMike - I miss CFB Chilliwack as well, it was my first posting in 1993. Like the comment on the card war. ;)

Due to a planned move over the summer all my plans on a follow up model are on hold due to space requirements. So I will likely be posting some small stuff on my Sci-Fi material in the meantime.

Thanks,

CB

BeatTheBeat
12-07-2010, 09:56
Amazing to see this project finish! I've not been very good at commenting here but I've followed your log since the beginning, peeking in every now and then, and always been amazed with your attention to detail and realism. Huge congrats in making such a great model!

Cheers,
BTB

CBC
13-07-2010, 01:46
Congrats there Captain Brown. Nice to see you made it and did well to boot.

Zoring
15-07-2010, 20:49
Fantastic work on this log, not even a huge ship man but i enjoyed very much reading through this one, particularily all the obsessive detailing, fantastic.

Intrepid Adventurer
11-09-2010, 15:15
You gotta be kidding me. I read though this log with stunned amazement. That kit was insane and you pulled it off so well.

Wow... just wow!

f2k
11-09-2010, 20:56
Wow! What a build... And a well-deserved win...

I actually bought this kit a long time ago after reading The Cruel Sea. Spend a whole yearís savings on it... Sadly I was way too young to build it (only around 15 as I recall) so it never got anywhere near completion.

This thread makes me wish I still had that kit. Now I might be old enough to actually get through the build... Anyoneís got any idea as to where it might be available Ė if at all?

Captain Brown
13-10-2010, 19:34
Thanks folks, the case has still not arrived so the model was displayed in a borrowed case for a while for 100th Anniversary Displays.


This thread makes me wish I still had that kit. Now I might be old enough to actually get through the build... Anyoneís got any idea as to where it might be available Ė if at all?

While Revell has pulled all their 1/72 WWII naval kits (including U-Boats) for now they are still available online on eBay from multiple retailers. Distributors also still have the kits, I just purchased another recently.

Cheers,

CB

f2k
13-10-2010, 21:02
Thanks folks, the case has still not arrived so the model was displayed in a borrowed case for a while for 100th Anniversary Displays.



While Revell has pulled all their 1/72 WWII naval kits (including U-Boats) for now they are still available online on eBay from multiple retailers. Distributors also still have the kits, I just purchased another recently.

Cheers,

CB

Thanks. Just found a few of them. Now it's just a question of what S&H to Denmark will be...

Any chance of seeing the second one being build?

Captain Brown
19-10-2010, 17:02
f2k,

I have ordered one via eBay from a company with pretty reasonable shipping rates, if it works out I will send you the name and recommendation (I believe they are shipping by surface mail).

Would you perhaps do HMS GERANIUM which became the Royal Danish Navy's THETIS? Which since it was a pure RN construction would very much resemble the SNOWBERRY kit (unless you wanted to do short focsle - here is a photo of her from the builders yard early in the war - hence the M16 numbering and the .50 Cal in the aft bandstand vice the Pom-Pom)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v94/markwalters/Corvettes/HMSGeranium.jpg~original
Photo courtesy of Mark Walters

Yes, I am going to do another build shortly, likely a little less ambitious than the full short focsle change, instead I will do a long focsle one...although another Canadian Corvette so I will need to make some hull changes for the flat stern and the placement and fittings of boats. ;) Afraid U-Boat fans that the Type VIII will be delayed for a bit.

Cheers,

CB

f2k
19-10-2010, 19:34
I would certainly appreciate that, Captain Brown. I found two sets (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=140401823159&ssPageName=ADME:X:RTQ:GB:1123) on eBay but the shipping is unfortunately rather insane. Basically doubling the price of the kit...
So please do let me know what happens with your order...

I was actually considering doing the HMS Compass Rose. Iíve had a really soft spot for that ship since I read The Cruel Sea Ė the book that got me interested in the Flower Class in the first place.
Unfortunately, being a fictional ship itís rather hard to figure out what she would have looked like. Itís been years since I read the book so I canít remember in how great details she was described. A possibility could be to simply replicate the corvette that was used in the movie, HMS Coreopsis (K32). Another option would be to use the corvette that carried the actual number of the HMS Compass Rose. I donít recall, however, if it was ever mentioned in the book. In the movie, as far as I can tell, she had the number K49 but I have seen other numbers used on models that were supposed to represent her. If it was K49 weíre talking about HMS Crocus (K49).
A third option would be to simply look at what the early corvettes looked like in general and then combine the various features into a ship thatís somewhat close to what HMS Compass Rose might have looked like. As far as I can understand, many of the corvettes were modified in some way so it might not matter that much in any case...
I am, however, in some doubt as to whether she would have had a long or short forecastle. As far as I can tell from the pictures, HMS Coreopsis had a long forecastle. But didnít the book have HMS Compass Rose as one of the first of her class? And in that case, wouldnít she have had a short forecastle? A bit more research is needed on that one Iím afraid...

As for the HMS Geranium... Interesting... Any particular reason youíre suggesting that ship?

I also looked a bit at the four German corvettes (PA-1 to PA-4). However, information is scarce and, in any case, Iím more interested in the Royal Navy version...

Sadly, the Danish Navy never employed corvettes of the Flower Class. Would have been interesting to model a ship from my own country.


Iím really looking forward to seeing your next build. Now, if only I could get my grubby hands on a set myself...

Captain Brown
19-10-2010, 21:56
I was actually considering doing the HMS Compass Rose. I’ve had a really soft spot for that ship since I read The Cruel Sea – the book that got me interested in the Flower Class in the first place.
Unfortunately, being a fictional ship it’s rather hard to figure out what she would have looked like. It’s been years since I read the book so I can’t remember in how great details she was described. A possibility could be to simply replicate the corvette that was used in the movie, HMS Coreopsis (K32). Another option would be to use the corvette that carried the actual number of the HMS Compass Rose. I don’t recall, however, if it was ever mentioned in the book. In the movie, as far as I can tell, she had the number K49 but I have seen other numbers used on models that were supposed to represent her. If it was K49 we’re talking about HMS Crocus (K49).
A third option would be to simply look at what the early corvettes looked like in general and then combine the various features into a ship that’s somewhat close to what HMS Compass Rose might have looked like. As far as I can understand, many of the corvettes were modified in some way so it might not matter that much in any case...
I am, however, in some doubt as to whether she would have had a long or short forecastle. As far as I can tell from the pictures, HMS Coreopsis had a long forecastle. But didn’t the book have HMS Compass Rose as one of the first of her class? And in that case, wouldn’t she have had a short forecastle? A bit more research is needed on that one I’m afraid...

The COMPASS ROSE was used to encompass all the corvettes that served, but a British Short Focsle with the mast before the bridge would have been how she started, the book talks about some of the refits that the corvette went through and those would have been the extension of the focsle, moving the mast aft, adding the Hedgehog, upgrading the bridge Lewis Guns to Oerlikons, etc.

Many people model HMS CAMPANULA as that was the corvette the author sailed in early in his naval career.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v94/markwalters/HMS_Campanula1jpg.jpg~original
CAMPANULA after her last refit (so all those changes to the original completed)


As for the HMS Geranium... Interesting... Any particular reason you’re suggesting that ship?

Your Avatar. ;)


Sadly, the Danish Navy never employed corvettes of the Flower Class. Would have been interesting to model a ship from my own country.

I suggested GERANIUM as she was transferred to the Danish Navy after the war and served as THETIS. So she could be done in almost any wartime configuration or as she appeared in the Danish Navy. Not sure why GERANIUM was selected, it could have been chance, or perhaps she had a number of Danish ex-pats in her crews, many Free French Corvettes and Norwegion Crewed Corvettes served in the Battle of the Atlantic, and while most of their officers were nationals and much of the crew other members were from nations all over the world.

Cheers,

CB

f2k
19-10-2010, 22:45
The COMPASS ROSE was used to encompass all the corvettes that served, but a British Short Focsle with the mast before the bridge would have been how she started, the book talks about some of the refits that the corvette went through and those would have been the extension of the focsle, moving the mast aft, adding the Hedgehog, upgrading the bridge Lewis Guns to Oerlikons, etc.

Many people model HMS CAMPANULA as that was the corvette the author sailed in early in his naval career.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v94/markwalters/HMS_Campanula1jpg.jpg
CAMPANULA after her last refit (so all those changes to the original completed)

Thank you for the info. I was afraid that I'd have to convert her to a short forecastle in order to model an early Flower Class. Oh well, that's life...

On the first page you talked about some drawings arriving. I might have missed the info, but where did you get them from?


I suggested GERANIUM as she was transferred to the Danish Navy after the war and served as THETIS. So she could be done in almost any wartime configuration or as she appeared in the Danish Navy. Not sure why GERANIUM was selected, it could have been chance, or perhaps she had a number of Danish ex-pats in her crews, many Free French Corvettes and Norwegion Crewed Corvettes served in the Battle of the Atlantic, and while most of their officers were nationals and much of the crew other members were from nations all over the world.

Very interesting...

My Google-Fu must be weak. As far as I was able to find, no corvette was ever used by the Danish Navy. There is a Thetis Class however, and the frigate HDMS Thetis (F357) of that class. No information about a corvette with the number K16. Maybe it was reclassified when it was transferred to the Danish Navy?
Perhaps I should contact the Navy and ask for any information they have on that corvette? There might be something there...

In any case, thank you very much for the information. I've never really been a period-accurate builder and painter so this is a learning experience for me...


A bit later...

Ahhh... Searching for HMS Geranium actually gives me better results. According to this picture, she apparently had the number F340 while under Danish Flag.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v94/markwalters/Corvettes/HMSGeranium3.jpg

A bit strange, though... Iím not very familiar with the numbering system used by Navy Ships, but does the F not denote a Frigate type ship? Or am I completely wrong here?


Man, why do I have the feeling that Iím getting in way over my head here...?

Hrafn
20-10-2010, 08:22
f2k: Try this link http://www.navalhistory.dk/danish/skibene/t/datablade/thetis1945_hist.htm

Searches for Thetis in the Danish Navy can be rather confusing, since that name has been in active use since 1790 until the present! Thetis is also the name of a later class of natively build ships. These later purpose-build ships are inspection ships designed to patrol the North Atlantic and specifically Greenland.

The Thetis formerly known as Geranium was initially designated a Corvette, but subsequently re-disignated as a Frigate. This Thetis ended up as an inspection ship before being scrapped in 1963.

(I have lurked on this thread for a while - and Chiliwack is a magnificent piece of work :) )

Captain Brown
22-10-2010, 20:42
Excellent google-fu, both of you. Thank you for the comments Hrafn.

On THETIS you can still see the corvette hull lines (although the focsle has been extended even further aft a little). That forward Gun in a Mk.XIX on CP.XXIII complete with Rocket Rails...it was added to the later Improved Endurance Corvettes and the Frigates that succeeded them. The superstructure has been extended aft as well (likely for more crew accommodation) and the bridge has been enclosed. Aft bandstand has also been moved further back in the Canadian fashion to give a better field of anti-aircraft fire.

Ironically the term Frigate had fallen out of usage in the world navies at the start of the second world war, but the Canadians started calling the "Twin-screwed Corvette" design that was to supersede the corvette a "Frigate"...and eventually even the Lords of the Admiralty had to acquiesce and so the anti-submarine class we know today are a descendent of the humble corvettes...probably why Denmark reclassified their Corvette a Frigate.

From U-Boat.Net:
HMS Geranium (K 16)
Corvette of the Flower class
Navy Royal Navy
Type Corvette
Class Flower
Pennant K 16
Built by William Simons & Co. Ltd. (Renfrew, Scotland)
Ordered 25 Jul 1939
Laid down 21 Sep 1939
Launched 23 Apr 1940
Commissioned 24 Jun 1940
History: Transferred to the Royal Danish navy on 8 September 1945 being renamed Thetis. Thetis was scrapped in 1963 at Odense, Denmark.

Commanders listed for HMS Geranium (K 16)
Commander From To
1 T/Lt. Alan Foxall, RNR 2 May 1940 13 Mar 1943
2 T/Lt. Arthur Robert James Tilston, SANF(V) 13 Mar 1943 28 Jan 1944
3 T/Lt. George Wallace, RNR 28 Jan 1944 28 Oct 1944
4 T/Lt. Charles Blackshaw, RNVR 28 Oct 1944 Jul 1945 ?

Noteable events involving Geranium include:
31 Oct 1943
The German submarine U-306 was sunk in the North Atlantic north-east of the Azores, in position 46ļ19'N, 20ļ44'W, by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Whitehall (Lt.Cdr. C.L.de H. Bell, RD, RNR) and the British corvette HMS Geranium (T/Lt. A.R.J. Tilston, DSC, RNR).

Here she is in her mid-war configuration, those extra box-like protrusions aft of the funnel are the canvas dodgers over railings that surrounded 20mm Oerlikon mounts to improve her air defence. You can see the extended focsle and war-like bridge with the mast now stepped aft of the bridge.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v94/markwalters/Corvettes/Geranium.jpg~original
Photo Courtesy of Mark Walters

Cheers,

CB

Hrafn
23-10-2010, 20:11
On THETIS you can still see the corvette hull lines (although the focsle has been extended even further aft a little). That forward Gun in a Mk.XIX on CP.XXIII complete with Rocket Rails...it was added to the later Improved Endurance Corvettes and the Frigates that succeeded them. The superstructure has been extended aft as well (likely for more crew accommodation) and the bridge has been enclosed. Aft bandstand has also been moved further back in the Canadian fashion to give a better field of anti-aircraft fire.

Just a slightly off-topic comment here - the Danish source above states that Thetis received a major refit in 1951, which included a change of engines which again neccesitated repositioning the funnel. Not that it changes your comments on the visuals of the ship, but I thought that I'd better provide additional information since I can actually read Danish ;)


...probably why Denmark reclassified their Corvette a Frigate.


Not neccesarily. To my knowledge, the Danish Navy does not follow the anglo-american tradition of differentiating between Corvettes/Frigates/Destroyers according to tactical role. The Danish Navy seem to differentiate between Corvettes and Frigattes mainly on the basis of size/weight, and there has never been a "Destroyer" designation in our Navy. At least Thetis was properly redesignated - the Niels Juel class of (admittedly very large) corvettes bore the identifying number of "F" throughout much of their service...:rolleyes:

f2k
29-10-2010, 10:07
Not neccesarily. To my knowledge, the Danish Navy does not follow the anglo-american tradition of differentiating between Corvettes/Frigates/Destroyers according to tactical role. The Danish Navy seem to differentiate between Corvettes and Frigattes mainly on the basis of size/weight, and there has never been a "Destroyer" designation in our Navy. At least Thetis was properly redesignated - the Niels Juel class of (admittedly very large) corvettes bore the identifying number of "F" throughout much of their service...:rolleyes:

Ahhh... That explains it then... Iíve always wondered about the classification and the designation of the ships...


Anyway, Iíve got good news and Iíve got bad news. And Iíve got a clichť... :p

The good news is that Iíve finally found a Danish hobby store that claims to have this model in store. And not only that, but also the patrol boats and u-boats made in the same scale.

The bad news is that Iíve suddenly found myself with much more work on my hands than I have time. So this project will have to wait for a while Ė probably until, at least, the end of April.

Still, Iím tempted to buy the model now, just to have it around for when I finally get some time to look at it.

Captain Brown
12-11-2010, 15:57
Iíve got good news and Iíve got bad news. And Iíve got a clichť... :p

The good news is that Iíve finally found a Danish hobby store that claims to have this model in store. And not only that, but also the patrol boats and u-boats made in the same scale.

The bad news is that Iíve suddenly found myself with much more work on my hands than I have time. So this project will have to wait for a while Ė probably until, at least, the end of April.

Still, Iím tempted to buy the model now, just to have it around for when I finally get some time to look at it.


f2k,

I completely understand the too many projects dilemma. As for the UK distributor who I bought a second kit from I cannot recommend them. First they said they shipped in early September...then they said they did not ship as they were out of stock (this after taking my money at the beginning of September)...then they said they found the kit I bought but they had sent it to another customer in the states who also bought one (in fact they sent both of them there)...so know they are trying to sort out what to do.

I would recommend buying the kit as the producer [Revell] has pulled all their 1:72 naval kits and they are starting to go for really crazy prices on e-Bay (especially the U-Boat models).

Cheers,

CB

f2k
12-11-2010, 19:21
Sorry to hear about your troubles. It really sucks when that sort of thing happen. But what can you do...?

Yeah, I might just go ahead and order the box, just to have it on hand when I get the time to work on it. But for now, I’ve got a lot of Germans to paint ( http://www.warseer.com/forums/showthread.php?p=5115281#post5115281)...

f2k
17-11-2010, 15:47
Uh, uh , uh...!

* Jumps up and down like a kid in a candy-store *

Guess what the nice mailman had for me today... Oh yes, my very own H.M.C.S. Snowberry kit! I couldn't have been happier if he had let me lose in a LEGO shop for five minutes! :D

http://chaotica.dk/randomimages/snowberry.jpg

One cool thing is that it arrived in the original Revell packing, judging from the logo on the side of the package. And everything was completely sealed - something that the box of my old kit wasn't.

One thing that that I do wonder about, however, is the fact that the content of the box doesn't seem to be quite what I remember from last time. The rigging, for example, is different. As is the chain. Didn't Revell re-cut the set at some point in time? Perhaps, then, my old kit was one of the original kits.

Let me tell you, I've got such an itching in my fingers to start gluing. Better put the kit away for now - I've still got a lot of Germans that needs to be painted before January...

tankworks
19-12-2010, 22:08
The original issue had much more to offer. Parts and markings and instructions to build three different ships and a very detailed booklet as a modeling resource.

razormasticator
18-01-2011, 15:09
The Corvette turned out gorgeous Capt. brown. Amazing job there brother!

laudarkul
11-02-2011, 14:14
Amazing stuff. Just impressive:eek:...

Johnny_H
19-02-2011, 00:34
Sir, I just wanted to say this is amazing! I have the H.M.C.S. Snowberry kit at home. I haven't built it because I was unsure as to which Corvette I wanted to make. That and I want to ensure I do a top job!

If I can achieve half of what you have, I would be very proud of my finished kit.

Vatal
29-01-2013, 02:15
Amazing looking Kit, you wernt by chance on Ex RimPac?

Codsticker
29-01-2013, 15:49
As this project is nearly three years done I am closing this thread.

Codsticker

The Warseer Moid Squad

Captain Brown
07-09-2017, 06:21
Well I have re-opened my log to repair the broken Photobucket links, another PLOG with loads of images.

The long painting war continues...

CB