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View Full Version : Moving Even After a Failed Charge



Gormereth, the Fearmonger
15-11-2009, 14:42
So here is the situation:

On friday I played against a guy fielding a large block of Chaos Warriors made frenzied by the Banner of Rage. As a wood elf player with two units of fast cav I obviously made him play for that choice. Now at around turn 3 he fails charge once again, but then moves a mage within the unit to the opposite corner of the front rank to get line of sight for flickering fire. When I got home that night I read my rulebook just to double check because there wasn't enough time during the game to do a proper check if you can move after failing a charge.

Now through out my time playing warhammer I have played with several preconceived notions and after reading the rulebook several seem to be at odds:
1) A unit that marches cannot turn or chage formation, and a unit that turns or changes formation may not march.
2) A characters movement within a unit cost 0 movement speed.
3) A unit can make no movement in remaining moves in the turn they fail a charge.
4) A marching unit that enters difficult terrain stops moving, pro-rates their movement thus far, and may then continue at normal speed.

after reading the book I found that:
1) The rule is that "an unit on the march" may not preform maneuvers other than wheel, but does not specify at which point you count as marching (hence you may be able to turn and then start marching). (see page 15)
2) Characters are free to change positions with models in the front rank, but is the movement speed required to do so "free of charge", i.e. does the "free" refer to only their ability to move or also the cost of this move? (see page 74)
3) It never actually says anywhere that a unit "cannot" move during the remaining moves section of the movement phase on the turn they fail charge.
4) Obviously the book says the unit just stops and if I pro-rate marching on this then I logically would have to do it for the situation listed in (1). (see page 15)

So my interpretation of these are as follows, I eagerly await input and opinion as to whether my interpretaions are correct:
1) You must declare if a unit is marching before they actually start moving in Remain Moves and may not preform things like turns before marching.
2) I am unsure, leaning towards no, but I am most interested in what others think on this matter.
3) Since in a fail charge you go your full movement value and marching is "double speed", 2x what movement they have left is 2x zero, and still zero, so the unit should not be able to move.
4) I simply believe I did this wrong and marching units stop when they touch difficult terrain with no ability to go farther.

narrativium
15-11-2009, 17:16
1) Indeed, you march or you don't, turning would prevent you from marching. I tend to declare when I'm turning or reforming, as it happens less common and is the more contrary form of movement. Units moving and wheeling is more straightforward so I assume movement/marching is occurring. But in principle you're not wrong.
2) You can't move a model further than it's movement except in specific circumstances (e.g. free wheel after a charge connects). The character's movement within the unit, combined with the unit's movement, should remain within limit.
3) It's in the phase title, "Remaining Moves" - after compulsory moves and failed charges, you move the rest of your troops, which implicitly excludes failed chargers.
4) Page 15 is clear on this point.

Gaargod
15-11-2009, 18:05
Another question on failed charges, that's come up a few times:

What happens when you declare a charge with multiple units, then find that not all of them can physically fit in combat? (multi charging with stupid units to counteract that problem for example). One would assume a unit has to fail the charge, but which?

stainawarjar
15-11-2009, 18:41
Another question on failed charges, that's come up a few times:

What happens when you declare a charge with multiple units, then find that not all of them can physically fit in combat? (multi charging with stupid units to counteract that problem for example). One would assume a unit has to fail the charge, but which?

Just resolve one charge before starting the next, if that charge can't be made it fails.

narrativium
15-11-2009, 19:15
You always declare charges in an order. There are rules for grouping together several charges as a simultaenous charge if several units can all reach the same side of the charged unit, but there is a sequence.