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Varulv
05-02-2010, 04:49
For a couple of weeks now I have met other Warhammer-players from on the net, which always leads to the question "What team/race do you play?". I have played Lizardmen since I was about 12 years old (I am 22 soon) and almost always they say something like:

"Lizardmen doesn't fit in, they are not, you know, REAL fantasy."

Okay? I use to counter with:

"So Empire is?"

I hate this. I Feel all the races belong in the game but why do people keep telling me that Lizardmen doesn't fit in? Is it that they are considered to good or what?

willowdark
05-02-2010, 04:59
I wonder if they feel the same way about Trollocs and Ogier?

Some people have a real problem with variety. I can't tell you how many times I've heard people say they're glad the new Beasts don't skirmish anymore and are more like a "regular" army, without realizing that what they're saying is "more ordinary and less unique."

LM are one aspect of Warhammer that sets it apart from stock-standard Fantasy. That's a good thing.

zeebie
05-02-2010, 05:01
as fantasy has always been seen as the Elf,human,dwarf triangle against the evil hordes of deformed orcs,undead,daemons and ogre's. so lizardman are the odd ones (along with the ratmen) that most people aren't used to seeing in there fantasy world.

Wurzag
05-02-2010, 05:10
so how do lizardmen not fit in????? the old ones created the lizardman to serve them.Then elfs,dwarfs, humans ect... I dont see how any playable race does not "fit' into a game that is based on a world that is made up. Certain races started to fall out of as much use as the other armies I.E beastman,lizardman, Tk. For the past 8 years i have played orcs and goblins. But if i could go back in time and switch to lizardman i would have.I just love all the fluff behind them. I have a 3000 point orc and gobbo army. One day i will have a lizardman army but not before i fininish my 5000 point 40k orc army and then a 3-5k point nid army.

ChaosVC
05-02-2010, 05:51
I was heavily influnced by D&D draconian like lizardman and Magic the gathering volcanic desert lizardsmans designs before I was introduce to Warhammer's version which I admittedly had a difficult time accepting, a problem i never had with the former two version. Probably because I was unable to appreciate the idea of combining aztec culture with lizards, don't get me wrong aztec culture is cool...but with lizardman...it looks out of place. But eventually I got use to it after 10 years I believe. But personnally i am still a fan of Magic the Gathering and D&D's more ferral and agile looking lizardman than Warhammers version.

willowdark
05-02-2010, 05:54
Give GW credit for actually succeeding in incorporating Meso-American lore into their fantasy. I'm not sure anyone else has actually done that.

sulla
05-02-2010, 06:19
"Lizardmen doesn't fit in, they are not, you know, REAL fantasy."


It's just because they're not traditional High fantasy archetype. Y'know, goblins, dwarves, elves, dragons etc.

But they are a vital cog in the warhammer mythos. The last vestiges of the plans of the old ones and all that.

Ultimately though, you're playing toy soldiers (and have done for quite some time). Why would you care what the hell anybody else thought of your army? If you gave any weight to that, you would probably not play the game at all...

ftayl5
05-02-2010, 07:36
so theres racism in warhammer? :(
Lizzies are awesome, I just can't be stuffed painting all those scales...

tezdal
05-02-2010, 08:21
Anything involving riding dinosaurs is okay in my book.

Nurgling Chieftain
05-02-2010, 08:22
There's more to Fantasy than Tolkien. :p

Ultimate Life Form
05-02-2010, 09:52
I don't think Lizardmen don't fit in... obviously. :wtf:

However I have the feeling some of the other armies definitely don't fit in, so maybe I'm on the wrong side of the road.

The Red Scourge
05-02-2010, 10:24
Because playing around with frogs and salamanders is something best left for 8year olds ;)

Condottiere
05-02-2010, 11:00
Having come up through D&D, I find no problems with Lizardmen, and having enjoyed Budweiser commercials, I find it tragic that Slann don't do a cappella.

StarFyreXXX
05-02-2010, 12:10
Willowdark - D&D has it in their Maztica line from 1e/2e.

Sanjay

Odin
05-02-2010, 12:51
There's more to Fantasy than Tolkien. :p

I think that's it, most fantasy is just Tolkien with a few amendments. And that's basically what WHFB has at its core. But over the years it has evolved, and things like the Lizardmen have arrived to give it a touch more individuality. But people still feel that fantasy is humans, elves, dwarfs, orcs and goblins.

I have to admit I half feel that the Lizardmen don't fit, but that's mainly because they're a fairly new army. They weren't around when I started playing the game, so to an extent they seem artificially added on. I imagine that if I'd started playing when they were already around, I wouldn't notice.

Ultimate Life Form
05-02-2010, 12:54
The only reason why Lizardmen are considered outsiders is because they are the only halfway original thing that GW has ever created while all the other armies are a blatant copy-paste from either history or the works of better writers.

scarletsquig
05-02-2010, 13:07
I find Skaven, Lizardmen and Chaos Dwarfs to be the most interesting background Fantasy has to offer.

Empire also did a good job of making something genuinely unique out of a potentially boring "generic human" race.

ewar
05-02-2010, 13:11
I have to admit I half feel that the Lizardmen don't fit, but that's mainly because they're a fairly new army. They weren't around when I started playing the game, so to an extent they seem artificially added on. I imagine that if I'd started playing when they were already around, I wouldn't notice.

This isn't strictly true. The introduction of the full army in 5th ed (I believe) was just an evolution of the slann idea, which had been in various bits of fluff going back a long time, as far as rogue trader I believe... though that is from hazy memory.

I love the Lizardmen meso-american blend, though I'm biased as I have joined the ranks of the cold-blooded with the release of the 7th ed book.

Elfboy
05-02-2010, 13:29
Maybe is has something to do with the fact that they are more isolated than other races, they are on the other side of the ocean, but as far as I know they don't really fight outside of Lustria. Dark Elves have the pirate culture so pillage across the seas, and they have their war with Ulthuan too, but the Lizardmen fight Chaos and Skaven in their homeland and as such don't seem as directly involved in the battle for the old world as other races do.
Even if this is the case, they are a great looking army with a good background. The ancient civilizations of the americas mixed with cold-blooded reptiles is really cool. It works well too because those civilizations had their own mathematical systems and religions that seem "alien" or "uncivilized" to us now, but which in actual fact were pretty remarkable considering how long ago they existed. Having a race that differs so much from the others (they're not mammals) yet still has an intelligent culture based upon their own arcane beliefs works really well. IMHO they add variation and vibrancy to the warhammer world, which is always a good thing.

Malorian
05-02-2010, 13:32
I think they fit in just fine in the world of fantasy.

Nuada
05-02-2010, 13:36
"Lizardmen doesn't fit in, they are not, you know, REAL fantasy."

I'm guessing those people aren't referring to the warhammer background with that quote.

What they mean is the lizardmen fit into a subgenre of fantasy fiction known as "High Fantasy". Whereas dwarfs and elves (although obviously they are both fantasy races) are more grounded fantasy.
If such a thing were possible :)




Not played alot of D&D ..... but i think the Forgotten Realms setting is high fantasy, and Greyhawk is a darker setting. Both are fantasy settings, but there is a difference.

N810
05-02-2010, 13:48
While Lizardmen bacame an army in 5th...
the Slann have had an army since 1st or 2nd...
http://www.collecting-citadel-miniatures.com/wiki/index.php?title=Special:Search&ns0=1&redirs=0&searchx=1&search=slann&limit=500&offset=0
also there where Lizardmen... but they where a seperate force
http://www.collecting-citadel-miniatures.com/wiki/index.php/Lizardmen_-_C19_%28slotta%29
and there where space slann too
http://www.collecting-citadel-miniatures.com/wiki/index.php/Space_Slann

Nuada
05-02-2010, 13:53
the Slann have had an army since 1st or 2nd

Yep, Richard Halliwell's space frogs
(he's also one of the 3 original writers of warhammer fantasy battle, as well as space hulk, warhammer fantasy roleplay, etc. )

Sygerrik
05-02-2010, 14:38
I have honestly never heard this complaint. The world of Warhammer Fantasy is really nicely varied. There's lots of different cultural themes (Holy Roman, Medieval France, Vikings, Mesoamerican, Egyptian) and lots of different races (Rats, Lizards, Ogres, Humans, Daemons, Elves, Dwarves, Undead) and it's all very well put-together. It feels like it could be a real world somewhere, less the suspension of disbelief. It doesn't fall into the supercontinent-with-cultural-homogeneity trap a lot of fantasy settings fall foul of.

Odin
05-02-2010, 14:42
I find Skaven, Lizardmen and Chaos Dwarfs to be the most interesting background Fantasy has to offer.

Empire also did a good job of making something genuinely unique out of a potentially boring "generic human" race.

I'd also add Chaos to that list. Old Chaos anyway.

Odin
05-02-2010, 14:45
I have honestly never heard this complaint. The world of Warhammer Fantasy is really nicely varied. There's lots of different cultural themes (Holy Roman, Medieval France, Vikings, Mesoamerican, Egyptian) and lots of different races (Rats, Lizards, Ogres, Humans, Daemons, Elves, Dwarves, Undead) and it's all very well put-together. It feels like it could be a real world somewhere, less the suspension of disbelief. It doesn't fall into the supercontinent-with-cultural-homogeneity trap a lot of fantasy settings fall foul of.

I agree. It's just that I saw the Lizardmen added, as a new army. And for that reason they will always feel like a slightly articifial add-on for me, much like Ogre Kingdoms. Part of me will always see them as new armies GW has introduces, rather than an integral part of the Warhammer lore.

Spiney Norman
05-02-2010, 14:52
While Lizardmen bacame an army in 5th...
the Slann have had an army since 1st or 2nd...
http://www.collecting-citadel-miniatures.com/wiki/index.php?title=Special:Search&ns0=1&redirs=0&searchx=1&search=slann&limit=500&offset=0
also there where Lizardmen... but they where a seperate force
http://www.collecting-citadel-miniatures.com/wiki/index.php/Lizardmen_-_C19_%28slotta%29
and there where space slann too
http://www.collecting-citadel-miniatures.com/wiki/index.php/Space_Slann

Wow, the current generation of Slann have really been at the pies in comparison. Maybe thats why the first generation slann all died out, they were jealously murdered by the 2nd gens who coveted their slimness...

Bunnahabhain
05-02-2010, 15:53
I think people are just worried that a survivor dinosaur really will come stomping out of the South American jungle one day, where as they are not worried about a dragon doing the same...

Lizardmen fit in just fine. They are a nice blend of the standard, Tolkien based setting, GWs actual development thereof, and and unusual real life reference.

Also, as the references to them have been there for a long time, they don't feel shoehorned in, unlike, say, Dark eldar...

Lordsaradain
05-02-2010, 17:32
The only problem I see with lizardmen is that lustria is so far away from anyone else that it might be hard to find fluffreasons for them fighting the different races. But they are a cool army, who doesnt love dinosaurs?

Ultimate Life Form
05-02-2010, 17:37
The only problem I see with lizardmen is that lustria is so far away from anyone else that it might be hard to find fluffreasons for them fighting the different races. But they are a cool army, who doesnt love dinosaurs?

The new book actually fixed this by stating that the Lizardmen are getting more proactive lately as Mazdamundi of Hexoatl has declared they've got a bone to pick with virtually everybody.

willowdark
05-02-2010, 17:52
The book also states that many Slann consider mortal sacrifice as part of the Old Ones' plans, or at least a way to appeal to the Old Ones, and many actually send armies out to obtain sacrificial victims.

N810
05-02-2010, 17:58
You know the lizardmen have a portal system that spans the whole globe ... right?

Tupinamba
05-02-2010, 18:00
Iīve never heard that kind of complaint either. Although I personally donīt like zoomorphic races very much, in my opion Lizardmen are very cool and a very interesting add on to the warhammer world.

blackcherry
05-02-2010, 18:36
I never have had a problem with the Lizardmen. In all fairness, they were a bit of a jarring thing when I started fantasy as the Warhammer world differs to most High Fantasy worlds. Then I realised that it made the world more interesting :D.

Plus, as Frankie Boyle said

''If you're going to ignore one part, don't cut out the dinosaurs. Dinosaurs are cool!''

Kuroi
06-02-2010, 10:07
For some reason a LM army is the only one I can't seem to be willing to get into...I can't really put my finger on exactly why though...I think a large part is that I don't really find their models to be too attractive.. Also their fluff just isn't "doing it" for me. <.<

Condottiere
06-02-2010, 10:37
That's not strange, there are lots of factions you can dislike based on a single attribute, whether it's the fluff, the style or just the aesthetics.

Odin
06-02-2010, 11:47
You know the lizardmen have a portal system that spans the whole globe ... right?

Yeah, I was never particularly convinced by this bit of fluff. Always seemed like a weak attempt to make them more relevant.

Mr. Gobbo
06-02-2010, 16:44
Anything involving riding dinosaurs is okay in my book.

And anything involving dinosaurs riding dinosaurs is even better!

Reticent
06-02-2010, 17:23
At the time the unified Slann/Lizardmen army (circa 5th ed.?) was introduced its fluff really didn't fit well with the then current fluff or tone of the game (pre-Apocalyptic). High Elves were advertised as the pinnacle of magical mastery on the planet just barely holding back raw chaos from destroying the world and suddenly there were the Slann who had apparently been there all along and made High Elf magic look like child's play. Plus, the implied impending doom no longer mattered as the Slann had some master plan of the Old Ones and were on top of things- which really seemed to diminish every other factions' importance.

At the time there was really quite the backlash, worse even than what the Tau garnered in 40k.

They are both better received and integrated into the background these days.

ashc
09-02-2010, 19:11
My biggest problem is probably geographical than racial with the lizzies...

Condottiere
09-02-2010, 19:21
Access to conflict zones?

The SkaerKrow
09-02-2010, 19:40
The problem with Lizardmen is that, in the game's lore, they don't get out and do anything. They rely on others to come to Lustria, which is rather passive and keeps them out of the action in the Old World. Tomb Kings and Wood Elves have a similar problem, but they're close enough to the main focus of the game's setting to get dragged into battles/campaigns in a more believable fashion.

ashc
09-02-2010, 20:18
The problem with Lizardmen is that, in the game's lore, they don't get out and do anything. They rely on others to come to Lustria, which is rather passive and keeps them out of the action in the Old World. Tomb Kings and Wood Elves have a similar problem, but they're close enough to the main focus of the game's setting to get dragged into battles/campaigns in a more believable fashion.

This.

plus more characters to count as a post...

N810
09-02-2010, 20:20
Because nobody but Lizardmen players can bother to read their lore. :eyebrows:

Stegadeth
09-02-2010, 21:29
Give GW credit for actually succeeding in incorporating Meso-American lore into their fantasy. I'm not sure anyone else has actually done that.

D&D did.

As for Lizardmen "not belonging" to fantasy, well, that is absolute rubbish. Seeing as how Fantasy is grounded firmly in myth and such things as Lizardmen or at least monstrous and or scaly men have been described in such literature for, well, really as long as you can go back. Grendel was described (in the cases in which he was depicted more monster than man) as having horny and scaly protrusions from his arm.

Let us not also forget that the dragon, a staple of fantasy beyond repudiation, is nothing more than an overgrown lizard and in many cases is portrayed as not only intelligent but capable of thought and speech like a man. Is a race of bipedal Lizardmen really that far of a stretch? I would say no.

Condottiere
09-02-2010, 21:37
TSR did it first, but it always seemed a sort of a stepchild; never found it interesting.

Voss
09-02-2010, 21:41
D&D did.

D&D tried it briefly quite a ways back, then subsequently buried and ignored it, and finally destroyed it entirely with the revisions to the FR setting for 4th edition. I'm not really sure that counts.


As for Lizardmen "not belonging" to fantasy, well, that is absolute rubbish. Seeing as how Fantasy is grounded firmly in myth and such things as Lizardmen or at least monstrous and or scaly men have been described in such literature for, well, really as long as you can go back. Grendel was described (in the cases in which he was depicted more monster than man) as having horny and scaly protrusions from his arm.

Which isn't really the same as a lizard person, or a race of lizard persons. Grendel is described as an offshot of Lillith bedding down with monsters after she rejected Adam and Eden.



Let us not also forget that the dragon, a staple of fantasy beyond repudiation, is nothing more than an overgrown lizard and in many cases is portrayed as not only intelligent but capable of thought and speech like a man. Is a race of bipedal Lizardmen really that far of a stretch? I would say no.

Its not really a matter of it being a stretch. Its more a matter of springing something that isn't a well-established fantasy archetype (not just something from D&D). Its more a campy sci-fi thing, something you'd find in bad 70s sci-fi shows like Land of the Lost. Additionally it loses a lot of the older GW crowd because it was mutated from the original concept of Slaan as the remnants of the Old Ones fallen into barbarity, where the Slaan form the rank and file of the army, to today's lizard's on toy dinosaurs army with the occasional Slaan, as the oldest servants of the Old Ones.

Stegadeth
09-02-2010, 22:10
D&D tried it briefly quite a ways back, then subsequently buried and ignored it, and finally destroyed it entirely with the revisions to the FR setting for 4th edition. I'm not really sure that counts.
I was referring specifically to the First Edition AD&D Deities and Demigods in which the Mesoamerican Mythos was summarized in game terms along with several others like Newhon, Cthulu and even Arthurian myth. It wasn't buried at all as that book was written as a Dungeon Master aid to help quantify in game terms for the old-fashioned DM who didn't need to be spoon-fed his entire setting in a series of specific books like Forgotten Realms.




Which isn't really the same as a lizard person, or a race of lizard persons. Grendel is described as an offshot of Lillith bedding down with monsters after she rejected Adam and Eden.
I didn't say it was the same. It's in the ballpark though and that is in one of the oldest works of Fantasy we have. By the way, Grendel was a descendant of Cain, not part of the Lilith mythos. That is if you are referring to the Beowulf from the Nowell Codex, which I was.





Its not really a matter of it being a stretch. Its more a matter of springing something that isn't a well-established fantasy archetype (not just something from D&D). Its more a campy sci-fi thing, something you'd find in bad 70s sci-fi shows like Land of the Lost. Additionally it loses a lot of the older GW crowd because it was mutated from the original concept of Slaan as the remnants of the Old Ones fallen into barbarity, where the Slaan form the rank and file of the army, to today's lizard's on toy dinosaurs army with the occasional Slaan, as the oldest servants of the Old Ones.

All I have to say to this is a quote from Terry Brooks.

"People who view fantasy as second rate or childish are usually people who don't read or understand it."

I think I'd go so far as to say people who view Lizardmen as second rate or childish are usually people who don't play or understand them. Fantasy has and continues to evolve. Some people prefer dark fantasy and criticize Tolkien's High Fantasy as too childish. I happen to read all kinds of Fantasy and have no trouble accepting Lizardmen.

Perhaps it is because I grew up playing D&D and now after nearly thirty years of DMing under my belt I not only have grown up with Lizardmen, but have a mind agile enough to reconcile and accept their existence in a world of pure imagination. If forces of magic can warp people into beasts and cause mutations and goblins exist and stunties can make helicopters, Lizardmen are not out of place. In fact, they don't stretch my willing suspension of disbelief as much as some of those other things do!

Voss
09-02-2010, 22:21
I was referring specifically to the First Edition AD&D Deities and Demigods in which the Mesoamerican Mythos was summarized in game terms along with several others like Newhon, Cthulu and even Arthurian myth. It wasn't buried at all as that book was written as a Dungeon Master aid to help quantify in game terms for the old-fashioned DM who didn't need to be spoon-fed his entire setting in a series of specific books like Forgotten Realms.

I wouldn't really call that 'successfully integrating' it, since they did nothing with it. I'm sure a DM who didn't need his entire setting spoon-fed to him didn't need to have stats for his gods spoon-fed to him either.



I didn't say it was the same. It's in the ballpark though and that is in one of the oldest works of Fantasy we have. By the way, Grendel was a descendant of Cain, not part of the Lilith mythos. That is if you are referring to the Beowulf from the Nowell Codex, which I was.

Cain, right. Biblical figures tend to blur together a bit. Still not sure about that ballpark, though, except that its bloody big: when I think Grendel I think ogre archetype, not lizards in any way.


:angel:

Stegadeth
09-02-2010, 22:29
I wouldn't really call that 'successfully integrating' it, since they did nothing with it. I'm sure a DM who didn't need his entire setting spoon-fed to him didn't need to have stats for his gods spoon-fed to him either.




Cain, right. Biblical figures tend to blur together a bit. Still not sure about that ballpark, though, except that its bloody big: when I think Grendel I think ogre archetype, not lizards in any way.


:angel:

I suppose it depends on one's imagination then. Scaly skin means only one thing to me. I was always fascinated with snakes. Speaking of snakes, Naga are another fantastic example of reptile-men.

One thing I would make sure of in the future though, is to not refer to Lilith as a Biblical figure. There is only one possible occurrence of the name in the Bible at all, in fact, and that is in reference to Lilith as a Mesopotamian storm demon. The whole first wife of Adam folklore came at a later time and has no Biblical evidence.

silence
09-02-2010, 22:36
Because they are still considered a "new" army in some respects by some people? Could it be that because the Lizardmen where not there from the beginning (in there current guise) that gamers decided that they did not fit and have somehow passed that opinion onto newer gamers over the years?

Arjuna
10-02-2010, 04:44
Because playing around with frogs and salamanders is something best left for 8year olds ;)

There is an entire profession of herpetology filled with men and women with a fanatical devotion to the study of frogs, salamanders and other similar vertebrates that would burn you at the stake for this pronouncement! Among all zoologists this is the nerdiest group of all! Thus they have a special kinship to wargamers.

Arjuna
10-02-2010, 04:58
All I have to say to this is a quote from Terry Brooks.

"People who view fantasy as second rate or childish are usually people who don't read or understand it."


Quoting one of the most abysmal fantasy authors to spam derivative unimaginative prose in the history of the English language is probably not the best way to make a point.

Lustria was invented by Richard Halliwell and has been part of the warhammer fantasy battle mythos since at least the publication of the "Second Citadel Compendium". Off hand I dont know if this is the first significant printed Lustria WHFB material, but it is certainly old enough to warrant the claim that Lustria and its inhabitants belong in WHFB as much as any other fantasy elements.

outbreak
10-02-2010, 05:00
after seeing those original space slann models it got me thinkg, what year did they come out and what year did the game battle toads come out....

Stegadeth
10-02-2010, 05:28
Quoting one of the most abysmal fantasy authors to spam derivative unimaginative prose in the history of the English language is probably not the best way to make a point.

Lustria was invented by Richard Halliwell and has been part of the warhammer fantasy battle mythos since at least the publication of the "Second Citadel Compendium". Off hand I dont know if this is the first significant printed Lustria WHFB material, but it is certainly old enough to warrant the claim that Lustria and its inhabitants belong in WHFB as much as any other fantasy elements.

LOL, I just happen to like the quote, not his work. Speaking of derivative and unimaginative have you seen the fluff in the game we're playing? :cheese:

Condottiere
10-02-2010, 06:30
Yeah, but at least it's somewhat interactive, and with Terry Brooks, I only needed to force myself to finish one of his Shannara books to never want to do so again.

N810
10-02-2010, 12:20
Umm Battle Toads where clearly riping off Ninja Turtles.

Ps. The Regular Slan Warriors came before Space Slann.

The SkaerKrow
10-02-2010, 12:27
Because nobody but Lizardmen players can bother to read their lore. :eyebrows:Oh, it's certainly mentioned in the new book, but it's still very understated.

I still lament Lizardmen losing their foothold in Albion. Battling to hold the isle against the forces of Chaos (and rid it of Fimir? Hehe) while launching sorties into the Old World would make the Lizardmen a lot more active in the current events in Warhammer Fantasy.

Condottiere
10-02-2010, 13:43
The Lizardmen do seem to have a number of natural enemies, besides the usual bunch from Chaos. Pseudo-Conquistadors, Skaven and Dark elves.

Stegadeth
10-02-2010, 19:06
The Lizardmen do seem to have a number of natural enemies, besides the usual bunch from Chaos. Pseudo-Conquistadors, Skaven and Dark elves.

Elves to an extent in general based on history as well. And, if the Dwarfs ever found out what caused those mountains to come crashing down and ruin their civilisation, well, I can picture steam ships crossing the ocean loaded with slayers and some really pissed off rune lords.

Ultimate Life Form
10-02-2010, 19:13
Elves to an extent in general based on history as well. And, if the Dwarfs ever found out what caused those mountains to come crashing down and ruin their civilisation, well, I can picture steam ships crossing the ocean loaded with slayers and some really pissed off rune lords.

And then... we'll see them crushed. :p

That is, if they can cope with the jungle. Slow stunties = self-service bite-size Carnosaur snacks.

Necromancy Black
11-02-2010, 01:33
Plus they gotta get across the oceans which is patrolled constantly by the elves. And we now how much they love each other.
Someone was saying before that the problem with Lizardmen is that they aren't active enough in the rest of the world.

That's kinda the point.

The Slann follow the plan of the Old Ones and that requires all races being where they were meant to be and all other races whiped out. Mazdamundi is particularly active in doing this.
I can see a powerful Slann opening a gateway to where the Wood Elves are and bringing an army across to try and drive them away. Why? Because that's not where the Old Ones originally put them.

But even then, there is plenty of reason for the other races to invade Lustria for all the gold and magical items there. So there isn't any reason why the Lizardmen would not fight any of the other warhammer races, even outside of Lustria.

Plus it's cool to have what is almost a creator race hiding away from the rest of the world, providing unseen help to some of the most important things in the world (the battle against Archaon, the Vortex of the elves)