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baneful
12-02-2006, 08:35
G'day everyone,

Well as the tittle suggests im in need of advice. I am looking at introducing specialist games to my local gaming group.
I am an old hand at the hobby (mainly 40k/fantasy), and have a history with Necromunda in its previous incarnation (though i have'nt played in a good 7 years), access to tonnes of necromunda terrain and a couple of gangs. I also have the rules books for both Mordheim and Inquisitor and multiple warbands, though no experience in either system.

I am looking at introducing possibly Necromunda, Mordheim, or Inquisitor.
With what i have access too, i am considering mainly Mordheim or Necromunda, though i have no idea where to start.

Our group mainly follows 40k, and is now branching into fantasy. Lotr also has a following.

I have mentioned these options to my gaiming group, whom with the exception of a couple are newer generations then this game and i get questions like "whats a mordheim?", etc.
Although i do get positive interest at attempting one of these systems.

So i suppose the main things should be, is where do i start:
Should I endevour to print out a copies of the living rule books for both systems, and extra articals?
What is the new edition of necro like? easier for newer generations to grasp?
or would mordheim be easier to impliment?

As for demo games, should I run some when my experience is as rusty/rudimentry as it is now?

thanks everyone, any advice would be great. i just want these newer gamers to enjoy something which is sorely neglected these days by gw.

im sure ill have more questions to come later on aswell:angel:

TheHood
12-02-2006, 09:07
Probably the best thing to do would be to walk into the club with a mate, a rulebook, some terrain and painted miniatures, set up a table and just begin playing.

Other people will notice, wander over and take a look and hopefully like what they see and want to give it a go. Just use it as an opportunity to hand over the dice and some minis and let people have a go, with you there to help them out with any problems and queries that may arise.

Im sure once you start playing a few rounds, it'll all come flooding back :p And if the majority of the group are into 40K, it may pay to begin with Necromunda, seeing as that is what you are most familiar with.

You'll soon be the most popular guy in the building!!!

ReDavide
12-02-2006, 10:08
A couple years back, a guy in our (mainly 40k) gaming group introduced us to Mordheim.

It was a nice change from the monotony of playing 40k week after week. It also gave us a chance to toy around with some Fantasy models. The store's Fantasy rack was something many of us had never bought anything from, and playing Mordheim gave us a chance to explore armies that seemed interesting without having to make the huge commitment that starting Fantasy would require.

Maybe your gaming group has members like we had: mildly bored 40k players who were mildly interested in Fantasy, and needed a low-budget game to start out with.

I wouldn't bother printing out lots of rulebooks. Print one or two for people to browse at their leisure, but there's no need for everyone to have a take-home copy. Better to present it as a lightweight, fun diversion than as something with a big rulebook to memorize.

orangesm
12-02-2006, 18:15
I agree with theHood on this one. Just show them what it is all about. This is what will get people interested, seeing it played. I got my entire club playing Gothic by just showing them the rules, minis, and maybe a small game.

starlight
12-02-2006, 18:23
With the games that you are interested in, I'd compare it favourably to Kill Team or Combat Patrol. Squad (or so) based combat systems that play fast and fun with much greater potential for detail.

Agreed on the - just start playing, they'll come out of curiousity and stay for many reasons.:D

Sonofsigmar
13-02-2006, 03:32
Mordheim is the way to go. It is easier to learn, and easier to run a campaign and takes longer to get out of control. I would read through the rules yourself and then sit down and play a few games with everyone. Once they get the idea, go ahead and run a league.

As an aside, I am just starting out a mordheim campaign using 40k. It is a LatD campaign, and each player get 100 pts to spend on their warband. Any model that has access to wargear lists is a hero, and the rest are Henchman groups.

Currently my warband is
Aspiring champ, Bolt pistol, Powersword, frags - 39
Mutant Boss, CCW - 17
4 Mutants - 24
Spawn - 20

We use the mordheim scenarios and its system for generating income and just divide the income by ten. We use the 40k mechanics for the actual game itself, with the inclusion of stunned, knocked down etc. Like I am said we are just starting, so I am still working out the kinks.

SoS

Odin
13-02-2006, 18:45
Mordheim is the way to go. It is easier to learn, and easier to run a campaign and takes longer to get out of control. I would read through the rules yourself and then sit down and play a few games with everyone. Once they get the idea, go ahead and run a league.

As an aside, I am just starting out a mordheim campaign using 40k. It is a LatD campaign, and each player get 100 pts to spend on their warband. Any model that has access to wargear lists is a hero, and the rest are Henchman groups.

Currently my warband is
Aspiring champ, Bolt pistol, Powersword, frags - 39
Mutant Boss, CCW - 17
4 Mutants - 24
Spawn - 20

We use the mordheim scenarios and its system for generating income and just divide the income by ten. We use the 40k mechanics for the actual game itself, with the inclusion of stunned, knocked down etc. Like I am said we are just starting, so I am still working out the kinks.

SoS

? The Necromunda rules poo all over Mordheim - surely it's better to stick to that?

CobaltEarthgem
13-02-2006, 20:36
Mordheim is a great starter game for Fantasy.

Try the game with a mate approach, make sure your terrain is good looking, fudge the games a bit (set this up with you mate ahead of time) so you do a lot of building climbing and fighting over wyrdstone tokens. Human Mercenaries vs. Skaven; Undead vs. Witch Hunters and Cult of the Possessed vs. Sisters of Sigmar make good looking demos.

Chem-Dog
14-02-2006, 02:42
I'm speaking mainly from a Necromunda viewpoint here, but I'd advise arranging two gangs and giving each member control over a single Ganger (with yourself and one other experience player as leaders), then fight a basic Gang fight, two gangs of individuals fighting it out, you can do it straight out of the book as starter gangs and then see it through the post game sequence, Much of the joy of Necromunda is it's campaign mode and more people will be interested if they see that aspect of it, especially if you split earnings from each gang between the players, so they can give their guy an extra gun or something. Make it all the more fun by including a handful of loot counters.

generulpoleaxe
14-02-2006, 08:41
try running it as a tabletop roleplay session.
you controling the bad guys and encounter situations, giving descriptions about the terrain features they see and things they hear.
your friend taking control of the warband/adventureres and helping out anyone who wishes to join in.
this will give them more of a story feeling and it slowly builds up the atmosphere whilst they learn the rules during the game.

it also stops it degenerating into two warbands just beating the snot out of each other every game.
think of it as warhammer roleplay as a wargame and it becomes much more fun.

Cherubael
21-02-2006, 12:59
If you were considering introducing Inquisitor, i would also suggest reducing the scale down to 28mm, same scale as 40k and allowing players to use models from their armies as characters.

With the vagueness in terms of measuring scale in Inquisitor it wont pose a problem, and given the rulebook is available for free on the Specialist games website, you can have a trial run of the game without anyone having to go to the expense of buying Inquisitor models or spending hours making scenery suitable for the increased scale.

precinctomega
24-02-2006, 12:55
If you were considering introducing Inquisitor, i would also suggest reducing the scale down to 28mm

There are many problems associated with Inq28, as it's known, although it has been shown to be an excellent way to introduce new players to the rules. I recommend follwing the link in my sig and looking at the FAQs at WWB, where you'll find some thoughts on Inq28 that have proved helpful for others wanting to start playing INQ at their clubs.

R.