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Deff Mekz
01-04-2010, 14:11
I wasn't sure were to put this so I put here. I was just wojndering how people pronounced Baal.

I personally pronounce it, Ball. Like Ball Predator.

However I've heard others calling it Bale, like the Chaos Lord form DOW1, and also Bal.

Does anyone know the correction pronunciation. Cheers, Deff.

Godzooky
01-04-2010, 14:13
I've always pronounced it BARL.

Born Again
01-04-2010, 14:15
The Grammar nuts can double check this for me but I believe the double a makes it a long, extended sound, so either "Bale", or "Barl". I've always gone with the latter.

Ninja'd!

Thanatos_elNyx
01-04-2010, 14:15
Ball like the Diablo Boss.
But I have heard it pronounce Bale.

AFnord
01-04-2010, 14:16
I pronounce it like ball, but with a drawn out a.

Deff Mekz
01-04-2010, 14:18
Wow! So many quick replies, Cheers guys.

Godzooky
01-04-2010, 14:18
You could just try saying BALL in the way Trey Parker would say it. That would see you right. :)

PxDn Ninja
01-04-2010, 14:23
It's been a while sense I studied grammar, but I'm 99% certain it is pronounced with the long a, thus Bale.

moose
01-04-2010, 14:28
I pronounce it BARL, never would have imagined people saying bale but maybe its a locality thing.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/baal

Per the dictionary (press the speaker icon);
BARL for - australian slang for 'no'.
BALE for - a false god.


Moose.

therat
01-04-2010, 14:29
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/baal

Depends on how you use it :D

Second entry is what it should be, the first one is slang.

So, like bale.

edit: a rat ninja'd by a moose, embarassing

dragonet111
01-04-2010, 14:41
I always thought it was from the god Ba'al So I pronouce it Ba al. But english is not my mother tong so it's just how I pronounce it.

Thanatos_elNyx
01-04-2010, 14:45
I really don't understand how anyone can pronounce it with an 'R'!?

bluenova
01-04-2010, 14:49
It's been a while sense I studied grammar, but I'm 99% certain it is pronounced with the long a, thus Bale.

That's how I see it too - but I always took the 'a' pronounced ah, rather than ae, to give bahl, or barl. That's just the way I read it the first time I saw it - maybe it's because I like the Indian dish Tarka Daal (also spelt Dahl or sometimes just Dal).

The Daal Predator, that's me :D

Godzooky
01-04-2010, 14:50
I really don't understand how anyone can pronounce it with an 'R'!?

So all you BALE supporters think sheep stand in fields going, "BAY, BAY"? :shifty:

It's BARL, or I'll eat my hat.

AndrewGPaul
01-04-2010, 15:15
"Bahl". I suppose to some people, that's the same as "Barl", but not if you roll your "r"s.

Think of the first syllable of the word "balance". Now hold the "ah" sound for a bit longer. That's it. Somewhere between "Bal" and "Barl".

Godzooky
01-04-2010, 15:17
"Bahl". I suppose to some people, that's the same as "Barl", but not if you roll your "r"s.

Think of the first syllable of the word "balance". Now hold the "ah" sound for a bit longer. That's it. Somewhere between "Bal" and "Barl".

That's a good point. I don't roll my "R"s. Not since the accident. :cries:

Bahl.

Wicksy
01-04-2010, 15:34
I always took it as Bale.

This is the blurb off some (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/baal) dictionary site:

Main Entry: baal
Pronunciation: \ˈbā(-ə)l, ˈbäl\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural baals or baa·lim \ˈbā-(ə-)ləm, ˈbā-ə-ˌlim\
Usage: often capitalized
Etymology: Hebrew baʽal lord
Date: 14th century

: any of numerous Canaanite and Phoenician local deities

— baal·ism \ˈbā-(ə-)ˌli-zəm\ noun often capitalized

Dunno what the pronounciation means though.

Thanatos_elNyx
01-04-2010, 15:36
So all you BALE supporters think sheep stand in fields going, "BAY, BAY"? :shifty:

It's BARL, or I'll eat my hat.

Sheep say "Baa", though Pigs do NOT say "Oink".

Even if it is American: http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/audio.pl?baal0001=baal

Wicksy
01-04-2010, 15:36
So all you BALE supporters think sheep stand in fields going, "BAY, BAY"? :shifty:

It's BARL, or I'll eat my hat.

Um, i dont know what you think sheep sound like....... :confused:

Godzooky
01-04-2010, 15:39
Um, i dont know what you think sheep sound like....... :confused:

If I'm wrong that they go, "BAAAA" rather than "BAAAY", please forgive my ignorance.

Perhaps you've spent more time in their company than I have. ;)

Wicksy
01-04-2010, 15:42
If I'm wrong that they go, "BAAAA" rather than "BAAAY", please forgive my ignorance.

Perhaps you've spent more time in their company than I have. ;)

I'm English, not Welsh...the only time i spend with sheep is when i cook and eat them :D

Pronounciation is difficult unless you understand those symbols in the dictionaaries. Thats the hard cannon.

Thud
01-04-2010, 15:42
Main Entry: baal
Pronunciation: \ˈbā(-ə)l, ˈbäl\

Dunno what the pronounciation means though.

It means you either pronounce it like "ba-eyl" or like "bayl" (respectively).

Edit: the y, in the first option, is very weak; to the point where maybe an h would be better suited to explain the correct pronunciation to someone who can't read IPA.

Corrode
01-04-2010, 15:42
I always took it as Bale.

This is the blurb off some (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/baal) dictionary site:

Main Entry: baal
Pronunciation: \ˈbā(-ə)l, ˈbäl\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural baals or baa·lim \ˈbā-(ə-)ləm, ˈbā-ə-ˌlim\
Usage: often capitalized
Etymology: Hebrew baʽal lord
Date: 14th century

: any of numerous Canaanite and Phoenician local deities

— baal·ism \ˈbā-(ə-)ˌli-zəm\ noun often capitalized

Dunno what the pronounciation means though.

It means it's Bahl, not Bale. The third entry on Dictionary.com (which the poster above apparently missed) says the same thing. In English I would go with Bahl purely by assocation (bazaar).

Wicksy
01-04-2010, 15:45
It means it's Bahl, not Bale. The third entry on Dictionary.com (which the poster above apparently missed) says the same thing. In English I would go with Bahl purely by assocation (bazaar).

Listen to the audio pronounciation from Dictionary.com ;)

therat
01-04-2010, 15:47
If I'm wrong that they go, "BAAAA" rather than "BAAAY", please forgive my ignorance.

Perhaps you've spent more time in their company than I have. ;)

I think the confusion came from you asking if sheep say BAY, but then saying it's pronounced BARL, leading people to believe that sheep say BAAR.

I feel onomatopoeia is a bad comparisson. The extra 'a' in a sheep's baa represents the fact that the sheep holds the sound, instead of just going "ba."

The diety Baal is pronounced bay-ul, or most similarly to bale.

Godzooky
01-04-2010, 15:58
I think the confusion came from you asking if sheep say BAY, but then saying it's pronounced BARL, leading people to believe that sheep say BAAR.

I feel onomatopoeia is a bad comparisson. The extra 'a' in a sheep's baa represents the fact that the sheep holds the sound, instead of just going "ba."

The diety Baal is pronounced bay-ul, or most similarly to bale.

Yep, I could have been more clear that I don't pronounce the R. I've made a total "R"s of myself. :)

ago syb
01-04-2010, 16:00
I used to pronounce it "Ball" but since I've played Diablo 2 and they pronounce it "Bale" with the same spelling (Baal). It makes sense with the trend in BA naming, Mephisto, Baal, Dante, the Lucifer Armored Strike Force is the nail in the coffin on any argument otherwise, if you ask me, :P

Hunger
01-04-2010, 16:08
It is pronounced BAHL, rhyming with Carl, snarl, or (indeed) Tarka Daal.

There's no doubt about it - its an appropriation by GW of one of the pagan gods of Hell, here's the reference for all the naysayers:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/baal

Corrode
01-04-2010, 16:20
Listen to the audio pronounciation from Dictionary.com ;)

Scroll down to the third reference which uses the pronunciation I mentioned ;)

Bathawk
01-04-2010, 16:20
I always took it as Bale.

This is the blurb off some (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/baal) dictionary site:

Main Entry: baal
Pronunciation: \ˈbā(-ə)l, ˈbäl\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural baals or baa·lim \ˈbā-(ə-)ləm, ˈbā-ə-ˌlim\
Usage: often capitalized
Etymology: Hebrew baʽal lord
Date: 14th century

: any of numerous Canaanite and Phoenician local deities

— baal·ism \ˈbā-(ə-)ˌli-zəm\ noun often capitalized

Dunno what the pronounciation means though.


Aren't most of the Imperial worlds named after mythological deities,creatures,places?. So it makes sense that Baal is meant to be Ba'al

so it's Baal..as in Bacchi (to quote a great military leader)

Latro_
01-04-2010, 16:22
We all say it like:

B'al'

Abbaddon is another good one, We all say ABBAdon when really i think it should be ABADon

Thud
01-04-2010, 16:32
Abbaddon is another good one, We all say ABBAdon when really i think it should be ABADon

Do you think the 14th crusade will prove to be his Waterloo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTQwZ7mULGU&feature=fvst)?

:p

spetswalshe
01-04-2010, 16:34
The Baldur's Gate game series told me it was 'baah-l' and I trust them implicitly.

Warmaster_John
01-04-2010, 16:41
Based on an online dictionary and an audio pronunciation (googled baal pronunciation), it appears to be BAY-UL, but runs together to sound much like BALE (as in a hay bale). Personally, I've always pronounced it BAY-ALL, as it sounds a bit cooler to me.

Ozendorph
01-04-2010, 16:50
My pal knew a gal from Baal.

See just like that. :)

TheDilz
01-04-2010, 16:55
Its pronounced:

"my BAALs, your mouth."

Zing!

Hunger
01-04-2010, 16:56
Hehe, Ozendorph, use the version I suggested and you'll sound rather like a very posh Englishman.

PxDn Ninja
01-04-2010, 17:02
So all you BALE supporters think sheep stand in fields going, "BAY, BAY"? :shifty:

It's BARL, or I'll eat my hat.

Baa, as a sheep might say, is an onomatopoeia, and is more phonetic than grammatical in it's pronunciation. Baa is simply the word we use in place of the sound a sheep makes. (Consider a dog, who we say will go woof, bark, ruff, or any other descriptor of its sound).

Thus I stand by it is Bale.

Ozendorph
01-04-2010, 17:06
Hehe, Ozendorph, use the version I suggested and you'll sound rather like a very posh Englishman.

Well, it is a lifelong dream to sound both posh and English, but I can't figure out for the life of me why you crazy gits keep sticking an 'r' in there. It'd be like if I threw in a 'p' for the heck of it, and pronounced it BAPL. Which, coincidentally, would make for a great name for a banana-apple puree.

BigbyWolf
01-04-2010, 17:11
Another vote for BARL/BAHL here...

Arbaal the Undefeated would agree with me.

sliganian
01-04-2010, 17:26
In Quebec it would be pronnounced "Thibodeau". ;)

Earthbeard
01-04-2010, 17:38
I always pronounce it BARL, but if it's based on the demon Baal/Bael it should be BALE.

rellen22
01-04-2010, 18:34
how about ba-ahl with 2 'a' sounds

massey
01-04-2010, 19:00
how about ba-ahl with 2 'a' sounds

Yeah, sign me up for that one. Crow T Robot agrees with me (hear his pronunciation in Manos: The Hands of Fate).

I have no idea where people are getting an "r" sound.

Orcboy_Phil
01-04-2010, 19:09
Barl

Also sheep make a more Meeerh sound rather than Baa.

Saucey
01-04-2010, 19:12
Bale here, like a hay bale. I'm also not understanding how the R plays into it at all.

Logarithm Udgaur
01-04-2010, 19:20
I always thought it was from the god Ba'al So I pronouce it Ba al. But english is not my mother tong so it's just how I pronounce it.

^This. +1

DDogwood
01-04-2010, 20:36
Another vote here for "bale" - you folks who make it rhyme with "ball" are mistaken. Those of you who make it rhyme with "Carl" or "snarl" are just phonetically challenged.

Note that it's not an English word, originally, but a Hebrew one.

Scryer in the Darkness
01-04-2010, 21:03
Another vote here for "bale" - you folks who make it rhyme with "ball" are mistaken. Those of you who make it rhyme with "Carl" or "snarl" are just phonetically challenged.

No, they are phonetically correct in fact. Double "a" in English denotes a drawn out "ar" sound (actually more somewhere between the sound of "mar" and "mal"). However, if GW's Baal is based on the Hebrew Ba'al then it is logical, though not strictly requisite, to apply the Hebrew prounciation. This is of course "Ba'al" with an apostrophe, so at which stage how to pronounce "Baal" becomes purely academic.

kardar233
01-04-2010, 21:18
I learned Hebrew from a young age and so pronounce it "Ba-al", as in the Canaanite god. I cringe when people talk about 40K and Diablo and pronounce it "Bale", or especially "Ball".

It's painful.

Dr Cuddles
01-04-2010, 23:45
100% of the people I play with pronounce it Bale. Rhymes with hail and fail. None of this wacky Ball or Barl(wtf?)

Grimbad
02-04-2010, 00:02
I pronounce it "ixyq".


[no, really, "ball"]

Vomikron Noxis
02-04-2010, 00:09
The Baldur's Gate game series told me it was 'baah-l' and I trust them implicitly.

Agreed. That game can do no wrong.

The God of Decay
02-04-2010, 00:13
Idk, I pronounce it like this

Pronounce Bad, then replace the d with LL, Ba-ll, i know it sounds like bowel, but, eh?

Hoarmurel
02-04-2010, 00:22
I always thought it was from the god Ba'al So I pronouce it Ba al. But english is not my mother tong so it's just how I pronounce it.

I agree with this. Also, english is not my mother tongue. :)

Tourniquet
02-04-2010, 00:29
i always pronounce the long a

so it sounds like 'bahl'

Egaeus
02-04-2010, 00:30
Put another check in the "Bale" column for me.

Oh goody, an opportunity to link to one of my favorite poems about the English language:

http://www.frivolity.com/teatime/Songs_and_Poems/english_is_tough_stuff.html

New Cult King
02-04-2010, 00:32
Bayel. Though I suppose it's much the same as Bale.


I smell troll.

Your nose must be too close to your armpits then ;)

From Wikipedia: Ba'al is a Northwest Semitic title and honorific meaning "master" or "lord" that is used for various gods who were patrons of cities in the Levant, cognate to Akkadian Bēlu. A Baalist or Baalite means a worshipper of Baal.

"Ba‛al" can refer to any god and even to human officials; in some texts it is used as a substitute for Hadad, a god of the rain, thunder, fertility and agriculture, and the lord of Heaven. Since only priests were allowed to utter his divine name, Hadad, Ba‛al was commonly used. Nevertheless, few if any Biblical uses of "Ba‛al" refer to Hadad, the lord over the assembly of gods on the holy mount of Heaven, but rather refer to any number of local spirit-deities worshipped as cult images, each called ba‛al and regarded in the Hebrew Bible in that context as a false god.

massey
02-04-2010, 00:40
This is actually completely incorrect, and I'm sure Hitler would agree with me (Hitler was a smart man). Think of the word "aardvark". Hebrew is about as related to this topic as Swahili; you don't see anyone saying how they would pronounce Baal is Swahili in this topic, so why mention Hebrew? I smell troll.

He mentions Hebrew because Ba'al is a Semitic word.

chromedog
02-04-2010, 00:55
In many languages, the apostraphe indicates a 'glottal stop' .
An old gaming mate's Hebrew name was Ze'ev (it means 'Wolf'). This was not pronounced "Zeev", but rather two separate syllables with a slight pause between them.

Thus, something like Ba'al would be similar. 'Ba' and 'al'. 'Bale' is just wrong (unless you are using the later spelling of Bael) but then NO-ONE pronounces English right since the great vowel shift.

Abaddon is closer to AVA-don, anyway.

Ironmonger
02-04-2010, 01:00
In many languages, the apostraphe indicates a 'glottal stop' .
An old gaming mate's Hebrew name was Ze'ev. This was not pronounced "Zeev", but rather two separate syllables with a slight pause between them.

Thus, something like Ba'al would be similar. 'Ba' and 'al'. 'Bale' is just wrong (unless you are using the later spelling of Bael) but then NO-ONE pronounces English right since the great vowel shift.

Abaddon is closer to AVA-don, anyway.

2nd with no argument. I know an Israeli who says 'Bah-all' fast.

tacoo
02-04-2010, 01:02
I just pronounce it as how you would saw "Bawl"

Melchiah
02-04-2010, 01:21
I always said it with a "hard" A sound like Bah and al as in Allen/Al, i say it like "Bah-al."
Im sure someone will say im wrong, but thats how i say it.:p

carlisimo
02-04-2010, 03:46
There must be a lot of Brits (or Bostoners) here because “Barl” sounds bizarre to a Californian.

I say “ball” with a slightly prolonged “a”, but “baw’ALL” sounds okay to me too.

Wintersdark
02-04-2010, 03:54
Yeah, I'm really not seeing the "barl" variant. Seriously, R?

A Barl Predator? Yeah... no.

My money is on a long A sound, as it's lacking the apostrophe which would be more "ba-al" or "bah-el" or what have you. "Bale" is possible, but unlikely in my opinion. Given other naming that happens, I'd have to say if in doubt going with a two-syllable pronunciation is actually more likely to be correct than not.

GrimZAG
02-04-2010, 03:59
Barl for sures.

Tourniquet
02-04-2010, 04:07
BG/BG2

Baah-l

djinn8
02-04-2010, 04:45
Pretty easy for me to say being that I'm from Yorkshire.

"By'ek he got some baals"

Balerion
02-04-2010, 05:35
I say Ba-ahl, which I feel is roughly correct.


Yeah, I'm really not seeing the "barl" variant. Seriously, R?

A Barl Predator? Yeah... no.

Pronunciation threads quickly get confusing on this board because of the international diversity of members and the difference between North American and British accents.

I'm quite certain that everybody in the "barl" camp is a Brit.

To use that one guy's example of Baal rhyming with "Carl"... well, a North American would pronounce Carl something like car-ull, whereas a Briton's pronunciation of the same word would sound to us like cah-ull or call / caul.

Basically, whenever you see somebody throwing unexpected R's around on Warseer, just imagine them speaking in Blackadder's voice. ;)

Wintersdark
02-04-2010, 05:43
Ahhhh, I see. That makes a lot more sense.

"Bah-ull" works a lot better :)

For a north american, the R is in no way silent, and "bar-ull" is just bizzare and silly :)

massey
02-04-2010, 05:54
Who is Blackadder? :confused:

Arbiter7
02-04-2010, 06:13
BAAHL. Period.

ehlijen
02-04-2010, 06:13
It's pronounced exactly how it is written...assuming german pronunciation rules (which are suprisingly actually clear in this particular case) :p

Being german, I therefore say B - long A (as in the A-rbiter)-L

Alternatively, go watch the later seasons of Stargate SG1, Baal's probably in whichever one you pick.

velkore1134
02-04-2010, 06:44
Ball like the Diablo Boss.
But I have heard it pronounce Bale.

It's actually Bale, watch the LOD expansion cinematic, the priest calls him Bale

Logarithm Udgaur
02-04-2010, 07:13
Who is Blackadder? :confused:

Heretic! You are sentenced to watch all of Blackadder for your crimes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBVKerBWheI&feature=PlayList&p=DF2147034DFAB420&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

dreamwarder
02-04-2010, 07:38
As others have pointed out, the inspiration for the name is most likely to come from the Caananite deity of the same name mentioned frequently in the old testament of the Bible (or the Torah if you're Jewish).

Trouble is, those who originally pronounced the name have been dead for thousands of years, and while we can make 'best guesses' based on what we know of their language and similar still-living languages, the 'true' pronounciation is lost to time.

As this thread will no doubt prove, everyone can justsify their own favoured pronounciation in all sorts of ways, but really it just comes down to personal preference guided by cultural-linguistic norms.

Brits and NE coast Americans are more likely to say "Barl" and most yanks are more likely to say "Bale", with perhaps a few "Bawl"s for those who've played Baldur's Gate (Throne of...). Nederlanders and Germans are most likely to say a variant of "Bahl", with most other northern-europeans having a variant of somewhere between "Barl" and "Bahl".

It all comes down to how we naturally seek to pronounce written letters given our accent/dialect and language norms. Given that GW tend to "appropriate" perfectly good nouns and make them semi-proprietary (the idiocy that is "Dwarfs" being the best example) - it's anyone's guess as to what the "official" pronounciation is, or even what constitutes an "official" pronounciation, but given that GW is a British company, most of the design studio are more likely to say "Barl".

Personally I intend to stick with "Barl" as, being a Brit, it makes most sense to me. I'd encourage you to do whatever makes most sense to you and get really really unreasonably irritated with anyone who chooses to do it differently. Life's just more interesting that way.

And by the way, it's 'Laz' not 'Lays' :D

RCgothic
02-04-2010, 08:05
I learned my pronunciation from Stargate. The System Lord Baal pronounced Bahl.

Raven1
02-04-2010, 08:19
If it is based off the the demi-god/demon thing from the old/testament or Torah, then it should be Ba'al, as in two syllables. However, in other dictionaries I have seen it pronounced bahl (ball) and beyl (hay bale). This barl crap is confusing the heck out of me, but I suppose any one of the three above could be correct.

EldritchRaider
02-04-2010, 08:28
it can only really be BARL or BAIL can't it?? Depending on accent i suppose... But still, I've always gone with barl but I suppose Bail could be right.

RCgothic
02-04-2010, 08:42
If it is based off the the demi-god/demon thing from the old/testament or Torah, then it should be Ba'al, as in two syllables. However, in other dictionaries I have seen it pronounced bahl (ball) and beyl (hay bale). This barl crap is confusing the heck out of me, but I suppose any one of the three above could be correct.

Barl and bahl are probably too close to matter.

massey
02-04-2010, 13:07
Heretic! You are sentenced to watch all of Blackadder for your crimes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBVKerBWheI&feature=PlayList&p=DF2147034DFAB420&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

Ugh!!! Rowan Atkinson! :wtf:

I still have no idea where these magical "r"s are coming from. As a southern boy, I must say that while I think "Bah - ahl" is probably the most appropriate pronunciation, I'm more likely to pronounce it "baaawwl".

Raellos
02-04-2010, 14:22
It's been explained quite a few times, most southern English accents, Australian, New Zealand, some US accents, etc; have lost the 'r' in the middle or end of words.

Car becomes cah or caa,
rear becomes reah,
Carl becomes cahl or cull; etc.

Also, this Bale business isn't the result of accent is it? Is it actually just bale as in hay bale? That sounds daft to me. The same goes for ball.

Without the apostrophe I pronounce Baal as Bahl.

Corrode
02-04-2010, 15:00
Ugh!!! Rowan Atkinson! :wtf:

I still have no idea where these magical "r"s are coming from. As a southern boy, I must say that while I think "Bah - ahl" is probably the most appropriate pronunciation, I'm more likely to pronounce it "baaawwl".

The concept is called rhoticity - essentially, whether or not one pronounces the 'r' at the end of syllables. Very few British dialects are rhotic (I think Yorkshire and Wales are the exceptions), so to most people car, tar, ah, spa, shah all rhyme, and the long a sound 'aa' (like the sheep) is often spelt 'ar.' The majority of American dialects (I believe Boston is an exception) are rhotic, which essentially means that they pronounce those 'r's that most British people would ignore - so car is 'caruh' rather than 'caa', for example (think California, how anything with an 'r' kinda goes up at the end). To most Americans, an 'ar' in Baal would sound silly because it'd be pronounced like a truncated 'barrel' (which I think is what you're having trouble with), but most British speakers aren't aware of that.

e: Raellos, 'bale' is a Hebrew thing. Blame the Jews.

muggins
02-04-2010, 15:11
It is bale as has been linked quite a few times. Most warhams are terribly illiterate so it really annoys me to hear it said as "ball". That and Abaddon. If you read it correctly (sound it out!) it is Uh-badd-un, not ABBA-don. Aba doesn't make the ABBA sound, ADDON does not make the uh-don sound.

Corrode
02-04-2010, 15:25
It is bale as has been linked quite a few times. Most warhams are terribly illiterate so it really annoys me to hear it said as "ball". That and Abaddon. If you read it correctly (sound it out!) it is Uh-badd-un, not ABBA-don. Aba doesn't make the ABBA sound, ADDON does not make the uh-don sound.

Yeah, those same links had the alternate pronunciation on the same page if people bothered to scroll past Dictionary.com's adverts. Nice try though!

Scryer in the Darkness
02-04-2010, 15:30
To use that one guy's example of Baal rhyming with "Carl"... well, a North American would pronounce Carl something like car-ull, whereas a Briton's pronunciation of the same word would sound to us like cah-ull or call / caul.
In short, Americans (and some Canadians, eh) already have an "ar" sound built into their "ah" pronunciations. Americans and what they do to their vowels.... I never. :rolleyes::D


This barl crap is confusing the heck out of me
That's because you're an American. And no, I'm not having a jab at your intelligence, but the point above that you already have an "ar" sound in your "ah"s. ;)


I still have no idea where these magical "r"s are coming from.
See above.


The majority of American dialects (I believe Boston is an exception)

God bless Barston! :D To Australians, the Boston accent is like music to our ears. Everything the American accent should be! :p


but most British speakers aren't aware of that.
Oh, we are... and it's maddening. :p

muggins
02-04-2010, 15:32
Yeah, those same links had the alternate pronunciation on the same page if people bothered to scroll past Dictionary.com's adverts. Nice try though!
If you look at almost any page about 'pronouncing Baal' you'll see it is either the only way or the first way to pronounce the word. Bale, or Bay-ul.

edit: I too was confused as hell to read that people pronounce it Barl, but I realize it was mostly foreigners

Corrode
02-04-2010, 15:38
If you look at almost any page about 'pronouncing Baal' you'll see it is either the only way or the first way to pronounce the word. Bale, or Bay-ul.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081007072712AAWV78H
http://dictionary.reference.com/cite.html?qh=baal&ia=ahd4 (on the same page it also has 'bale'; the order they're in has nothing to do with correctness and everything to do with which dictionary they're from since dictionary.com collates from several different sources)
http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/baal
http://www.forvo.com/word/baal/
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Uk/uk.religion.christian/2006-05/msg00302.html

Those are among the very first results on a Google search for 'pronouncing Baal'. Again, nice try but no cigar.


edit: I too was confused as hell to read that people pronounce it Barl, but I realize it was mostly foreigners

Those crazy Brits and their foreign-sounding pronunciations of the American language!

Scryer in the Darkness
02-04-2010, 15:42
Those crazy Brits and their foreign-sounding pronunciations of the American language!
How dare they pronounce their vowels as if they don't have a mouth full of aerosol cheese! :D

loveless
02-04-2010, 15:57
I have to admit, learning the pronunciation of various letter combinations in foreign languages (and yes, I count all versions of non-American English as foreign languages :p) is obnoxious. Not French obnoxious, but still odd.

What's the difference between "ah" and "ar" in the Queen's English? Is there one?

Anyway, on topic a bit more:
I've heard both "Bahl" (maybe "Barl" to some of you...) and "Bayl" depending on the source. I should go ask someone that knows Hebrew how they'd say it, since I seem to remember Baal being in the Lesser Key. I don't recall, though.

I was going to reference Anima: Tactics, but then realized the character there is "Bael" instead of "Baal" and so wouldn't count :p

Spiney Norman
02-04-2010, 17:09
I always thought it was from the god Ba'al So I pronouce it Ba al. But english is not my mother tong so it's just how I pronounce it.

Assuming it comes from the name of the ancient Canaanite deity, the correct Aramaic/Hebrew pronounciation would be Bah-ahl, as the above poster indicated. Essentially two syllables, a "B" followed by a long a class vowel, and a second long a class vowel followed by a letter "L", with the syllables separated by a glottal stop.

To English folks the easiest way to think of it would be Bar-arl, since most of us English don't pronounce our letter r's anyway unless they begin a word. The problem with writing ba'al, while technically correct, is that some colloquial accents will tend to pronounce "al" as "ale", which is definitely incorrect.

However, since there are no glottal stops in the English language, the gap between the two syllables would normally not be emphasised in English pronunciation, so "bahl" (NOT "bale" ) would also be an acceptable anglicised pronunciation.

BobtheInquisitor
02-04-2010, 18:19
I always thought it was from the god Ba'al So I pronouce it Ba al. But english is not my mother tong so it's just how I pronounce it.

Both the god Ba'al and Beelzebub (or "Be'elzevuv") come from a Hebrew word for lord. "Bah all" is probably correct, since there is a separate transliteration ba'el (or "be'el") or "bale".

Of course, we could take a tip from Stargate SG1 and just call him "Ball". But then, Jack O'neill can't pronounce "Goa'uld" right, either, so what does he know?

Monachus
02-04-2010, 18:34
many years back this was mentioned in white dwarf,
it was pronounced bah-l

massey
02-04-2010, 18:36
In short, Americans (and some Canadians, eh) already have an "ar" sound built into their "ah" pronunciations. Americans and what they do to their vowels.... I never. :rolleyes::D


That's because you're an American. And no, I'm not having a jab at your intelligence, but the point above that you already have an "ar" sound in your "ah"s. ;)


See above.


God bless Barston! :D To Australians, the Boston accent is like music to our ears. Everything the American accent should be! :p


You apparently haven't heard a real "ar" sound. :) Let me find you some Jeff Foxworthy...

Coasty
02-04-2010, 18:41
I remember playing Diablo II and wanting to strangle the narrator for saying 'Bale' all the time, or else beat him to death with an archeaologist. It made it sound like the Big Bad was a scarecrow.

It is quite clearly pronunced as it is spelled. Baal, with a double 'a'. Like Saab, or like Ma'at, but with a less noticable glottal stop.

alders
02-04-2010, 18:41
i pronounce it barl

Coasty
02-04-2010, 18:46
As a Scotsman, I can tell you that would sound very funny. A bit like 'burl', meaning to roll or tumble quickly and noisily.

Come to think of it, 'barl' here would be almost indistinguishable from 'barrel' to the untrained ear.

Amida
02-04-2010, 19:04
Interesting thread! I thought it might be something to do with the deity Ba'al, making the ah sound longer? Kind of Ba-ah-al

edit - I see someone has beat to it, kudos sir!

LonelyPath
02-04-2010, 19:36
I've always pronounced it Bahl, same as the God Ba'al's name is spoken.

carlisimo
02-04-2010, 19:45
Also, this Bale business isn't the result of accent is it? Is it actually just bale as in hay bale? That sounds daft to me. The same goes for ball.

Without the apostrophe I pronounce Baal as Bahl.

I agree on "bale" sounding odd. But to us West Coast Americans, ball, bawl, bahl, and barl with a British accent all sound the same.

"Ball" must sound different in British English for you to make that comment. Maybe you guys pronounce the vowel more like a Spanish "o" than we do?

Wyrmwood
02-04-2010, 19:50
British English

I'm going to take a very, very long walk into a very, very deep lake...

Joking aside, I understand your point; though I've always pronounced 'Baal' as 'B-ahl', not 'Barl' or 'Bahrl'.

Also, there is not a 'British' accent - Irish, Welsh, Scottish, English - different regional dialects such as northern, southern (London, 'standard') and west country. I'd assume you'd be referring to 'Standard' English but even then, each accent pronounces each of those words you wrote in different and clearly distinguishable ways. Granted, Standard pronounciation of Ball is almost identical to saying 'bawl', but not 'bahl' and 'barl'.

LonelyPath
02-04-2010, 19:59
Also, there is not a 'British' accent - Irish, Welsh, Scottish, English - different regional dialects such as northern, southern (London, 'standard') and west country. I'd assume you'd be referring to 'Standard' English but even then, each accent pronounces each of those words you wrote in different and clearly distinguishable ways. Granted, Standard pronounciation of Ball is almost identical to saying 'bawl', but not 'bahl' and 'barl'.

I beg to differ, where I live the standard accent (which I also have) is something of a generalised British accent. Whilst it is in Wales, it is not Welsh, neither is in English, Irish nor Scotish, neither for that matter can it be traced to any of the many regional accents. I have to admit though, the accent is something of a oddity, lol :D

Wyrmwood
02-04-2010, 20:00
I beg to differ, where I live the standard accent (which I also have) is something of a generalised British accent. Whilst it is in Wales, it is not Welsh, neither is in English, Irish nor Scotish, neither for that matter can it be traced to any of the many regional accents. I have to admit though, the accent is something of a oddity, lol :D

I think you are just an abomination, LonelyPath! :p
... How far into Wales do you live? I would expect it close to the English border but not too deep into Wales, though I may be wrong. Personally, I've only had experience with a somewhat mixture of accents near to or around borders, but never deep very deep into the country.

Balerion
02-04-2010, 20:12
Also, there is not a 'British' accent - Irish, Welsh, Scottish, English - different regional dialects such as northern, southern (London, 'standard') and west country. I'd assume you'd be referring to 'Standard' English but even then, each accent pronounces each of those words you wrote in different and clearly distinguishable ways. Granted, Standard pronounciation of Ball is almost identical to saying 'bawl', but not 'bahl' and 'barl'.
Neither is there a 'North American' accent. If you grab one person each from Boston/Dallas/New York/Milwaukee/Baton Rouge/Yellowknife/Saskatoon/Montreal/Cape Breton they're all going to sound vastly different, even to an untrained ear.

It just helps us to lump together similar-sounding groups of regional/national accents that have more in common with each other than they do with outside accents. :)

Dyrnwyn
02-04-2010, 20:15
Bah(pause)ahl. Two syllables. Like a lot of folks I see it coming from Ba'al - only English doesn't use glottal stops so they don't get transcribed. Growing up in Hawaii you get used to seeing and pronouncing glottal stops everywhere though.

MajorWesJanson
02-04-2010, 22:11
BALE for - a false god.


DEAD false god ;)

Rioghan Murchadha
03-04-2010, 04:22
That's because you're an American. And no, I'm not having a jab at your intelligence, but the point above that you already have an "ar" sound in your "ah"s. ;)

Oh, we are... and it's maddening. :p

You know, considering that the English like to think they invented the english language, you would think they'd take the trouble to at least pronounce ALL the letters in the alphabet, regardless of their place in a word. :p

massey
03-04-2010, 05:02
You know, considering that the English like to think they invented the english language, you would think they'd take the trouble to at least pronounce ALL the letters in the alphabet, regardless of their place in a word. :p

It's funny how they think they invented it, yet they pronounce everything wrong. :D

Lothlanathorian
03-04-2010, 05:14
I don't know how to type how I say it. I pronounce a lot of words different and funny. Ball and Bawl sound different when I same them, so do your and you're. (Yoor and You-Err).

I think the Blood Angels planet I would pronounce just like they did Baal's name in SG1.

Granted, the name I have used for my Khornate Lord and my Gamertag are Baalthor. I say it like Ball, but I drag the 'ah' sound out a bit longer. Almost like it is two u's.

druchii
03-04-2010, 05:26
It's pronounced Bale. Like bale of hay, or you're posting bail for someone in jail.

It's a reference to Baal, the false god that Jezebel convinced King Ahab to worship, in the tale of Elijah, in the Bible.

No doubt, no R. No Ball (although I actually like Ball, better than Bale/bail). Just the way it is. Accents aside (which don't really count anyway).

d

kardar233
03-04-2010, 05:51
Raellos, 'bale' is a Hebrew thing. Blame the Jews.

This might be a joke, but I'm biting anyway: as a taught Hebrew speaker who knows several native speakers, the glottal stop is very prominent and 'bale', at least according to Semitic pronunciation, it entirely incorrect.


It's a reference to Baal, the false god that Jezebel convinced King Ahab to worship, in the tale of Elijah, in the Bible.

Precisely. Except, if you ask any native Hebrew speaker, they will say it with the distinct pause in the middle, which is exactly what the letter Ayin is used for.

Arbiter7
03-04-2010, 06:27
Bail is ridiculous. Just because it was used in Diablo doesn't make it right. Nor is the correct one correct because it was used in Baldur's Gate.

One more time, it's BA-AHL, or BA-ARL if you pronounce the R as in british english (ah) - i'm using keyboard terms here ;-)

The reason is simple. "A" isn't pronounced "AY" in the middle-east or Egypt, from where the name originates. "AY" is mostly English, and may be found in other languages which are not phonetic (i.e. you don't pronounce it like you read it). "A" is usually read as in "abbA". In english (mostly american english), even the first "A" in "ABBA" will have a slight distortion, so I'm using the last in "abba" as an example.

So, like others have pointed out, it's TWO syllables, BA-AHL where the H represents adding some depth in the second "A".

Scryer in the Darkness
03-04-2010, 06:32
You apparently haven't heard a real "ar" sound. :) Let me find you some Jeff Foxworthy...
Let me find my shotgun so I can blow my brains out before you do that. Talking about abomination... Jeff Foxworthy... *shudder*


I agree on "bale" sounding odd. But to us West Coast Americans, ball, bawl, bahl, and barl with a British accent all sound the same.

"Ball" must sound different in British English for you to make that comment.

Ball sounds very different to barl, etc in British and indeed Australian English. However I find Americans so thickly pronounce their vowels and shove r's where they need not be, to be almost comical at times. I especially love asking an American to pronounce "oral" and "aural". Oh, the hilarity. :D


You know, considering that the English like to think they invented the english language, you would think they'd take the trouble to at least pronounce ALL the letters in the alphabet, regardless of their place in a word. :p

As opposed to Americans who shove r's into every vowel sound by default. :rolleyes: It's surreal.

druchii
03-04-2010, 07:06
This might be a joke, but I'm biting anyway: as a taught Hebrew speaker who knows several native speakers, the glottal stop is very prominent and 'bale', at least according to Semitic pronunciation, it entirely incorrect.



Precisely. Except, if you ask any native Hebrew speaker, they will say it with the distinct pause in the middle, which is exactly what the letter Ayin is used for.

Hey that's ok too. None of this R crap.

d

jesusjohn
03-04-2010, 12:43
I belive Baal is pronounced Transylvania ;)

Dumah
03-04-2010, 13:31
Just don't say it three times while looking in a mirror or Christian Bale will appear and assault you for interrupting his scene...

I too have always pronounced it "Bale".

Arbedark
03-04-2010, 13:51
To use that one guy's example of Baal rhyming with "Carl"... well, a North American would pronounce Carl something like car-ull, whereas a Briton's pronunciation of the same word would sound to us like cah-ull or call / caul.

What an utter load of drivel.

I'm not sure if you only watch Hugh Grant movies and think all British people speak like that, but you're pulling that out where the sun don't shine mate.

Raellos
03-04-2010, 14:37
Doesn't sound incorrect to me. Remember that's an interpretation from an American point of view, so if you render it between the two it sounds fairly correct.

Obviously it's not going to apply to all English accents, but not actively pronouncing the 'r' towards the end of words is common, yes?

Arbedark
03-04-2010, 15:17
Obviously it's not going to apply to all English accents, but not actively pronouncing the 'r' towards the end of words is common, yes?

No .

Raellos
03-04-2010, 15:26
Which parts of England to the r's drop off then? With the exception of one, all of the English people I've known do this.

Arbiter7
03-04-2010, 15:40
Scotsmen. But they're not part of England ;-)


Still, bale is plain wrong. You can call it anything you like, mind you, but it's still incorrect. Like I said, no "AE", "AY", "AI" or the like for "A" in the middle east.

Arbedark
03-04-2010, 15:45
Which parts of England to the r's drop off then? With the exception of one, all of the English people I've known do this.

To the best of my knowledge, very little.

It's not like British people say "vey" instead of very, "bun" instead of burn etc...:wtf:

And this is coming from a Yorkshire lad, where we say "be rate" instead of "It'll be alright", "ont / int" onstead of "on the / in the" and much other nonsense...:rolleyes:

DeadlySquirrel
03-04-2010, 17:11
its barl, yes.

SandQueen
03-04-2010, 17:19
its pronounced how it looks. "Ball" with a longer "A" sound. I dont understand how someone could see it as "barl", there is no "R"