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RevEv
29-04-2010, 12:19
In an interview in this months SFX magazine Sir Terry Pratchett gives his opinion on Citadel miniatures.

Apparently, if they had been around when he was younger we wouldn't have all the wonderful novels he has written, he 'would have spent my whole time painting the little miniatures! I love the figures.'

Now, that is praise indeed from one of the most creative minds in fantasy writing.

Jedi152
29-04-2010, 12:34
Pratchett was one of the first approached to write official novels for the Warhammer background. He was interested, but ended up turning down the contract they offered.

http://www.vectormagazine.co.uk/article.asp?articleID=42

Zenithfleet
29-04-2010, 14:15
You know, at first that sounds completely wrong (there's not exactly a huge amount of blood in your average Discworld novel) but then again, Pratchett + Warhammer Orcs = genius...

There's a line of Discworld 28mm figures out there somewhere. Can't remember the company though.

Damien 1427
29-04-2010, 14:31
There's a line of Discworld 28mm figures out there somewhere. Can't remember the company though.

http://www.shop.microartstudio.com/discworld-miniatures-c-48.html

I dunno, Sir Terry would certainly have an interesting take on the setting. That alone would be worth it, especially as he's more than capable of writing fiction with a serious edge to it.

Venkh
29-04-2010, 14:43
I would love that. Perhaps he could be persuaded to write a short story or a novella. Not because of his illness, just because a novel would involve too much time away from his other projects. I would love to see his unique take on the background.

Pokpoko
29-04-2010, 15:28
I imagine if he was allowed to set the tone with the earliest books 40k and WFB would look slightly different today, probably would retain a lot more of the earliest tongue-in-cheek attitude.

sliganian
29-04-2010, 15:54
Dunno. I've always found Pratchett to be one of those authors whom everyone makes out to be much more clever than he actually is, and he actually buys into his own press on the issue.

EmperorNorton
29-04-2010, 16:05
And I'd have to say that Pratchett is even more clever than everyone makes him out to be.
With Night Watch he even proved that he can write grimdark.

sliganian
29-04-2010, 16:56
And I'd have to say that Pratchett is even more clever than everyone makes him out to be.
With Night Watch he even proved that he can write grimdark.

Haven't read so I can't comment.

Maybe I just got so sick of everyone touching themselves inappropriately over 'Good Omens' so that when I read it I didn't find as remotely awesome as it was touted to be.

x-esiv-4c
29-04-2010, 17:04
Nightwatch was incredible. It falls into the same category as Monstrous Regiment.

Havarel
29-04-2010, 18:25
Nightwatch was incredible. It falls into the same category as Monstrous Regiment.

.......really? Nightwatch was incredible, I fully agree (re-reading it now), but Monstrous Regiment?? Easily one of his worst books, the only one i've never successfully re-read.

But I think it would have been interesting to see Warhammer books by Sir Terry.

Wintermute
29-04-2010, 18:47
Nightwatch was incredible. It falls into the same category as Monstrous Regiment.

No, no, no. Montrous Regiments is one of the poorest of the series. Not as poor as The Last Continent, but still very poor.

Nightwatch is probably the last really good Discworld novel. Non of his subsequent Discworld books have matched it. (I am excluding the Tiffany Archer books in this comparison though because they are not Discworld Novels but 'Stories of the Discworld' and they are better than all of the 'adult' Discworld novels since Nightwatch).

RevEv
29-04-2010, 19:21
Wintermute - surely you mean Tiffany Aching (sheesh, any REAL Pratchett fan would know the difference:evilgrin:)

Agreed that Nightwatch is one of his best pieces, but I would not discount the Moist von Lipwig tales so readily, they are very good, nor Thud. Indeed the latter had me in tears as I finished it, the main plot premise being very close to my heart at the time Vimes always reads 'Where's my Cow' to his son every night at 6pm, and it is this knowledge and practise that helps him defeat his enemy so he may return to his family. I finished the book two days before deploying to Iraq for seven months, and I always read to my sons at 6pm

Damien 1427
29-04-2010, 19:49
Monstrous Regiment is one of his worst ones, yeah, but I'm not a huge fan of Night Watch since I'm not a huge fan of the time travel element. However, I still think Going Postal is one of the best he's ever written. Such a shame they adapated it for TV.

But a bad book for Sir Terry is still a damned good book.

RCgothic
29-04-2010, 20:04
Night Watch is definitely my favourite discworld book. See how they rise up. :)

spetswalshe
29-04-2010, 20:26
I stopped reading after 'The Truth' - not really by conscious choice, more because other things got in the way. However, having attempted to get back into them recently, I found I couldn't stand the style - there seems to be almost no exposition, with a huge amount of the page devoted to dialogue. But mainly it's because for some reason I always pictured Vimes as looking like the fat centurion from the Asterix books (while at a young enough age for such foundless ideas to take root), and I feel it's become increasingly difficult to equate that image with the reality.

sigur
29-04-2010, 20:44
I would very much liked Terry Pratchett to have written Warhammer novels. It definately would have fit better with earlier editions of the game (going well with Kirby's art. ;) ) But I think it would still work. Don't really care about grimdarkness in WHFB and just look at Ciaphas Cain novels; they pull off an approach to 40k I very much appreciate. Pratchett could do something similar (not that the master would copy the style, I'm just implying that it could work very well with WHFB).

RevEv
30-04-2010, 06:44
However, I still think Going Postal is one of the best he's ever written. Such a shame they adapated it for TV.

I wouldn't write it off too readily, Sir Terry speaks about Going Postal in the same interview and is extremely happy with the results - even if they have let some rank amateur in at the last moment for a bit part, as they have in the previous two films.



I always pictured Vimes as looking like the fat centurion from the Asterix books (while at a young enough age for such foundless ideas to take root), and I feel it's become increasingly difficult to equate that image with the reality.

Me too, but more as a disappointed copper upon which too much had been heaped. As soon as Carrot arrived in Guards, Guards he started to have the resources to do his job. Now he has more the feel of Gene Hunt, with wittier lines.

Jedi152
30-04-2010, 07:38
No, no, no. Montrous Regiments is one of the poorest of the series. Not as poor as The Last Continent, but still very poor.
I quite liked the Last Continent.

The worst for me are Small Gods and Pyramids. I really struggled with those.

Night Watch was the best in recent years. I loved Going Postal too.

RCgothic
30-04-2010, 07:46
I really like Small Gods. Pyramids though was fairly weak I agree. Perhaps Moving Pictures as well wasn't so great.

Bladelord
30-04-2010, 07:48
In an interview in this months SFX magazine Sir Terry Pratchett gives his opinion on Citadel miniatures.

Apparently, if they had been around when he was younger we wouldn't have all the wonderful novels he has written, he 'would have spent my whole time painting the little miniatures! I love the figures.'

Now, that is praise indeed from one of the most creative minds in fantasy writing.
I'm not surprised at that. I actually had some suspicions in that direction. ;)

Pratchett was one of the first approached to write official novels for the Warhammer background. He was interested, but ended up turning down the contract they offered.

http://www.vectormagazine.co.uk/article.asp?articleID=42
:eek:

Noooo! That'd have been the funniest Warhammer novel ever written! And god knows what madness it could have rubbed off into the Orcs & Goblins army list! Noooo! :)

Damien 1427
30-04-2010, 08:06
I wouldn't write it off too readily, Sir Terry speaks about Going Postal in the same interview and is extremely happy with the results - even if they have let some rank amateur in at the last moment for a bit part, as they have in the previous two films.

I never saw The Colour of Magic, but I did see the first half of Hogfather. It was fist-chewingly awful, and afterwards I did regret that Sir Terry hadn't stuck to his guns like he had done over the years when people offered to adapt the books for the big and small screens.

Jedi152
30-04-2010, 08:24
I really like Small Gods. Pyramids though was fairly weak I agree. Perhaps Moving Pictures as well wasn't so great.

I think the problem i had with SG was that i just don't 'get' religion, or religious jokes/satire.

@N0th1ng c4n b34t 3lv3s: You just know he'd be an O&G player... ;)

Bookwrak
01-05-2010, 08:54
I never saw The Colour of Magic, but I did see the first half of Hogfather. It was fist-chewingly awful, and afterwards I did regret that Sir Terry hadn't stuck to his guns like he had done over the years when people offered to adapt the books for the big and small screens.
While certainly uneven, I'd say Hogfather is a very long way from awful. Marc Warren's rendition of Mr. Teatime is spectacular, and except for the snowman scene, Death was an absolute treat throughout the entire thing.

Damien 1427
01-05-2010, 09:46
Marc Warren's rendition of Mr. Teatime is spectacular

Really? I found it terrible. The silly voice was what got me the most. Mr. Teatime spoke like a normal, affable, pleasent young man... It's just what he said in those even, cheerful tones is what made him so disturbing. Marc Warren made him sound like he'd been on heavy medication that contained a great deal of helium.

Chadjabdoul
01-05-2010, 09:48
Small Gods is my favourite overall I think...
A great main character and (the exact opposite of) a great vilain is probably the reason.

Lords and Ladies is a close second. I believe it's the darkest one I've read.

Nightwatch is the only one I've read this decade. It is indeed, very good.

Sclep
01-05-2010, 11:37
Feet of clay. Thud. I'm so glad that he didn't get involved with GW.

GitzBlasta
02-05-2010, 22:45
I think I like every book he's ever written. Night Watch is at least joint best, alongside Lords & Ladies.

Monstrous Regiment was really good, I love that Sir Terry adds the serious bits to his books now, they're funny and political (to me at least!).

As soon as I saw Ashes to Ashes and Life on Mars (UK version!) I finally had a picture of Vimes in my head. The proverbial alcohol soaked, hard-bitten, tired copper.

Best character is Granny Weatherwax :D

blackcherry
02-05-2010, 23:38
I think I have a hard time choosing the best of his books. Of late, he has been firing at full guns, whilst his earlier books are written in such a different style you can love them for completly different reasons.

Hellebore
03-05-2010, 00:00
No, no, no. Montrous Regiments is one of the poorest of the series. Not as poor as The Last Continent, but still very poor.


Last Continent might be poor or so esoteric that it's only funny to some people.

For me, it was hilarious but then there were so many Australian references in it that I got. The Man from Snowy River, Vegemite, Waltzing Matilda, Bush Rangers (Ned Kelly) Aboriginal Dream time and so on.

Plus it has one of the best Death lines in the whole series:

"Bring me all the information on the NON poisonous animals of XXXX." Piece of paper flutters down.
piece of paper reads: "some of the sheep."

Which is again another Australian reference. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNEeq5qGh8I

It really gets beyond a joke when even the platypus is venomous...

Hellebore

Spectrar Ghost
03-05-2010, 00:03
Last Continent was one of my favorites, as well. Pretty much anything where Susan Sto Helit or Death have large parts, too. Especially Reaper Man.

Hellebore
03-05-2010, 00:09
Oh yeah and the platypus being a 'duck invented by committee'. :D

Hellebore

spaint2k
03-05-2010, 02:15
Haven't read so I can't comment.

Maybe I just got so sick of everyone touching themselves inappropriately over 'Good Omens' so that when I read it I didn't find as remotely awesome as it was touted to be.

I think there's a lot of elements in Good Omens that might be lost on you since you're from Canada. If you had the cultural baggage of coming from the British Isles you might have found it funnier.

OPULENCE
03-05-2010, 09:44
Out of all the books I still think that Witches Abroad is my favourite! Although there is no denying Night Watch is excellent. And i have to agree about Monstrous Regiment being the only Pratchett book i have not read more than once.

The Sphinx scene from Pyramids is pure brilliance though! :)

Graf of Orlock
03-05-2010, 15:58
Really? I found it terrible. The silly voice was what got me the most. Mr. Teatime spoke like a normal, affable, pleasent young man... It's just what he said in those even, cheerful tones is what made him so disturbing. Marc Warren made him sound like he'd been on heavy medication that contained a great deal of helium.

Totally agree. I really don't know why he chose to do an exagerated version of Johnny Depp's Willy Wonka voice, but it really doesn't work. Aside from that and David Jason (who's best work was as Blanko in Porridge), I rather liked the rest of Hogfather.

Warren also did a terrible Marlon Brando impersonation when playing Old Man Dracula in the terrible, terrible '06 BBC adaptation, too.

simonr1978
03-05-2010, 18:21
I admit I haven't watched it, but, intrigued by some of the comments on here I checked out some clips on youtube. I have to agree that the portrayal of Teatime, based on what I saw looks terrible, enough to put me off wanting to watching it in its entirety. There's no way I could cope with that ridiculous voice for that long.

Ozorik
03-05-2010, 18:37
Unseen academicals was pretty poor, probably one of his weakest books, but then I don't like football. Thud and Nightwatch are two of his better books, certainly in recent years (Sam Vimes is possibly my favourite fictional character).

I wonder if he did write warhammer novels in the early days would it have any effect on the game as a whole? A bit less of the unrelenting GRIMDARK(tm) and more humour and intelligence?

AndrewGPaul
03-05-2010, 19:59
I liked The Last Continent, up until the end when the Wizards arrive at Bugarup University. I admit that I'm still slightly unclear as to what exactly was going on.

chub
03-05-2010, 20:33
I never saw The Colour of Magic, but I did see the first half of Hogfather. It was fist-chewingly awful, and afterwards I did regret that Sir Terry hadn't stuck to his guns like he had done over the years when people offered to adapt the books for the big and small screens.
I dont think this is correct iirc he done an interview when coulor of magic came out and stated that he had problems in gettin it made as he had previously sold the film rights to another company. on a side note i liked colour of magic but the should hav made two seires instead of the one.

Rekmar
04-05-2010, 14:28
I thought that Making Money (the follow up to Going Postal) was absolutely brilliant. After spending some time working in London's financial district I can see that this has had a lot of influence on this book and just makes me giggle everytime that I read it.

As for my favourite, have to go with Night Watch. Just one of those books that you can read and read again and still laugh at the funny bits.

crandall87
04-05-2010, 18:03
Unfortunatly I have been collecting and painting on and off since I was about 11 years old. My great series of novels will never get written now :(

Wintermute
04-05-2010, 18:33
My favourite is Mort and has been since I first read it back in 1987 :eek:

RevEv
04-05-2010, 18:51
Best character is Granny Weatherwax :D

After Vimes I'd second that.

Ironically my kids call the Grandmothers Granny and Nanny. Granny is very astute and austere, Nanny is genial and a superb cook.

chub
04-05-2010, 20:25
After Vimes I'd second that.

Ironically my kids call the Grandmothers Granny and Nanny. Granny is very astute and austere, Nanny is genial and a superb cook.
funnily enough this was the same when i was growing up perhaps this shows terrys grasp on human nature? as far as my favourite novel goes it has to be colour of magic, however I really like THUD as it has real reverberations (is that the right word) of NI where i live

Son of the Lion
04-05-2010, 21:49
I love most of his novels, and have a particular fondness for the Guards and Witches series, but I think he stretches successful characters and plot devices too far somtimes - To me, Pratchett's 'best' work is when he is doing something 'fresh' with the world or his style and The early 'magic' books, Nightwatch, Faust Eric, Mort, Guards Guards, Good Omens and Strata are all good examples of this.

Novrain
05-05-2010, 09:43
The Fifth Elephant, Night Watch and Thud! are my favourites, tho I have always had a soft spot for the Truckers, Diggers and Wings books :D

( what was the book by him about people that lived in the carpet? Was it called The Carpet People or am I hallucinating?)

Sclep
05-05-2010, 17:05
No hallucinations. I love that book too.

de Selby
05-05-2010, 20:33
Small Gods is probably my favourite although I haven't read it in a while. In fact I haven't read anything discworld for a while.

I can't imagine Pratchett in either of the GW universes really. He's fundamentally optimistic about human nature; nearly everything nearly always turns out alright in the end. This is antithetical to the warhammer settings.

lord ugwart
06-05-2010, 13:14
Lords and Ladies is my favourite discworld novel, although I love the guards books, with Jingo been the best of the bunch. Discworld was slightly marred for me however when I later discovered that it was a knock off from Fritz Liebers Lankhmar novels, now that guy was a genius. Least favourite discworld book would have to be Unseen Academicals, I still have yet to finish it, a first for me, as I usually read through them in 3 days tops.

x-esiv-4c
06-05-2010, 14:20
Thief of time and reaper man rank as my top two Pratchett choices.

Damien 1427
06-05-2010, 15:56
Discworld was slightly marred for me however when I later discovered that it was a knock off from Fritz Liebers Lankhmar novels, now that guy was a genius.

The only place you'll find echoes of that is in the first two or three books, and it's only really obvious in The Colour of Magic - Along with the really obvious shoutouts to Conan the Barbarian, HP Lovecraft and the Dragonriders of Pern.

de Selby
06-05-2010, 17:59
Indeed. Pratchett's first few 'spoof' fantasy novels were written for an audience he assumed would be familiar with Lieber, Howard, Lovecraft etc. These days people are more likely to start with the discworld and work backwards (similarly, Strata only makes sense if you've read Larry Niven's Ringworld).

Son of the Lion
07-05-2010, 09:28
...(similarly, Strata only makes sense if you've read Larry Niven's Ringworld).
You think? I've never read Ringworld and I enjoyed Strata immensely.

de Selby
07-05-2010, 19:30
;) Well you should, it's clever and quite funny in its own right. But when I read it for the first time and realised how much of Strata is spoofing it, it enhanced both books for me.

ChaosBeast
08-05-2010, 20:37
i liked monstrous regiment. i even liked unseen academicals and i really dont like football. The thing is with terry pratchett is he could write a novel about stationery and he could still make it interesting just from the jokes he makes and his descriptions of characters and places.

in my opinion Thud! was his best and then Mort, but thats mostly because i love Death. colour of magic left me kind of underwhelmed though

ctsteel
09-05-2010, 00:04
The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents is a moving story.

My wife has the entire Pratchett collection (including short stories in various collected SF/Fantasy novels) - so far I've only read just over a dozen or so books (first 9 or so Discworld, Wee Free Men/Tiffany Aching series, Carpet People, Truckers etc, Good Omens and Amazing Maurice). I read Amazing Maurice before I read Reaper Man, so it was interesting to see
the creation of Rat Death since I'd already met him.

Wintermute
09-05-2010, 07:44
Its always advisable to read the books in the order they were published so you can see how Terry's style has developed and changed over the years. This is how I've encountered the books but this is because I started collecting them when The Colour of Magic was first published in paperback :eek:

chub
09-05-2010, 09:20
I totally agree with wintermute as I started with colour of magic way back when. though how much his writing will change in the coming years is something we will have to wait for though, especially if you are like me and wait for his annual book release (almost like I waited for the beano annual when I was a kid)

brightblade
09-05-2010, 13:24
I personally think that Pratchett's later novels are little short of genius. The level of satire and subtle obsevation is humourous, enlightening, scary and fun. Not many writers can achieve that.

I too started way back when and thought he lost his way a little (around book 9)then got his mojo back and really kicked on with Nightwatch, Thud and Going Postal really shining out.

Having said that I adore Nanny Og and Greebo.

All together now 'Aaaaaaaaa, Wizard's staff has a knob on the end, knob on the end, knob on the end, a wizard's staff has a knob.......' :D

Zenithfleet
11-05-2010, 13:40
People earlier in this thread including but not limited to Wintermute: Monstrous Regiment is poor? How very dare you! :p It's my absolute fave.

Then again, my other favourite Pratchett is The Dark Side of the Sun, so draw your own conclusions. :D

Monstrous Regiment does seem to utterly polarise opinions though. People want to either kill it with fire or make babies with it. A lot of people say it's a one-joke book, but there's just so much great war-story stuff in there (and the grimdark is dialed down a bit from the slightly alarming extreme of Night Watch). I've read a fair bit of feminist history so it hits all the right notes there too.

Now The Last Continent... that's pretty poor. Sorry Hellebore, I'm an Aussie too but I'd still like an actual plot to go with my parody. :shifty:

Haven't been very impressed with his last few--Unseen Academicals felt like it was missing a final polish, possibly because he's using that dictation software thingy now. To me the 'final Discworld novel' is Thud, and everything after that is good fan fiction. Still, he's definitely got a good excuse (the whole awful early-onset Alzheimer's thing.)

And for the record I don't think Dark Side is one of his best--not by a long way--but bigods I adore it anyway :)

Anyway, back on topic... someone mentioned Ciaphas Cain. Now that's the kind of 40K series I'd love to see Pratchett write.

...It would actually be funny, for starters. :angel:

Wintermute
11-05-2010, 19:09
People earlier in this thread including but not limited to Wintermute: Monstrous Regiment is poor? How very dare you! :p It's my absolute fave.

My problem with Monstrous Regiment is I thought he plot was very, very predictable.

Ozorik
11-05-2010, 21:54
Books that I think are poor people seem to love while books that I think are very good others seem to think that they are poor. Its a tribute to his ability that there is no real consensus as to what his worst books are.

I actually liked the last continent :)

Damien 1427
11-05-2010, 22:10
Its a tribute to his ability that there is no real consensus as to what his worst books are.

Equal Rites is the only one I can't reread, it just doesn't work for me.

RevEv
13-05-2010, 19:13
Equal Rites is the only one I can't reread, it just doesn't work for me.

Yet my wife loves it - takes all sorts!

Huw_Dawson
14-05-2010, 01:59
Eeesh... my favourite are the Lancre novels (beginning with Equal Rites, which I find competent but an example of how Pratchett could have gone down a far different road to the one that he did) which after a re-reading should always be completed with the watching of the two Discworld cartoons (Witches Abroad and Soul Music, I believe) which far, far too few people have watched.

Zenithfleet
14-05-2010, 11:19
We had those cartoons run a few times on kids' afternoon TV here in Oz. I remember tuning in randomly during the Valkyrie scene and thinking 'huh, wonder what this show is, pretty unoriginal, wonder if anyone's complained that they're blatantly nicking ideas from Discworld...'

Then the credits came up and I felt silly. :)

x-esiv-4c
14-05-2010, 11:40
I have to say that the "Colour of Magic" movie was quite well done (at least I thought so).