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Green-is-best
04-05-2010, 22:01
So, I've been thinking about making the jump into Forge World resin kits, but I've heard that some of the molds, specifically the T-Hawk, are just awful. Which of the larger models would you guys recommend for somebody who is just getting started with resin kits? Reaver? Warhound?

Ozendorph
04-05-2010, 22:05
I assume by the models you're listing that you're an Imperial player. For a first kit would you consider one of the Macharius variants, or are those not large enough? The Macharius kits are very simple when compared to the titans, but you still get the experience of cleaning and trimming up bits, possibly heating and bending some barrels, and a very low chance of missing or unusable parts.

Green-is-best
04-05-2010, 22:15
A Macharius would be good. It's a fairly impressive table piece but not so expensive that I will feel like running into traffic on the 405 when I inevitably make some newbie mistake.

Thanks!

Arvendragon
04-05-2010, 22:25
Manta.

xD

But something small, I'd suggest Macharius too. Unless you want something more like an upgrade kit....

Vulture / Valkyrie Sky Talon looks pretty good too. So do the other airplanes.

Godzooky
04-05-2010, 22:26
Have you considered starting very small and working up? Resin is a sumbitch.

What about starting with an inquisitor, then a dread, then a tank, then a titan? :)

starlight
04-05-2010, 22:44
Personally, I'd go for something Dreadish in size...then tank, then titan... But that's me. :)

Doppleskanger
05-05-2010, 00:16
hmm my FW experience....
It's ok, first was the BT dread but some of the chains were so delicate they were broke (I guess someone sneezed in the factory!) and they had to come off round the ankles of the skeleton on the banner.
The only other I have is the now reduntant Vindicator kit, which was obviously a lot more bulky. It was fine, had to green stuff a few bubbles, but other than that no probs.
The general consensus round here is that the big kits can be a b***h so I would start smaller and work up.
Why not try a Dreadnaught Drop pod? It's a useful model, much bigger than the plastic kit, and will give you an idea about how you like working with resin?

MajorWesJanson
05-05-2010, 00:23
I'd start with a Dreadnought. Good presence on the tabletop for the effort you have to put into building it.

DuskRaider
05-05-2010, 00:33
Reaver Titan, 100%.

Doppleskanger
05-05-2010, 00:41
@WesJohnson

But the dreads are all about fine detail. They are amazing models, but won't give him the experience he is after if he's really considering a Thunderhawk or a Titan. Those big struts and the dozer blade on the vindicator have more in common with the big models than the banners and so on that are on the dreads.

MajorWesJanson
05-05-2010, 01:27
@WesJohnson

But the dreads are all about fine detail. They are amazing models, but won't give him the experience he is after if he's really considering a Thunderhawk or a Titan. Those big struts and the dozer blade on the vindicator have more in common with the big models than the banners and so on that are on the dreads.

WesJohnson? Seriously? :eyebrows:

As an intro to larger kits, a dreadnought is not the best, but it is a good intro into resin in general, with the high detail, need to wash it, and usually fiddly little pieces like the head and claws on the arm. Plus it is not so expensive that a major screwup will put you out a ton of money. And it is usable in normal games just fine.

If you want to graduate to larger models, I would go Dreadnought, Stormblade or Macharius, Warhound, then Reaver.

Gensuke626
05-05-2010, 03:20
So, I've been thinking about making the jump into Forge World resin kits, but I've heard that some of the molds, specifically the T-Hawk, are just awful. Which of the larger models would you guys recommend for somebody who is just getting started with resin kits? Reaver? Warhound?

10 man squad of DKoK.

Green-is-best
05-05-2010, 03:48
Thanks for the advise, gents. The dread sounds like a good place to start too. Decisions, decisions...

Irondog
05-05-2010, 04:43
From the models you listed, I'd say go with Imperial (i.e. a Dread or something). But your screen name syggests you're an Ork fan. In which case I'd say go with either a Fighta Bommer or a Squiggoth (the smaller one). The Gargantuan Sguiggoth is a really cool model, but not exactly easy on the pocket book.

Simo429
05-05-2010, 05:48
i dont want to hijack your thread but it seems stupid to start a new one

whats the point of forgeworld? why dont they just make those models out of plastic or metal instead of resin?

GimpMaster
05-05-2010, 05:54
i dont want to hijack your thread but it seems stupid to start a new one

whats the point of forgeworld? why dont they just make those models out of plastic or metal instead of resin?

to retain the detail needed for the forgeworld molds metal would be necessary (plastic technology just isn't that good yet)

and a metal reaver titan would be outrageously heavy and expensive to ship...

light like plastic...detailed like metal (and much easier to convert than metal as well)

also when resin breaks it usually leaves a clean break so it is relatively easy to repair accidents..

back to the OT...REAVER TITAN! ofcourse...why start anywhere else when you can blow that much money on awesomeness... just make sure you know some one who has worked with resin before. so you can get the pointers on how to make it work for you properly.

Simo429
05-05-2010, 06:44
to retain the detail needed for the forgeworld molds metal would be necessary (plastic technology just isn't that good yet)

and a metal reaver titan would be outrageously heavy and expensive to ship...

light like plastic...detailed like metal (and much easier to convert than metal as well)

also when resin breaks it usually leaves a clean break so it is relatively easy to repair accidents..

back to the OT...REAVER TITAN! ofcourse...why start anywhere else when you can blow that much money on awesomeness... just make sure you know some one who has worked with resin before. so you can get the pointers on how to make it work for you properly.

thanks for the answer

do people ever think that there will be the technology to make things like titans in plastic

ive only ever had a few things from forgeworld
the first were renegade guard which i thought looked ****

my SW dreadnought was much better however

chromedog
05-05-2010, 06:53
Which of the larger models would you guys recommend for somebody who is just getting started with resin kits? Reaver? Warhound?

For someone just getting started with resin, I wouldn't recommend ANY FW resin kit, especially NOT a titan model. If you are hell bent on jumping into the deep end feet first, you will be better off taking that money and flushing it down the toilet. They are not models for beginners, and present a challenge even for experienced modellers.

Start with some of their infantry conversion kits or vehicle conversion kits for NORMAL, regular 40k (so no superheavies, no titans, etc). LEARN what it takes to deal with the various issues resin will have.

You need a different skillset to deal with resin.
Working with it is a dusty proposition, and dangerous or not, you really shouldn't be breathing in any kind of particulates or dust. A good respirator and face screen is recommended.
Damn good ventilation is also a requirement.
Patience is the thing that is most important, though.

chromedog
05-05-2010, 06:57
i dont want to hijack your thread but it seems stupid to start a new one

whats the point of forgeworld? why dont they just make those models out of plastic or metal instead of resin?


The demand just isn't there to pay for it.
20-30,000 pounds per sprue die set (minimum).

FW is generally the 'test bed' and 'proof of concept' department. When the demand is there, it generally becomes a 'new' plastic kit.

RCgothic
05-05-2010, 07:34
My first FW kit was a Vindicator conversion kit, and it was reasonably easy.

Perhaps one of the aircraft, a Thunderbolt or Lightning would be a good first kit?

As for titans, I actually think that the Reaver is an easier prospect than a Warhound, if riskier in terms of money. The Warhound's legs are a nightmare to put together.

Green-is-best
05-05-2010, 07:51
For someone just getting started with resin, I wouldn't recommend ANY FW resin kit, especially NOT a titan model. If you are hell bent on jumping into the deep end feet first, you will be better off taking that money and flushing it down the toilet. They are not models for beginners, and present a challenge even for experienced modellers.

Start with some of their infantry conversion kits or vehicle conversion kits for NORMAL, regular 40k (so no superheavies, no titans, etc). LEARN what it takes to deal with the various issues resin will have.

You need a different skillset to deal with resin.
Working with it is a dusty proposition, and dangerous or not, you really shouldn't be breathing in any kind of particulates or dust. A good respirator and face screen is recommended.
Damn good ventilation is also a requirement.
Patience is the thing that is most important, though.

What would you recommend in terms of a starter resin kit then? I'm not really keen on non-GW modeling, but if it is necessary to build up the skill set to put together some of the more impressive Forge World pieces, I might consider it.

chromedog
05-05-2010, 08:43
If you want to play with FW resin, then go with something like the Hydra model for IG, or the tau broadside variants, or even a dreadnought for any of the SM chapters.

Both will give you the practice and experience needed to deal with their 'product'.

You'll learn how to:
Remove the mold release they use (which sticks better than babygak to a blanket).
Straighten warped resin (both of these kits do suffer from warpage).
File, fill, smooth, sand and pin resin.

There. 'GW' model practice. The Hydra has rules in the IG codex so can be used without any other special books or whatever. Ditto for the Broadsides and dreadnought models. They also look cool.

Deamon-forge
05-05-2010, 08:51
i woukd go dread size first, or a named FW charitar. i wount jump the gun and go to large tank size yet.

e2055261
05-05-2010, 09:02
I reckon start with something cheap(ish);) Start on a bit of the scenery that they do; it will be one-piece (probably) and therefore fewer things to worry about. You can practise cleaning the model up and have something all your mates will want to game with :D If it's cheap and you muck it up, well you've not wasted a fortune...

splod
05-05-2010, 09:14
The demand just isn't there to pay for it.
20-30,000 pounds per sprue die set (minimum).

FW is generally the 'test bed' and 'proof of concept' department. When the demand is there, it generally becomes a 'new' plastic kit.

if this is so then why are the titans still plastic kits? it is one of thier major models of demand, yet GW refuses to make them...

my advice would be to get a tank kit of some sort just to learn the basics of thier models then move on to the bigger stuff...

chromedog
05-05-2010, 10:00
The titans are NOT plastic kits. Not by any stretch of the term.

They are RESIN kits. Only the stompa by GW is a plastic (titan) kit.
The Warhound and Reaver (all variants) are ALL resin models. With all of the attendant issues.

ChrisMurray
05-05-2010, 13:52
I started with Red scorpion shoulder pads and cmd Culln. I then progressed to the WE uprgrade kits and Zhofor. Soon I'll hopefully give a dread ago. Working from something simple and slowly increasing the dificulty is definately advised. Think how bad you'll feel if you splash out on a titan and you make a mistake.

yanlou
05-05-2010, 17:39
for me i started with the renegade rogue psykers, which i think is a very gd starting place, as there largly one piece models, apart from the amplifiers(i think thats what they are) and as there are only a few pieces less chance of problems and there very cheap, gd for first timers, then i think a dread would be next, like what did,
so for me in order from what i started, renegade rogue psykers -> dreadnoughts-> blood slaughterer,
so for you id suggest cheap 10-12 model like said psykers or something like red scorpions upgrade kit -> special Character -> dreadnought or large tanks conversion kit like mk2b landraider -> something like bloodslaughterer or blight drone -> something like a malcador -> macharius -> then maybe a titan,
this list will give you a chance to experience all aspects of resin, and help you build up to larger kits

RCgothic
05-05-2010, 17:57
My second kit was a warhound, and I got on fine. Don't be too put off by all these people saying that resin requires a different skill set. It does, but you pick it up very quickly, so don't worry about it too much.

If you get a standard size kit for your first go, say a Malcador, Lightning or Thunderbolt, you should have no problems then going straight on to a titan.

baphomael
05-05-2010, 19:59
A Manta. Definately a Manta.

It'd be such a good idea. Theres no way that wouldnt be a good idea.

Repentant Son
05-05-2010, 21:16
My second kit was a warhound, and I got on fine. Don't be too put off by all these people saying that resin requires a different skill set. It does, but you pick it up very quickly, so don't worry about it too much.

If you get a standard size kit for your first go, say a Malcador, Lightning or Thunderbolt, you should have no problems then going straight on to a titan.

I don't know if that's true for everyone, but I generally learn pretty quickly so I think I will follow your advice.

RCgothic
06-05-2010, 07:02
Key skills are:

Washing the models thoroughly with warm soapy water and an old toothbrush
Leaving to dry thoroughly in a warm (but not hot) place for a week - improperly mixed resin will become greasy/oily again, and must be replaced
Recognise warped or broken parts, and resin that is too soft or rubbery, and fixing/re-bending or replacing those parts
Cleaning sprues, flash, mold lines.
Pinning of large/structural parts
Greenstuffing the inevitable gaps
Priming well