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sliganian
05-05-2010, 17:31
Hi Folks:

I am looking to do some madcap scratch build work for a fledgling Ork army. However, nobody in my gaming group plays Orks. Looking at pics, Trukks seem to be a bit longer than a Rhino but also a touch narrower.

So.... what I need is for some helpful Mek to tell me the dimensions (LxWxH, in inches or cm if you prefer) of the 'official' Ork Trukk model. Ditto for a Battlewagon model as well. And also perhaps tell me how much the Ram adds.

Please note that my reasons for this are not to 'rip off' GW of a sale or to be excessively cheap on my end. The reason is that I want my scratch builds to be as close as possible to the 'real' dimensions so as to not raise any alarms with other players at tournaments or real LOS. The problem is that what I have in mind in no way resembles an actual Trukk.... :shifty:

LonelyPath
05-05-2010, 19:30
They are 5 1/2 x 3 x 3". The length also includes the ram (take 1/2" off if you leave it off).

sliganian
05-05-2010, 20:28
They are 5 1/2 x 3 x 3". The length also includes the ram (take 1/2" off if you leave it off).

Thanks! :)
Any ideas on the Battlewagon size? (not as critical, just curious)

Tethylis
05-05-2010, 21:41
The Battlewagon is 6.5" x 3.5" (slightly narrower at front and wider at back)
Height is 3" open topped or 5" with top/turret on

Hope that helps ;)

LonelyPath
05-05-2010, 22:03
In addition to Tethylis's dimensions, the Battlewagon is a inch longer with the deathrolla, it's pretty darn big! :)

Bestaltan
05-05-2010, 22:20
By the way, Ork trukk conversions are fun. I just finished my "trukk"wagon. Took two of my old fantasy chariots (since I don't play fantasy anymore) and hobbled together a 4-boar chariot. Looks rediculously out of place next to all of my battlewagons and other trukks, but it still plopped together nicely.

sliganian
06-05-2010, 01:06
Thanks everyone!

My idea (very formative) basically revolves around a (sort of real world) Marine naval assault ship. So the display/carry board would half an aircraft/heli carrier thingy (for 6 Deff Koptas) and then other half would accomodate the boys, ready to hit the beach in their "Trukks" -- which would be.... hovercraft. :D

Meriwether
06-05-2010, 01:18
My custom trukks are made from random stuff (mostly calculator chassis from unclaimed calculators at the end of the year in my classroom's lost and found, wheels and other gubbins from either (a) toy cars and trucks or (b) the old GW "gubbins bags" (which are no longer available for purchase)).

There was a thread on here some time ago where some guy posted a video on how he made his trukks: Buy some toy trucks of approximately the right size, put them in a garbage bag or pillow case, wail on them with a hammer so you have chunks but not powder, then dump them out and glue them together as fast as you can.

Add 40K-level detail after they dry.

They looked awesome. He made the video because people were asking him how he made such great-looking ork trukks.

Bestaltan
06-05-2010, 01:50
I still need to follow through on an idea a friend and I had. Build a battlewagon over a remote controlled car chassis. I love the idea of sitting back and actually driving my wagon 13". :D

Meriwether
06-05-2010, 12:11
A microprocessor and some encoders would allow you to ensure that it actually moves exactly 13" -- but that might be more money than you really want to spend!

sliganian
06-05-2010, 12:48
A microprocessor and some encoders would allow you to ensure that it actually moves exactly 13" -- but that might be more money than you really want to spend!

The real question for me is: can I actually get light enough working motors to make a hovercraft 'float'?;)

Meriwether
06-05-2010, 14:32
The real question for me is: can I actually get light enough working motors to make a hovercraft 'float'?;)

That might be a tall order. Most of the hovercraft projects I have seen are rather larger than a 40K-scale tank!

sliganian
06-05-2010, 16:00
That might be a tall order. Most of the hovercraft projects I have seen are rather larger than a 40K-scale tank!

Nothing so huge as that. :)

What I am thinking is if
- the main material is very light (e.g. body mostly blue foam with plasticard)
- with some sort of 'cup' shell around the edge at the bottom
- then if enough air could be moved to the bottom area from the top area via some dug out channels or piping
- then it might create enough cushion to 'float' a little bit. The shell is there to make air flow out from under it more slowly than air flowing in.

The challenges are (I think):

- the weight of any sort of small scale electric motor to drive a fan or two
- the power supply (batteries) for the motor
- MOTOR HEAT! Having your model flame-up after 30 seconds -- while dramatic - - could cause safety concerns.

Meriwether
06-05-2010, 16:09
Those are all significant challenges, yes.

But the biggest challenge is balance. Your center of gravity must not only be very, very spot-on, it must be stable (that is, small perturbations in position due to thrust, bumping, etc, must raise the CG slightly in all cases). The lighter the hovercraft, the more difficult this is to achieve.

Hashmal
06-05-2010, 16:10
Suddenly my friend's light up Monolith seem so pedestrian...

sliganian
06-05-2010, 16:24
Those are all significant challenges, yes.

But the biggest challenge is balance. Your center of gravity must not only be very, very spot-on, it must be stable (that is, small perturbations in position due to thrust, bumping, etc, must raise the CG slightly in all cases). The lighter the hovercraft, the more difficult this is to achieve.

Hmm... what about struts for the engine that sit above the main craft? Thus making a high centre of gravity and could be 'centred' by from all four corners. Here's a cheapo diagram of what I mean:

O <-- Fan assembly
/ \ <-- Strut assembly
____ <-- Hull area


Fan air 'out' could be piped down the back to the underside. Also, having the engine up and away from the hull could solve some cooling problems.

This brainstorming is fun, thanks. :)

Meriwether
06-05-2010, 17:52
High center of gravity is exactly the opposite of what you want. Low and centered is good.

...and maybe we should move this to PM, given that we have completely and thoroughly derailed the thread? (The OP's question has been answered, certainly, but this isn't the place, methinks, for a "how to build a hovercraft" conversation!)