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HeroFox
03-07-2010, 09:39
It's to my understanding that if you have a Musician in your unit, you can take a Ld. check at the beginning (?) of your movement phase, reform in any way you want, and proceed to move or shoot or both if you can.

You cannot march or charge obviously.

Yes/no?

Atrahasis
03-07-2010, 13:28
That's largely correct.

Do you have a specific question, or are you simply fishing for rules?

HeroFox
03-07-2010, 20:42
What is "largely" correct about it?

When do I take the leadership check to see if I can swift reform?

theunwantedbeing
03-07-2010, 20:55
What is "largely" correct about it?

All of it.


When do I take the leadership check to see if I can swift reform?

Presumably right before you want to swift reform, although it may well be afterwards or during your opponents magic phase, who knows really.

HeroFox
03-07-2010, 21:03
Can I do it after my shooting phase?

Example:
After I shoot with my LSG in 10x2 formation, can I SR into 5x4?

Mr_Rose
03-07-2010, 21:09
Not certain what theunwantedbeing is trying to say for sure, but I think it's related to the fact that several items, abilities, and spells can give you what amount to extra movement phases; in such cases you could take the swift reform option assuming the thing granting you the extra movement doesn't also restrict it in some way...

Falkman
03-07-2010, 22:19
The swift reform is made in your Remaining moves phase, before you move the unit in question.

Lord Zarkov
03-07-2010, 23:07
Can I do it after my shooting phase?

Example:
After I shoot with my LSG in 10x2 formation, can I SR into 5x4?

No.

And tbh you might as well keep them in 5x4 - what with bows getting volley fire you only lose 4 shots

HeroFox
04-07-2010, 05:32
No.

And tbh you might as well keep them in 5x4 - what with bows getting volley fire you only lose 4 shots

Stone Throwers.

To follow up with this:

Does swift reform still cause movement to do so, or can you make a full advance after?

Mr_Rose
04-07-2010, 06:58
What?
Swift Reform is a movement option, like marching or side-stepping. It is your movement for the turn.

Atrahasis
04-07-2010, 10:24
It isn't all your movement for the turn. It would be fairly pointless if it was.

Oberon
04-07-2010, 10:25
If I remember correctly, first you reform, then you test for the swift reform and if you pass, you can make normal move afterwards, not a march move.

Falkman
04-07-2010, 11:28
If I remember correctly, first you reform, then you test for the swift reform and if you pass, you can make normal move afterwards, not a march move.
This is correct. Or rather, you declare a Swift reform, test for it, if failed, you still have to execute the reform but don't get to move afterwards.

Mr_Rose
04-07-2010, 12:39
It isn't all your movement for the turn. It would be fairly pointless if it was.
How do you figure?
The option to reform (normally your entire movement) then move (normally also your entire movement) in one "manoeuvre" which takes up your entire movement sounds like a pretty useful option to me.

Falkman
04-07-2010, 13:03
The move part in your description isn't actually part of the Swift reform though.
A Swift reform simply allows you to move as normal after reforming, except you can't march.

Urgat
04-07-2010, 16:08
It isn't all your movement for the turn. It would be fairly pointless if it was.

Well it would be a regular reform :p


How do you figure?
The option to reform (normally your entire movement) then move (normally also your entire movement) in one "manoeuvre" which takes up your entire movement sounds like a pretty useful option to me.

I think you misundertood what he said ;)

SilasOfTheLambs
05-07-2010, 05:56
After you complete the reform, you can do all things you can normally do in "remaining moves."

However, if you fail the LD check the way I read the rule, you then have to do the reform any way and consequently can't do anything else.

I speak under correction... I was busy reading all the new OP magic stuff and didn't focus on this section.