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ORKY ARD BOYZ
27-07-2010, 10:02
Does steel, and by extension iron and copper officially exist in the Warhammer universe, or is the equivalent plasteel?

Polaria
27-07-2010, 10:11
Yes, they do exist.

MarcoSkoll
27-07-2010, 13:28
Does steel, and by extension iron and copper...
While there are iron/copper alloys, steels generally contain no copper at all (at least not intentionally). The normal second component of steel (after iron) is carbon, not copper.

Perfect Organism
27-07-2010, 14:12
I'm fairly sure that both iron and steel are mentioned as materials for armour in the Forge World Siege of Vraks books and several Dan Abnett novels.

metal bawks
27-07-2010, 15:02
"Steel Legion" is a hint I think.

MvS
27-07-2010, 15:47
Yes they all exist. I'm sure I've seen them mentioned from time to time in different publications, and even if they aren't, well, it just makes sense, no?

Plasteel is a term coined from Frank Herbert's Dune series and is used, I imagine, because it sounds suitably sci-fi and unusual - and because so much of 40K is lifted straight from Dune of course! ;)

Decius
27-07-2010, 23:38
I'd be very surprised if steel didn't exist in 40K. Very surprised.

Plasteel is probably just a superiour sci-fi version of steel. Steel still exists, but plasteel is just better. It's probably more common than steel on hive worlds and the like.

Askil the Undecided
28-07-2010, 01:18
Steel exists, virtually nothing so basic is magically missing in 40k.

UselessThing
28-07-2010, 01:35
Never call it steel if you can call it plasteel.

Never call it a radio if you can call it a voxcaster

Never call it a cigarette if you can call it a lho stick.

Avoid the mundane in all things.

burning crome
28-07-2010, 01:36
if i got it right most things are still made for steel e.i. tanks. Plasteel to my understanding is some sort of metal ceramic composite material. I not to sure where I got that might have been an old entry for terminator amour talking about the suits they use in fusion reactors. I do have some doubts since a long of the early fiction use to talk about building being made of the stuff but that might have just been them trying to hard to sound futuristic.

Vikingkingq
28-07-2010, 04:26
Burning Crome:

Isn't "metal ceramic composite material" ceramite?

In terms of futuristic materials, we have:
- rockcrete: concrete analog, but much stronger
- flakboard: a wood/fiberglass analog, since flak is bullet-proof-ish.
- ceramite : a durable ceramic compound, doesn't conduct heat
- plasteel: like people said, from Dune, my guess is that plasteel combines the strength and other properties of steel with the versatility and malleability of plastic, allowing it to be easily shaped into many different forms.
- armaplas: similar to plasteel and ceramite, might be an alloy of the two, used to make carapace armor
- adamantium: pretty close to the Marvel comics version, an extremely dense and durable metal.

Anything I missed?

To answer the OP, steel exists. On Feral or Feudal planets, you'd expect to find it being used for what we use it for IRL. But in areas with high-Imperial technology, like Hive or Imperial or Forge planets, I'm guessing steel is to them like swords made of solid pig iron would be to us - an inferior and obsolete technology.

kardar233
28-07-2010, 05:25
The question I'm interested in is whether they still use ballistic glass.

Polaria
28-07-2010, 05:52
The question I'm interested in is whether they still use ballistic glass.

Considering the fact that modern "ballistic glass" is not one material but a catch-all-category of all optically transparent materials that are particularly resistant to being penetrated when struck by bullets I would say YES, they still use "it". No telling what the "it" actually is though. Maybe transparent plasteel?

Askil the Undecided
28-07-2010, 15:48
Burning Crome:

Isn't "metal ceramic composite material" ceramite?

In terms of futuristic materials, we have:
- rockcrete: concrete analog, but much stronger
- flakboard: a wood/fiberglass analog, since flak is bullet-proof-ish.
- ceramite : a durable ceramic compound, doesn't conduct heat
- plasteel: like people said, from Dune, my guess is that plasteel combines the strength and other properties of steel with the versatility and malleability of plastic, allowing it to be easily shaped into many different forms.
- armaplas: similar to plasteel and ceramite, might be an alloy of the two, used to make carapace armor
- adamantium: pretty close to the Marvel comics version, an extremely dense and durable metal.

Anything I missed?

I love how in this quite common sense and intelligent list the concept of armaplas being plastics of sufficient toughness and solidity to use as armour wasn't considered, you know a catchall contraction for "armoured plastic" like the modern term "armoured glass" being shortened to armaglas to sounds space-y.

burning crome
28-07-2010, 20:25
I bow to Vikingkingq knowledge in this matter

Vikingkingq
28-07-2010, 20:28
I love how in this quite common sense and intelligent list the concept of armaplas being plastics of sufficient toughness and solidity to use as armour wasn't considered, you know a catchall contraction for "armoured plastic" like the modern term "armoured glass" being shortened to armaglas to sounds space-y.

It could well be, but we don't know anything about its properties beyond the name and that it's used in making carapace armor. It could be anything.

Scalebug
28-07-2010, 20:40
It could well be, but we don't know anything about its properties beyond the name and that it's used in making carapace armor. It could be anything.

Though a certain 14th century friar and philosopher would agree with Askil here... ;)

Askil the Undecided
29-07-2010, 00:36
I just don't get the logic of assuming something is a plastic-metallic-ceramic alloy rather than a tough plastic like kevlar or something when metals and ceramics aren't mentioned at all.

All the others can be deduced roughly from looking at the names:

plasteel = plas(tics)teel - makes sense - a light, strong, colourable material for weapons etc.
Ceramite = Cerami(c)te - makes sense - a heavy, non conductive, hardwearing material for heavy front-line armours and vehice hulls.
Armaplas = arm(our)[a]plas(tic) - makes sense - a tough, lightweight, colourable material for lighter body armours, eyepieces and reinforced windows.

Emperor's Grace
29-07-2010, 20:16
Maybe transparent plasteel?

Or maybe transparent aluminium? :)

Askil the Undecided
30-07-2010, 01:55
The real question is, if plasteel is a synthetic polymer and a Iron/Carbon mix is it thermoplastic or thermoset?

Both would have value in their own way.

SeaSwift
30-07-2010, 12:42
The real question is, if plasteel is a synthetic polymer and a Iron/Carbon mix is it thermoplastic or thermoset?

Plasteel is a solid concentration of Makebelieveium, I'm afraid.

geeksquared
30-07-2010, 12:51
Isn't there mention of a material called Armacrys being used for vision ports in tanks and bunkers in some of Dan Abnetts stuff? That would probably be analogous to modern ballistic glass

Sai-Lauren
30-07-2010, 12:58
Could be a steel fibre reinforced polymer - essentially lay down a steel fibre web in a mould, then inject the plastic (likely a thermoset) around it.

Or it could just be a steel that can be injection moulded like a plastic (probably in refractory ceramic moulds), rather than cast.

Armaplas - probably based on a kevlar or similar polymer weave, with other additions

Armacrys - maybe a grown pure diamond? Or a similar transparent crystalline structure, made of a single perfect crystal.

Leftenant Gashrog
02-08-2010, 15:23
Never call it a radio if you can call it a voxcaster


It should be noted that despite common usage etymologically speaking the defining characteristic of a 'radio' is something that uses radio waves, it could cover anything from a simple buzzer for morse code up to a high definition video camera (hence why the UK's main TV guide is still called the Radio Times, decades after the 'radio' listings were relegated to second place). The term voxcaster is therefor a rather good term since it describes what the device does.

Sai-Lauren
02-08-2010, 16:08
The term voxcaster is therefor a rather good term since it describes what the device does.

It would also describe both a megaphone and Keith Harris. ;)

Askil the Undecided
02-08-2010, 16:26
Plasteel is a solid concentration of Makebelieveium, I'm afraid.

No! Really? Damn!