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Oglog
09-08-2010, 17:49
i think this goes in general, but sorry if I have got it wrong.

With the island of blood coming out in less than a month, which is about the time of my brother's birthday, I was wondering if I could have an opinion from you guys about what sort of age is right for getting into the hobby. I am 15 and i have been painting minis from games workshop for at least 6 years. My brother is about to turn 8, and is starting to show an interest in some of my modelling, painting and battles. I even bought him his own brush and he has painted about 3 of my models, to a surprisingly good standard (for not even an 8 y/o). Have you had any experiences with youngsters in the hobby, and despite the fact that coupling his birthday and the release time of the new edition being conveniently close, do you still think he is too young?

My brother is quite mature for his age, both physically and mentally, and has a decent patience span and I'm certain his mental capactiy could cope with Warhammer rules. It would be a lovley thing to do, sitting down with him and assembling and painting a box with him (one army each-he seems to like the skaven which means I get that griffon to convert for my brets:D).

The dangers are obviously safety with glue, paint and potentially sharp tools (not too worried about if I supervise him, plus he seems quite sensible). I am more worried about that if I start him too young he could get frustrated (like me, he is a perfectionist) and be unsatisfied. A bad experience at this age could put him off the hobby for years to come.

This is a hard one and any imput would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers
/oglog:cheese:

Draeven
09-08-2010, 17:58
Well, if he is old enough to paint with you i wouldn't see an issue with him being old enough to play as long as you keep the rules simple and introduce the harder more complex rules as you go.

I would think as long as its just you playing him and teaching him i don't think he should get frustrated.

Kata
09-08-2010, 17:59
Genrally it is easier if you have someone close who knows how to play etc.

I beleive maybe 10 would be better but it helps to have someone ready to guide him.

Kata
09-08-2010, 18:00
Well, if he is old enough to paint with you i wouldn't see an issue with him being old enough to play as long as you keep the rules simple and introduce the harder more complex rules as you go.

I would think as long as its just you playing him and teaching him i don't think he should get frustrated.

Sorry I posted before seeing this. I basically agree with him and take it easy and slowly, don't rush.

Kadris
09-08-2010, 18:03
The big factors as you've noticed is patience and maturity. At my store we have a kid around 10 i think, not positive, but his necron army is painted better than many others i've seen at the store and online. I've played him once and he was a great opponent. I accidentally knocked his nightbringer off the table and he refused to let me buy him another one because he said, "fixing him will give me something to do".

So being young in years is not a deterrent if the kid is mature. However, as you stated he may get bad experiences being so young. Since he's painted with you some and enjoyed it, have you played a game with him? Judging this aspect may help you decide better.

If the aspects of model preping are a concern (possibly more for the parents) there is nothing stopping you from cutting out the models and cleaning them, then supervising his assembly or helping him with it. Flat out assembling them for him may be another option if he is like me and would love to have someone build his models for him (especially if he gets the skaven models and decides to build a slave army).

Another consideration is to ask your parents if its ok, they may cut you off there... unless you already asked them. You may also want to ask him indirectly if he wants to get more involved in what you paint, such as a full squad of basic models.

Orcboy_Phil
09-08-2010, 18:07
Depends on the person but as long as there not putting the figures in there mouth still they should be fine your brother sounds the right type.

No-One
09-08-2010, 18:12
patience is a HUGE factor, and maturity as well, as Kadris said. that said, breaking your little brother in slowly and having patience to teach him, especially if, and most like when, he gets distracted by other things, will help alot

my little sister is 13, and she's been building and painting a slaanesh+nurgle daemons for a little over 4 years now. this is including converting and minor GS sculpting, as an older sibling, i can tell you patience and a calm demeanor, as well as finding an army they like("pretty girls who rip you apart daemons and puss covered diseased daemons are awesome!" her words, not mine) and one they will enjoy collecting and painting

its definately fulfilling though, bringing a sibling into the game, just takes alot of patience if they're young, because they will get distracted by other things, the key is keeping their interest in the long run

Oglog
09-08-2010, 18:13
, have you played a game with him? Judging this aspect may help you decide better.


yes, but simply, plus I dont have the 8th rulebook. I think the island of blood (if it is like skull pass) will introduce it very well to him.

also, my parents are relaxed and are happy to let him do these things with correct supervision.:)

Draeven
09-08-2010, 18:16
Shouldn't be an issue if the parents are onboard. Just supervise him when needed and bring him along slwoly.

TeddyC
09-08-2010, 18:19
Got my nephew some models as a last minute birthday present so he had something to open as his main thing was out of stock.

Took him to warhammer world to learn how to paint them, which, yea hes ok at painting for an 8 year old, better than I would have thought anyway....

Staffer showed him a very simplified version of the game which he enjoyed, however he still doesnt understand that you need to make armies and they are different to his toy soldiers. I mean he knows they are delicate models and he cant throw them around.

Should be noted this was 40k. I still think he is too young to be gaming and I dont think he really understands the gaming aspects. I really dont think he would understand warhammer at all.

But again, you know the kid, we dont. He might get on just fine

Moopy
09-08-2010, 18:28
If he's showing an interest, has the maturity and attention span, and has already painted models, I say you're good to go.

My brother is 14 and has shown some limited interest in a few card/board games but Warhammer doesn't seem to draw his attention at all. Just depends on the person.

CauCaSus
09-08-2010, 18:53
If he is putting bits into his mouth he is too young

Bloody Nunchucks
09-08-2010, 18:58
My brother is 12 and he started playing at 10, he now has 4k of fully painted IG and 2k of dwarfs. i play more fantasy so he has MORE 40k than i do. i think that your brother would be up for the challenge, just get him into painting so he doesnt end up like me and have 7k of unpainted models vs 3k painted

TMATK
09-08-2010, 19:21
Don't underestimate how dangerous an Xacto knife is. I know a kid who almost took his finger off cutting mounting board when I was in college.

Clear it with Mom and Dad for sure. You may need to clean his mold lines for him.

Korraz
09-08-2010, 19:22
12. Minimum. Fluff, Violence, Boobs and so on...but really? Because they will annoy the hell out of the older players. It may not be nice, but it's true. I started 14 and was general a pretty calm and silent kid. But even then I annoyed people now and then. It's just the age.
When I finally have some freetime and I want to paint some blood angels and have a nice chat, or a relaxed game, a bunch of 10 year olds jumping around, shouting and bragging how Aragorn would beat up my Clanrats or how Nooby Space Marines are, don't help exactly.

This is by now way meant offensive. I know this is not exclusive to preteens. I know my share of frickin annoying manchilds that are worse than a bunch of kindergardenkids. But some years generally help.

Drakcore Bloodtear
09-08-2010, 19:24
Heck, I've been playing since I was 6 (Or maybe it was 7?)
But patience is the biggest flaw, I see when younger kids want to play.

'Warhammer is not like a video game, it's like chess.'

mrtn
09-08-2010, 19:34
A friend of mine started playing with his son when he was 7. Works great, he's 10 now and have been playing on and off for three years now. This kid is mature and smart, and it sounds like your brother is too, so go for it. :)
If it turns out he doesn't like it then he wouldn't be the first kid with an unused starter set, after all. ;)

starlight
09-08-2010, 19:41
In my experience, age has far less (as in, almost nothing) to do with it than maturity and environment. It sounds like he's okay on both sides, and the release day is a bit away. So in the meantime, pick up a few more models from the armies in the Starter to see if he likes the armies, and if that works go for it. If not, get the mini-book on eBay/etc and pick up a Battalion for an army he does like. :)

goodz
09-08-2010, 19:46
Might want to cut pieces out of his spruces for him! Also might be better off with 40k or warmaster, they have simpler rules in my opinion. (mind you i haven't played much 8th edition). Might be cool to see if he has a friend his age to play with or something.

tdc500
09-08-2010, 19:54
If he is putting bits into his mouth he is too young

I still put bits in my mouth :D *he says with a sword (BFG) in his mouth*

Does that make me to young?

Oglog
09-08-2010, 19:58
thanks very much for all the response. I understand the effort that I would need to put in but I hopw it will be worth it in a few years when he is a veteran gamer! but seriously, I think i should give this a go. If it is apparent that he is uninterested (which i doubt), then the box is not wasted, I can use it (or sell some of it to Finarflin...:)). Also the thing with clipping and trimming, of course I would have to do that, but the start set models seem very easy to assemble (one or two peice snap fit and base to glue together). I will give this a go (only if he wants to). If he wants to spend his money of lego or whatnot, then thats fine with me!

Heimagoblin
09-08-2010, 20:04
I would go for it but don't invest in a large box. My little brother collects 500 points of an amry and then moves on to the next one and whilst not ideal for gaming purposes means he's getting to do a variety of painting which seems to be what he enjoys.

theorox
09-08-2010, 20:09
Good grief, just make him join our ranks already! He should be fine. My 12 year old brother is still not quite grasping the game completely, i wish lol...but then again, we're not english-speaking as a first language. :)

I'd say buy him the box. He'll be happy as heck if he is into the hobby at all, those models are awesome!

Theo

frisbee
09-08-2010, 20:13
Dont' know if this will help.

I am currently working with a friend of mines kid on the warhammer side of things

He picked it up really fast and loves his vampires. I think he is 8-9 and understands the rules very well. Sometimes calling me or my friend out on things we have done wrong.

Sometime thought the bigger battles make him loses interest. That being said we just break it up over two or three day for anything over 4,000 points.

Otherwise most of the players are very kind and don't table him or use foul language around him.

Caiphas Cain
09-08-2010, 20:15
Go for it. If you think he's capable of handling himself responsibly, that that should be good enough. I would wait untill he's 12 or so before bringing him to a GW or a LGS, some "mature" adults can't seem to behave maturely when a younger guy wants to play with them. Just make sure he's having fun! Don't table him on turn three just because you can. The point of the game is to have fun, remember that!

Oglog
09-08-2010, 21:04
okay played a few short pitched battle-style games with him, each with one unit. Firstly we played where I had a unit of men at arms and he had some empire swordsmen and did simple movement and marching. He seemed fairly neutral. Then we had a shoot off (handgunners vs peasants). I explained BS, Toughness and weapon strength and he picked this up well after quite a long explination. Despite my peasants winning (hurraah!), he really enjoyed it! a good start!

lowix
09-08-2010, 22:28
I play with my 7 year old often.
Do small armies. Start with 500 points and work up to 1000. He probably won't have the patience to play longer than an hour, maybe 1.5 hours.
Don’t use mages, and basically remove the magic phase until he gets the game down.
For the first few games, I would have minimal to no shooting as well.
Build fluff armies, with stories, and he’ll like it more. Get rid of any competiveness that you have and make it more of a story. Be loose at the beginning with the rules.
For example: Build an orc/goblin army with a Giant, and a few groups of goblins, with a plain goblin hero as the leader. Then give him a few blocks of swordmasters with a hero. The story is that the bad goblins got a giant to come attack his good guys.

undeadyotsuba
09-08-2010, 22:30
I still put bits in my mouth :D *he says with a sword (BFG) in his mouth*

Does that make me to young?

Naaah your just like me :D Except I drool alot...
But if he has the maturity to be around people that are older then him then it's fine! I would even say it's healthy because most warhammer players I've met are the best people I've ever gotten to know and some of the are close friends of mine ^^
And remeber Warhammer is not a game...It's a lifestyle!

Bodysnatcher
09-08-2010, 22:36
My brother started second ed 40K at 8. 8th edition Fantasy should be a cakewalk in comparison.

Wakerofgods
09-08-2010, 23:36
Whenever he wants to is old enough.

Taking him to the local club is a different story though...

Hachiman
10-08-2010, 08:18
Buy him a small number of models (find out which ones he really likes best though) help him assemble and paint them, and play small skirmishes. Let him win a few though!

Lord of Divine Slaughter
10-08-2010, 08:34
So you want to introduce your brother to a hobby sure to bring financial ruin and a social stigma to his teen years? Thats harsh! :evilgrin:

-

On a more serious note, expect it to be your responsibility to meet his gaming 'needs'. If you want to bring him to your LGS, then play team battles etc., as mpst geeks would be rather reluctant to play with an 8-year old. But beyond that just go ahead, if the kid has the patience for the hobby aspect and enjoys that part, the worst thing that can happen is that you'll get yourself an assistant painter ;)

Besides that, you're his 'cool' older brother, so he'd be dying just to spend time with you and doing 'cool' older brother stuff and stuff :)

Waagghh_Logan
10-08-2010, 09:42
i started with the Skull Pass set when i was 9 or 10 and i think your all right about the patience thing.

My dad built most of the models for me but i was able to paint them to a reasonable standard.

Also, i think your best bet is to get IoB because those armies are a perfect size for kids of that age.

But be careful not to let out all your knowledege, or you'll never forgive yourself when he starts winning :D !!

Hachiman
10-08-2010, 10:00
It would be awesome to train him up, send him into GW posing as a noob, and pwn the staff there! :D

Oglog
10-08-2010, 10:22
It would be awesome to train him up, send him into GW posing as a noob, and pwn the staff there! :D


ah damn you! my evil plan has been uncovered:evilgrin:

Lordsaradain
10-08-2010, 12:03
( is too young IMO. 10-12 is proably better, I'd say 12.

No-One
10-08-2010, 13:28
just wanted to throw this in here as a sidenote since people are bringing up the age + LGS, and how they might not be compatible(depending on the kid, i can agree)

as i mentioned before, my little sister has a slaanesh/nurgle daemons army, yesterday, we went to our normal monday gamer night, and a new guy was there, it appears that my little sister(age 13) is far more of a member of our gaming club than i had first though because i was outside smoking a cigerette, and the new guy(mid 20s, i'd say 26) and my little sister had some sort of arguement over rules, my sister was correct, he was incorrect, and he got angry and called her a prissy little word-that-rhymes-with-twit, which led to Big Mac(age 28, big burly chewbacca looking bloke) putting him in a choke hold and making him apologise to "our badass little sister", i came back into the shop after my smoke just as the new guy was leaving angry and was told the story, i dont think i've ever been more proud, and she was just sitting there nonchalant, setting up her army for her next game

so while some of the younger players can tend to annoy the older gamers, if they're mature(as my sister is) then they become just another member of the family

doomscape
10-08-2010, 13:34
Careful on this one mate. I used to teach folks how to play Warhammer Fantasy more competitively at our FLGS, and one day this mom and her 12 year old daughter walk in and watch me give a lesson. At the end the mom comes up to me and said, "My daughter would like to learn how to play" and six months later no one in the store could beat her. Turns out she was an honest-to-goodness wargaming prodigy.

Just a warning that you may be bringing about the rise of the next Napoleon ;)

~PrometheuS~
10-08-2010, 13:52
Slaughter him in a game, if he takes it well, he should be right, if he hand of gods the models, he not ready, LMAO

covenant
10-08-2010, 14:02
I have a 10 and a 7 year old. The difference is quite palpable, the 10 year old ( started playing when he was 9 ) loves itůand he is very comfortable with the rules. The 7 year old doesn't really have the attention span for anything more than a 500-600 point game.

As someone who came back to wargaming ( old 3rd Edition player ) after a LONG break, we relearned the rules together..and of course now being a wage earning adultůI have so much more money to spendůso the learning, playing , assembling and painting experience has been good quality time with them.

I guess its all about the individual child though. I think some of the threads on here are spot on..start small and see how they like it. There is nothing worse than trying to force kids to enjoy a game that they just aren't interested inů

-Covenant.

CaptainFaramir
10-08-2010, 15:32
I'm an only child. I was bought the 4th Ed. box set for my 7th Christmas. I used to paint in my room on my own, happily cutting goblins and high elf spearmen off set sprues. Using my dad's Swiss Army knife to remove mold lines, and using my dad's acrylic paints and white spirit to clean the brush!! Totally unsupervised in my room!

I cut myself and I spilt paint on the carpet (no amount of white spirit got THAT stain out!) and I glued my fingers together... I didn't die, or poison myself, or cut off my hands. For every idiot, who has a scare-story there are 99 normal little boys who can manage not to be a spaz for ten minutes at a time!

Basically, chill out. He's eight! He's not THREE. He's not going to choke on small parts, and so long as you only stick to plastic glue (puntastic!) I can't see a problem, especially with the non-toxic paints....

Hang on. I'm already falling into my own trap! He's EIGHT! He's not a toddler. He probably has his eye on some chick, and is working out where the best place to bum a fag is*, or when he can get his driver's licence. Exagerration - but this is real life. Just left him have fun.

(*Note for our American friends. "Bum" means to ask for without paying. "Fag" means cigarette. This is a family forum.)

Finarflin
10-08-2010, 17:44
:eek: Oh no!: not only will I have to tend with a tactically superior and better painter than me in the form of Oglog, but I must now contented with his evil minion. I am doomed! DOOOOMED!!! :D

I haven't spent too much time with your brother, but from what I've seen I'm sure he is intelligent to grasp the majority of the rules very quickly. If he is still interested he will probably be beating us both soon, even when we work together! My suggestions would be for him to join in some battles with us once he has the basics under his belt and a few tactics in mind, giving him the control of part of your army. I would agree with Iowix, perhaps not including magic rules. Of course I am just basing this on what I know of him and what I liked at his age.

L1qw1d
10-08-2010, 18:29
Aside from inappropriate comments that would be funny to put in, I usually say "If they can cry, they can't play".

There are 40 year olds that I know who can't play...

Oglog
10-08-2010, 19:17
[QUOTE=L1qw1d;4900681]"If they can cry, they can't play"[QUOTE]

The only time my brother cries is when he is physically hurt (in fact this is rather frequent). Apart form that, he never cries from losing, being insulted etc.

Chain
10-08-2010, 19:24
Well have them old enough to read the rules helps a lot

Another thing is how patient is the kid?

Finally are they very bad losers?


Ususally i'd suggest 10+ for playing the game, a little less for painting



Edit


Well sounds like it's worth trying to get him into it, try 500 points battles

perhaps play with your army maybe split in 2 and try it a few times if he love the game then buy him some

Haravikk
10-08-2010, 19:49
Few kids around the 9 year old mark in my local store today, and they seemed to be doing okay at it. Though one wasn't pleased with the huge number of bad dice rolls he was getting he still seemed to have fun.

R3pr3ssor
11-08-2010, 01:20
I think he would be fine. Don't let him go to games night at the store until he is 10 though, as little kids can be the worst opponents.

at my local g-dub there are several 11-12 year old brats who play smurfs and orks. they are convinced they are in the right no matter what, I have literally massacred several of their 2k armies with my casual 1k tzeentch marines(they all either cheat horribly or are mathematically inept), and they talk about things like "deep stwiking my land waider for gweater tactical advantage" (the w's are not a mistake). their armies are mixes of unpainted models and those that look like expressionist splatter art, and they are generally some of the most annoying people I know.

at the same time there are 2 10 year old boys who play goblins and dwarves (they bought skull pass together, and shared the contents), painted their armies to the best of their abilities, and are some of the nicest kids I have ever met.

the bottom line is, If your brother is modest and willing to learn, he will do fine at warhammer.

Jetty Smurf
11-08-2010, 07:28
Few kids around the 9 year old mark in my local store today, and they seemed to be doing okay at it. Though one wasn't pleased with the huge number of bad dice rolls he was getting he still seemed to have fun.

Haha, sounds like our gaming group (with regards to bad dice rolls equaling sad faces).

I remember when I was first introduced to 40k. I was 11, and the models were cool, I had no problems with cutting them out, cleaning mold lines, and assembling them. I never cut myself deep enough to bleed or anything like that. Didn't have issues with glue (seem to have more issues these days, tbh :rolleyes:).

What I did have problems with were the rules. I never had a firm grasp of the rules before I changed schools (and thus moved away from the friend that got me into 40k in the first place) and lost interest.

Even now, with 8th edition (got re-introduced to WH via fantasy in 7th), I'm by no means perfect with the rules, but I can still play a game without issues.

What I'm saying here is, it sounds like he should be more than fine with all the hobby aspects of the game, and should be ok playing, but may need some help with the rules, as to be expected. I don't work with kids at all, but have been around them enough to know that some are definitely capable of more complex thinking (which in all honesty, is required in this game, regardless of the endless comments about 8th ed being so simplified).

Worst case scenario, he'll have some nice models on his shelves growing up which will add some flavour to his bedroom. :p

Blaqkheart
11-08-2010, 08:50
I started playing when I was 10(now 19) and I can vaguely remember back then. I know I caught on to the rules quickly and army building as well, but painting was something I didnt have much of a clue about so my mom paid a local guy to paint my stuff for me. Playing in tournaments as a kid I was calm and always kept my mouth shut. I knew that as a younger player I would probably misinterpret rules, so when the older guys told me something my instant reaction was to listen and take note of what was being said, so that I could retain all knowledge of the rules for future purposes. Being 10 I had a hard time being patient when building Necrons, if it wasnt for bits I would have had many broken guns. I also remember me not fitting my monolith together very well, but everything looked decent. I switched to Eldar later on and by that age I had assembling down, but painting was a disaster still. I didnt start getting interested in fantasy until many years after that. As long as he understands he will not win every game and he knows how to be a good sport, everything should be fine. I recall a time when I was in the top 3 of a tournament and for the final game they just decided to do a 3 way battle. I was playing Necrons and I had two monoliths, so I expected to be the main target. I was going up against Blood Angels and Space Wolves. I knew they were going to forgo each other and come straight after me, and I was okay with it. I accepted getting beaten very badly and ganged up on and just had fun. Having fun is most important. Anyways, enough of my 4 am ranting, I hope he gets into the hobby!

Haravikk
11-08-2010, 11:29
What I did have problems with were the rules.
Heh, I started playing 40k under edition 2, what a nightmare to learn! I think in that respect 8th edition fantasy is a bit easier going though it can still be a bit tricky.

In the case I saw yesterday the young boy was playing High Elves from the Island of Blood starter set, which should be an instant advantage with their much better basic list vs the Skaven, but with his rolls he ended up with the most underwhelming elite army ever :D
I think he was playing a friend though who was trying to introduce him to the hobby, all seemed well and we might have a new player :)


here [there] are several 11-12 year old brats
Heh, same here, worst is when a snooty one tries to correct you regarding the "High Elf Codex", I had to point out that I'd much prefer to learn the army book instead. The modest ones are fine, but self-absorbed kids are annoying, especially if they call my Fen Beast a troll and think it goes "nom nom", bah! *insert further disgruntled old man at 23 talk here*

Lord of Divine Slaughter
11-08-2010, 12:01
Heh, same here, worst is when a snooty one tries to correct you regarding the "High Elf Codex", I had to point out that I'd much prefer to learn the army book instead. The modest ones are fine, but self-absorbed kids are annoying, especially if they call my Fen Beast a troll and think it goes "nom nom", bah! *insert further disgruntled old man at 23 talk here*

Thing about kids is that if you treat them like snot-nosed brats, they'll behave like snot-nosed brats just to do whats expected of them. They'll quite often do anything to please and be accepted by their 'elders'. By behaving like a snot-nosed brat yourself, you just lose your authority as an elder, and as such just add to the problem.

Hachiman
11-08-2010, 14:50
Careful on this one mate. I used to teach folks how to play Warhammer Fantasy more competitively at our FLGS, and one day this mom and her 12 year old daughter walk in and watch me give a lesson. At the end the mom comes up to me and said, "My daughter would like to learn how to play" and six months later no one in the store could beat her. Turns out she was an honest-to-goodness wargaming prodigy.

Just a warning that you may be bringing about the rise of the next Napoleon ;)

That sounds soo awesome! Send her to Glasgow, I'd love to see her destroy some of the players here! :D :D

Leggo1927
11-08-2010, 17:25
Seems to me you have already made your mind up. I'm sure if your as patient as your brother, things will be fine. I know I tried to get mine into GW and there was no spark of interest there at all, so your at least one step further along than me. Even if he's not ultimately into the gaming aspect, he might dig the hobby side (or vice versa,) so your gift wouldn't goto waste either way.

LonelyPath
11-08-2010, 21:41
I was about 10 when I first started with WFB 2nd edition (a very long time ago) and it took a while, but myself and some friends got the hang of the rules. Just take it a step at a time and once they get the basics down, start introducing some of the more advanced/complex stuff.

Orcboy_Phil
12-08-2010, 06:12
just wanted to throw this in here as a sidenote since people are bringing up the age + LGS, and how they might not be compatible(depending on the kid, i can agree)

as i mentioned before, my little sister has a slaanesh/nurgle daemons army, yesterday, we went to our normal monday gamer night, and a new guy was there, it appears that my little sister(age 13) is far more of a member of our gaming club than i had first though because i was outside smoking a cigerette, and the new guy(mid 20s, i'd say 26) and my little sister had some sort of arguement over rules, my sister was correct, he was incorrect, and he got angry and called her a prissy little word-that-rhymes-with-twit, which led to Big Mac(age 28, big burly chewbacca looking bloke) putting him in a choke hold and making him apologise to "our badass little sister", i came back into the shop after my smoke just as the new guy was leaving angry and was told the story, i dont think i've ever been more proud, and she was just sitting there nonchalant, setting up her army for her next game

so while some of the younger players can tend to annoy the older gamers, if they're mature(as my sister is) then they become just another member of the family

Generally, I think this is the male protection urge. I would have done more or less the same thing in Big Mac's position.

Elfboy
12-08-2010, 11:28
It sounds like he would be fine to start playing, collecting etc. if he's already patient, easy going and enjoys the painting.

However, I wouldn't buy him the IoB boxset for his birthday (if that's what you were planning to do, :) it seemed implied in the first post) simply because it would be a present for you as well as him. You could get your own IoB set and let him get involved, let him have the skaven if you like. For his birthday present you could get him something separate, or maybe even non-warhammer related!

Sorry for the preaching! :p

Zilverug
12-08-2010, 14:15
I intend to donate all my beastmen (all of them unpainted) to my son when he shows enough interest in them, which might still take some years (which gives GW ample time to provide a decent army book *grumble*). By the way, my son is 7 now (in weeks).

GameSetJohn
12-08-2010, 18:17
Although 8 does sound quite young to start such a complex hobby, you appear to be a serious and mature enough person to help guide him through it. I'd echo what others have said that you should have the introduction be gradual, to help avoid frustration and confusion.

Ramius4
12-08-2010, 18:47
If she's not old enough to drink, stay away:p

Luisjoey
12-08-2010, 21:32
the more players the merrier!

try to play with him to see if he shows more interest, do not push him into playing.

maybe in a future he could start to play his own army.

Coragus
15-08-2010, 21:23
Last night, I set up a Dwarf vs. WoC battle on a table in the living room. My 6 year old son asked if he could play. I asked what he wanted and he picked the Dwarfs. I moved the models for him, but I let him make every decision on what every unit did, after explaining what each unit could do. I also let him roll all of his own dice, telling him why he was rolling each time and what he needed. We got through 4 turns before it was late and we both went to bed.

I guess it can be done to a point. I wouldn't buy him his own box set for Christmas or anything, nor does he get to paint unsupervised. He certainly doesn't understand the nuances of the rules. Even so, it was great fun and exciting to see him so excited.

By the way, the Warriors won!

mrtn
16-08-2010, 01:07
Last night, I set up a Dwarf vs. WoC battle on a table in the living room. My 6 year old son asked if he could play. I asked what he wanted and he picked the Dwarfs.
...
By the way, the Warriors won!
You beat a six year old and are proud? :p

Nah, just kidding, it's great that you can play with your son. :) :yes:

ftayl5
16-08-2010, 06:39
Age isn't really the matter. It's not like drinking, you MUST be 18 +. If your mature enough to play Warhammer, you can.

A 10 year old, I'd say, generally wouldn't be, but who knows.

Gatsby
16-08-2010, 08:15
this thread title is SO wrong.....

Unwise
16-08-2010, 08:24
In my experience kids around that age (8, responding to OP) either don't have the patience (or frankly intellect) to learn the game or they get obsessed about it. Some of the imaginative themes are a little too much for many young kids to process and they go overboard becoming obsessed with the hobby.

Some of the most mature kids I have known have really lost their minds over warhammer and had to be reelled in as they just kept talking about it, drawing disturbing chaos pictures all the time etc. In a school environment, they were becoming 'that kid'.

wizbix
16-08-2010, 08:30
Beethoven have his first public show at the age of seven so all things are possible, do not listen to those that would say they don't have the intelectual aptitude at that age as it is individual. My step seven year old helps me out a lot though I havent gone as far as spending money on models for her just yet. She wants High Elves all for her self. I will get some in a year or so. Usually she helps with scenery making. I dont think she yet has the patients to play though. I would however caution the use of Knives and super glue at such a young age no matter how mature he/she appears to be. You could help out with those aspects though.

Alric
16-08-2010, 08:32
If he is putting bits into his mouth he is too young


I still put bits in my mouth :D *he says with a sword (BFG) in his mouth*

Does that make me to young?

How , true , I say the same if hes not trying to eat them or use them for target practice on the walls he should be ok.


this thread title is SO wrong.....

Ya , ya , we werent going to say anything :angel:

wizbix
16-08-2010, 08:34
Surely at the age of 7 kids are well past the stage of putting items in to their mouths??? Generally they stop doing this by the age of 3.

Oglog
16-08-2010, 08:49
this thread title is SO wrong.....


then you're clearly too young and not mature enough to play warhammer, drink or do whatever was suggested by
SO wrong.....

:) jokes!

Gatsby
16-08-2010, 08:51
How , true , I say the same if hes not trying to eat them or use them for target practice on the walls he should be ok.

dreads aren't as tough as people say they are, i shot one with a 9mm and it just blew apart.

phoenixguard09
16-08-2010, 10:36
Both me and my sister started at 9 and my brother is 6 and already has a 2500 O&G army and is considering Skaven with Island of Blood.

My sister has been playing for 4 years now and has 3500 Dark Elves, 2000 Wood Elves and has even finished writing her own army book.

Personally I find the younger the better. If you get in early then they think it perfectly normal to play when they're younger. With impressionable young kids it means that , in this case my sister's, friends start to play as well. Gives my sister more practice and playing at school is improving her ability because of trying to fit a 1500 pt game into a 45 minute lunch break.

So yes, to the OP do try and convince your brother to play. Don't push him but jump at any chance you get.

BTW stress the spirit of the game point. Advise against unwise moves etc. Oh and remember to tell him something like, "Always shake hands and say good game or something like it at the end." Don't want to breed overcompetative scumbags do we? :D