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Lord Setra
30-05-2005, 15:13
Did anyone catch this Grand prix.

I thought that this Grand Prix was one of the better races of the season. There seemed to be much more action.

Coulthard was on form rising from 12th on the grid to 4th in the first corner, even though he could have won a place on the podium, he screwed it up by speeding in the pits. All fairness to him though he did still finish 4th.

I think that the best bit of the race had to be Alonso bearing down on Raiknonen, who eventuall suffered a serious suspension failure because his tyres were like 50p- for those who are not british octagons :p

All in all a great race and one which I found to be worth giving my attention to.

What did you guys think of it?

nevermore
30-05-2005, 15:14
who won?

They should show more racing on Tv, especially that naascar stuff! ;)

Lord Setra
30-05-2005, 15:19
Alonso won after catching up with Raiknonen on the final lap.

Delicious Soy
30-05-2005, 15:23
I thought it funny that Williams had apparently been working on their starts. Not hard enough apparently. It was only a matter of time before one of them had a first turn accident like Webber did, they take forever to get off the mark.

Lord Setra
30-05-2005, 15:24
Yeah I did notice the really slow start. Coulthard made the most of the first turn incident as did the other Red bull racer, Luizi.

alterion
30-05-2005, 18:44
wo i may have to watch grand prix racing again.. i switched off sometime last yeaqr as it became apparnt the shumacer ( or however you spell it) with full kudos too him won every single thing.. but you mean he don't do this anymore?

f2k
30-05-2005, 18:52
It sure was an interesting race.

I feel very sorry for Raikonen. Less than a lap left and then his suspension explodes. I was watching the race with a friend, and the last 10 – 12 laps we were just waiting for it to happen.
I think this illustrates how flawed the new rules are. Sure, this has been one of the more interesting seasons. Not the least because Ferrari seems to have lost it completely, but also due to tire issues. It’s just a matter of time before someone has a bad accident, I think. Racecars of this caliber need fresh tires.
F1’s governing bodies really needs to sit down and think this through…

On a, somewhat, related note: what do you think of Ferrari? Not only does their car seem somewhat, umm – lacking, but their race strategy seemed all wrong.
Why did they send Rubens out on a 3-stop strategy? Had they put a bit more fuel into his car at the second pit-stop, he could have been number 2 rather than 3.

Hercco
30-05-2005, 20:12
I was watching the race at my parents house with my dad. I believe we both used every possible swear word in finnish language (and there are many...) after what happened on the last lap.

Lord Setra
30-05-2005, 21:55
I really didnt feel anything for Raiknonen. He could have pitted and still came a respectable third. I mean it was his fault that he kept locking his tyres up and going off the race track.

On Schumacher and Ferrari. I have been pleasently shocked by the crapness of the team. Not only has this allowed other members of the F1 to shine such as Alonso and Raikonen but it has shown everyone that schumacher is not unbeatable and that really it depends on the car he drives. Not him

f2k
30-05-2005, 22:03
Why should he pit? He would still not have been allowed to change tires…

I do agree with you on the driver-error, though. It was his own fault that he got a flat-spot.

Arnizipal
30-05-2005, 22:03
I really didnt feel anything for Raiknonen. He could have pitted and still came a respectable third. I mean it was his fault that he kept locking his tyres up and going off the race track.
Although i like Alonso and I think it's nice to se an different team at the top, I think McLaren could really use a break after these last tough years of bad luck.
Stuff like this just keeps on happening to them.

Lord Setra
30-05-2005, 22:06
Yes it is true that the bad side of luck does seem to favour McLaren but you would think that a team with such expertise would have the sense to pull its driver in to protect him, the car and the other racers. And perhaps also his lead in the world championship.

Lord Setra
30-05-2005, 22:08
Why should he pit? He would still not have been allowed to change tires…

I do agree with you on the driver-error, though. It was his own fault that he got a flat-spot.

In the F1 rules you are allowed to change you tyres if it is perceived that the tyres may in a few laps fail or cause damage to the car. As these tyres were.

Wez
30-05-2005, 22:20
On Schumacher and Ferrari. I have been pleasently shocked by the crapness of the team. Not only has this allowed other members of the F1 to shine such as Alonso and Raikonen but it has shown everyone that schumacher is not unbeatable and that really it depends on the car he drives. Not him

Schumacher is good in races. He can race and he's good at that. He's just god-awful at qualifying and finishing. When he does qualify well, he then retires.

Compare where Alonso starts and then finishes. Then compare where Shumacher starts and finishes.

Certainly much of Schumi's previous success is down to the car, but now it's his inability to a) finish a race and b) qualify well, that's stopping him.


Yes it is true that the bad side of luck does seem to favour McLaren but you would think that a team with such expertise would have the sense to pull its driver in to protect him, the car and the other racers. And perhaps also his lead in the world championship.

Staying out was the right thing to do imo. He needs to catch up on Alonso. Yes, he did pay for the price of the gamble, but had he not done it, he'd have just given Alonso a greater lead (although this did backfire, unfortunately). I stand by his decision.

-Wez

Lord Setra
31-05-2005, 18:06
I understand what you are saying and I agree that it was a gamble that raikonen seen as one worth taking. I just believe that if he had went in to the pits, his chances of staying closer to alonsos lead in world championship was greatly increased.

Snoozer
31-05-2005, 18:35
I just hope this season will go good for Mclaren, last season Räikkönen finnished the race like twice (his car always blew up or it didn't even start).

But I't seems that Räikkönen has hade some better luck this season... not counting the last race of course :(

:D

f2k
31-05-2005, 19:04
In the F1 rules you are allowed to change you tyres if it is perceived that the tyres may in a few laps fail or cause damage to the car. As these tyres were.

I wonder if Raikonen was actually aware of the seriousness of the situation. The tire, in itself, did not look particularly damaged – apart from the flat-spot that is.

Does the onboard telemetry measure vibration-levels in the suspension?

If the team was aware of the vibrations and the danger it posed to the car, then it was foolhardy, and almost criminally so, to let him continue. Forget about the points – they are not worth dying for…

Wintermute
31-05-2005, 19:26
I wonder if Raikonen was actually aware of the seriousness of the situation. The tire, in itself, did not look particularly damaged – apart from the flat-spot that is.

Does the onboard telemetry measure vibration-levels in the suspension?

If the team was aware of the vibrations and the danger it posed to the car, then it was foolhardy, and almost criminally so, to let him continue. Forget about the points – they are not worth dying for…

I think Kimi and the team were well aware of the severity of the vibration problem caused by the flat spot on the tyre. They obviously thought the suspension would last long enough for Kimi to finish and win the race. I do not think for one second McLaren thought a catastrophic failure would occur pitchiing Kimi of the circuit in the barriers at high speed.

The team may have been concerned that if they bought Kimi in to change the tyre they may have been contravening the rules governing tyre changes.

The rules regrading tyre need urgent review and clarification before there is a more serious accident or a fatality due to tyre wear.

Kargos Bloodspit
31-05-2005, 22:16
I really didnt feel anything for Raiknonen. He could have pitted and still came a respectable third. I mean it was his fault that he kept locking his tyres up and going off the race track.

But when its getting to this kind of lead on Alonso. Raikonnen HAD to do everything he could to get points back on him. If the suspension had lasted the race. I reckon he would've been able to hog the road so much as to stop Alonso getting by.

santiholgado
01-06-2005, 09:34
I wonder if Raikonen was actually aware of the seriousness of the situation. The tire, in itself, did not look particularly damaged – apart from the flat-spot that is.

Does the onboard telemetry measure vibration-levels in the suspension?

If the team was aware of the vibrations and the danger it posed to the car, then it was foolhardy, and almost criminally so, to let him continue. Forget about the points – they are not worth dying for…

Like Wintermute said, Kimi must have been pretty aware of the situation. McLaren's test driver, Pedro Martinez de la Rosa, comments the race for the spanish TV. He made clear a couple of times that with that tyre Kimi must be experiencing such unstability he should be having problems keeping the track in eye. I think there was also a tiem where they showed Kimi's camera and the images were "shaking".

While you may or may not disagree with the new rules:
- McLaren took benefit from them in the 2 previous races where Alonso experienced tyre problems. In other races, other drivers had problems and nobody said nothing.
- They could have changed the tyre (and get a third position and 6 points), or slow down a little (and probably finishing second and getting 8 points). Instead, they took an "all or nothing" strategy.

santiholgado
01-06-2005, 09:37
I reckon he would've been able to hog the road so much as to stop Alonso getting by.

Same as Alonso did in Italy with Schumacher for 12 laps...

Sai-Lauren
01-06-2005, 10:34
They could have changed the tyre (and get a third position and 6 points), or slow down a little (and probably finishing second and getting 8 points). Instead, they took an "all or nothing" strategy.

And if the FIA then ruled that the tire was perfectly alright and he shouldn't have changed it (IIRC, the new rules only refer to the tire, and not damage to the rest of the car), he'd have been disqualified. And then the lawyers get involved. :rolleyes:

Even if he had changed the tire or slowed down, he'd already damaged the suspension to the point where it would have failed anyway, all those two options do is possibly move the accident to somewhere a lot more dangerous than where it did happen. At least there he had plenty of space to run off. What would have happened if he'd had the same problems at say Monaco or Indianapolis, where on a lot of the circuit there's no space between the track and a very big wall?

But it was good to see Coulthard do so well, especially after Schumacher rammed him last week in Monaco.