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View Full Version : Still gotta get my "fix"....



Tarliyn
02-08-2011, 20:20
So I just moved and no longer have a warhammer outlet. Since moving I have found myself craving a warhammer outlet, lol. I have been buying white dwarfs, reading battle reports, and I even bought a time of legends book. None of those things are bad I just found it funny I startrd doing all these things in order to get my "fix" lol.

Anyone else encounter probelms with thier addiction upon moving? lol

Moopy
03-08-2011, 02:55
I live in southern california and find the Fantasy enthusiasm lacking - I know plenty of people who play 40k and Hordes/Warmachines etc though but no Fantasy.

My recommendation is to listen to podcasts lol. Good luck!

Tarliyn
03-08-2011, 03:14
yeah its the same here, a couple 40k players who are willing to play every so often but thats not the same a having another fantasy player around to do post game talk with, get excited about new releases with, and discuss fluff stuff with.

I will try out podcasts, lol. Any you recommend?

Moopy
03-08-2011, 17:56
It depends on your sense of humor but I dig pointhammered, garagehammer, the black sun, and heelan hammer. There's definitely more, but none I'd recommend over those.

If you have a boring office job like me you can definitely keep up to date on just about every podcast. I usually drift in and out of paying attention while I work.

Malorian
03-08-2011, 18:01
If you want more fantasy interest then generate the interest your self.

Teach the game to new players, arrange gaming nights, arrange tournaments, arrange campaigns.

It's not always up to others to make this happen for you.

Moopy
03-08-2011, 18:10
If you want more fantasy interest then generate the interest your self.

Teach the game to new players, arrange gaming nights, arrange tournaments, arrange campaigns.

It's not always up to others to make this happen for you.

Can't speak for the OP but it's hard to generate interest in something so niche, tedious, and expensive in people who don't already play.

I've met about 5 people this year that developed a passing interest in fantasy and got over it after seeing what it would cost for them to get started. This may be a topic for another thread but I would LOVE to see Games Workshop realize the potential in hooking new players by selling 500 point starter packs, even if they could only cover a select number of armies.

The mix of models in Battalions isn't always optimal and they're expensive to boot.

The counter argument to that is that there's ways around the cost, and it's true - I've arranged gaming nights for groups of friends who wanted to play but didn't want to invest in models so they just used plastic bases and paper, but the hobby aspect and the cost just isn't for everyone.

Malorian
03-08-2011, 18:17
This may be a topic for another thread but I would LOVE to see Games Workshop realize the potential in hooking new players by selling 500 point starter packs, even if they could only cover a select number of armies.

That's why they have a starter set ;)

That's the inexpensive pay for new players to get into the hobby, not to mention ebay.


I also thing you are pushing "niche, tedious" when gamesworkshop is the leading table top wargame company and starter games can be played in 30 minutes.


This is just a topic that has me on edge as I hear it a lot and it never seems to come to peoples minds that their hobby might just happen to depend on what THEY do and not what OTHERS do for them.

Alathir
03-08-2011, 18:40
That's why they have a starter set ;)

That's the inexpensive pay for new players to get into the hobby, not to mention ebay.


I also thing you are pushing "niche, tedious" when gamesworkshop is the leading table top wargame company and starter games can be played in 30 minutes.


This is just a topic that has me on edge as I hear it a lot and it never seems to come to peoples minds that their hobby might just happen to depend on what THEY do and not what OTHERS do for them.

I agree with you to an extent, but rallying such support is time-consuming, no matter how you look at it and can be very draining if it's simply not to be found. Also, not everyone has the time to do this kind of thing - which I think is the main obstacle.

Andy p
03-08-2011, 19:12
I must admit, my staunch refusal to play 40k simply because it doesnt interest me, seems to have had an effect and at my local club people are now blowing the dust off their fantasy armies.

However, getting enthusiasm and support is hard work. However a lot of good things are. :D /end of cheesy cliche line.

spikedog
03-08-2011, 19:32
While I was stuck at my last job I had no time really to play and used to listen to Podhammer and read a lot of Warseer in order to get my fix.

However now I find myself in the opposite position, I now have a place to play that pretty much only plays Fantasy and I can get a game pretty much any time, any day. Sorry didn't mean to rub that in there :P

Moopy
03-08-2011, 22:48
That's why they have a starter set ;)

That's the inexpensive pay for new players to get into the hobby, not to mention ebay.


I also thing you are pushing "niche, tedious" when gamesworkshop is the leading table top wargame company and starter games can be played in 30 minutes.


This is just a topic that has me on edge as I hear it a lot and it never seems to come to peoples minds that their hobby might just happen to depend on what THEY do and not what OTHERS do for them.

The starter set is 100 dollars which is a pretty firm investment to a new player who may simply be curious about the game and hobby - assuming they even WANT to play Skaven or High Elves.

My musing was more about how much easier it would be to drum up interest and entice new players if Games Workshop sold roughly 500 point warband army sets for each army at a more reasonable $40-50. If these were an option the 5 co-workers who asked me about Warhammer earlier this year (I work for a very nerdy company and have nerdy co-workers) would have been down to check it out.

And while Games Workshop may be a multimillion dollar corporation and be the world's largest producer of the world's most well-made miniatures, be realistic - miniature war gaming IS a niche, tedious, obscure hobby. It's not an insult, it's not putting down the hobby or game (which I thoroughly enjoy), but it's true. GW shouldn't expect to stand there arms wide open while new players flock to them hurling gobs of cash, they should be working towards their games not being cost-prohibitive the same way privateer press does.

Malorian
03-08-2011, 23:14
Since you would be splitting it, the starter set is actually $50. (Interestingly exactly the same as a Hordes or Warmachine starter.)

Dragonreaver
04-08-2011, 00:33
Provided you can find someone to split it with. Let's face it, High Elves and Skaven are two of many armies in the Warhammer World (it's the same for any starter set, even Empire vs. Chaos or Dwarfs vs. Orcs and Goblins.

I agree with your general points, but I can also see where Moopy is coming from. If you have a guy who "thinks" he "might" be interested in the hobby, the starter set is basically forcing him to start collecting High Elves or Skaven. Furthermore, it's asking him to find someone else who's also starting out (or has an existing HE/Skaven army) to buy those models off him.

The starter kit is amazing if you have an interest in the armies within it. My girlfriend was delighted when she found out High Elves were in the starter kit for 8th ed. (not sure what she did with the Skaven _), but if you took a look around the store, chatted to the staff, and decided that you really like Lizardmen... the Isle of Blood isn't really an option then, is it?

As a standalone introduction to a game you know nothing about, GW's starter boxes are fantastic. But there's no real reason, in this day and age, to go into the hobby not knowing anything about it.

I've recruited several friends into the hobby, and I've found that the best way to do it is to get them interested in an army, rather than the game as a whole.

Run through how the game works: team up with another friend and run a 500pt intro game between your army and your existing gamer friend's army, make sure it's balanced and has an equal emphasis on all the phases (so Dwarfs or VC aren't ideal...).

Have newbie watch it. Let newbie ask questions. Maybe after the first turn let him control your army.

Then ask him what he thinks. What he likes about fantasy, what he doesn't like. Direct him towards an army based on that. Does he want to be "good" or "evil"? Is he interested in the more human/historical/realistic armies (Empire, Brettonia, Dwarfs), or the more fantastical ones (Lizardmen, Daemons, Wood Elves, VC, magic-heavy HE).

GW can, and do (damn well, in my LGS) do this too. But at the end of the day, the prospective player is still going to have to WANT to buy this stuff, and paint (or at least assemble) his army. Or be rich enough to pay someone else to do it.

At the end of the day, this hobby IS expensive when you're starting out. Going from nthing at all to a 2,000pt army + necessary paraphernalia (books, dice, etc) is going to cost you a considerable amount of money. End of. Is it worth it? In my opinion, yes. But that's not going to be everyone's opinion, and people will have to just get used to that, tbh.

You can make arguments like "if you saved all the money you spent on alcohol every month, you could buy X points of models and have change to spare" or "if you spent your money on Warhammer instead of video games, you'd have an army really quickly". But the point is, from a new player's point of view, they're going to have to go without something to play Warhammer.

Because it's not just a game, like Call of Duty or Monopoly (or even D&D), it's a hobby.

Malorian
04-08-2011, 00:41
Over the years I have gotten many people to start playing the game. In fact my first gaming group came together because I taught each and every one of them.

Step 1: Let them use your models as you run a demo game.

Step 2: If they like it encourage them to start getting their own models. If they are still unsure then run another demo game.

Step 3: Done!


Don't put it in their mind that they need to go from 0 to 2000 points in one go. Hell, that's why GW stores push 1000 point games (well one reason) is because it's a good number to aim for.

You can even start with a simple 400 point combat patrol, and then month by month, unit by unit, they can increase.


Either way you can't expect your friends to start your hobby out of the blue without some work on your part.

Dragonreaver
04-08-2011, 00:43
Well yes, totally agreed there. I wasn't saying you should encourage them to aim for 2,000pts right off the bat. Just using that as the most common size of game for Fantasy (used to be, anyway).

Tarliyn
04-08-2011, 05:18
If you want more fantasy interest then generate the interest your self.

Teach the game to new players, arrange gaming nights, arrange tournaments, arrange campaigns.

It's not always up to others to make this happen for you.

I actually completely agree with that assessment. When I moved for college I did just that. I got my equally has nerdy friends into the hobby and converted some magic players simply by showing them the rules, letting them use my armies, and helping them out. Basically there was about 5 or 6 of us that did kind of an army swap. We each had different armies and whenever someone wanted to play something new or different we would say switch.

There are a few problems with doing this where I am at now. 1) I work 50 hour weeks. Makes it really hard on its own but when combined with 2) No game store in town. The 40k players that are around meet at a hobby and framing store that is owned by one of the guys friends right now. The store carries warhammer stuff because they asked him to. The 40k guys are great but like I was saying, having a fantasy player around and having someone to play fantasy with are two different things. If I just wanted to have someone to play with I could get my girlfriend to play a game with me once a month. I want someone to be a nerd with though, lol. There really is not just a place to drop in and say "Hey wanna learn this?". Onto 4) It is hard to just meet people, let alone meet people and then convert them into gamers lol.

The price entry point isn't even the issue for me yet, I don't have anyone to pitch a game to besides the 40k players, who while great guys, aren't really that interested.

But this as gotten partially derailed. I wasn't necessarily complaining about not having a group I just thought my reaction to it was funny and I wondered if anyone else had similar experiences.

I am diff looking up those podcasts tonight though :D

shelfunit.
04-08-2011, 07:47
Since you would be splitting it, the starter set is actually $50. (Interestingly exactly the same as a Hordes or Warmachine starter.)

Then add in the army books for ohhh another $33 per player to actually sort out an armylist (remember the H/WM starters come with rules and points costs) - only to find out the HE army isn't actually legal (by about 800pts - at least another $100), and clocks in at several hundred points above the skaven army anyway, so more troops needed there, then to bring the skaven upto level points, another $100+....
If no one is playing fantasy - or if no one has started yet, the likelyhood (in todays economic climate, and with GWs prices the way they are) is that they won't. If you want to play fantasy, direct them to Mantic - cheaper models, free rules and army lists. If that doesn't convince them, nothing will and you'll need to either pack your armies away, or sell up.