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zendral
22-09-2011, 19:04
I've read all I could read on how to wash your bits when they arrive. How the mold release is slick and shiny and won't let standard GW paint stick (looks like the paint is getting soaked up when you out it on). I let my bits soak in a tub of simple green for hours and sometimes a day or 2. I scrub with a brush and still it remains slick and shiny. I thought this stuff was suppose to come off? Or am I doing it wrong? If nothing else, is car paint the only option?

Scalebug
22-09-2011, 19:18
Hmm... the "slick and shiny" finish there is how the resin is supposed to be, it's no problem painting over that.

What you wash off is the release agent, the greasy stuff that stopped the pieces from getting stuck in the moulds.

Vaktathi
22-09-2011, 19:18
I wouldn't worry about it. A few minutes under warm water with soap and a couple minutes of scrubbing is all you need, anything left won't really affect anything I've found.

marv335
22-09-2011, 19:18
I use isopropyl alcohol.
Then, I use a spray varnish before priming.

zendral
22-09-2011, 20:04
So after washing it's supposed to be slick and shiny? And GW spraypaint won't stick. It just cracks and falls off. What Priming paint should I use to stick to the shiny?

Radium
22-09-2011, 20:10
Some water + soap should get all of the release fluid off. And like Marv: I varnish my FW pieces before priming them. Seems to help a bit.

zendral
22-09-2011, 20:17
So you just use the GW Matt varnish spray, then any color primer after that?

Lars Porsenna
22-09-2011, 20:24
Personally I have never used any GW spray products (except their dullcote, which was excellent IF you got a decent can). All of my Forgeworld stuff is primed with either Krylon Sandable white primer, Wal-mart valu-cheapo Flat White spraypaint, or Testors Model Master Flat Black rattle can. I have never had a problem with paint flaking off. I also never wash my parts before painting either (and I have been a model builder for 25 years).

Damon.

Deamon-forge
22-09-2011, 20:26
if you in UK go to halford and use their grey car primer (what FW use) works a treat.

luchog
23-09-2011, 02:49
The vast majority of garage kit builders use automotive primer for their resin models. Halford in the UK, or Rust-Oleum in the US.

However, I've seen a few who swear by gesso. Most just paint it on, but somewhere online is a tutorial for using gesso in an airbrush. I don't have the link available anymore, thanks to a drive crash, but it's pretty much just getting the right dilution (a bit heavier than normal airbrush paint), and using a good high-pressure airbrush like the Iwata HP-BCS (at around 50-60psi if memory serves). I've tried it, and it seems to work pretty well.

Lord Gabranth
23-09-2011, 08:28
Personally I swear by rustoleum car primer gray. I have never had such an even coat come from a can of spray paint before.

samiens
23-09-2011, 11:33
I just use gw spray paint after a wash with washing up liquid and a scrub with a very soft toothbrush and have never had a problem with the spray sticking- and I typically use very light dusting with spray.

Dreachon
23-09-2011, 12:00
I support all the guys suggesting car primer, I use the halfords plactic primer and it's a joy to work with.

Killgore
23-09-2011, 12:01
I put some hot water in a bowl, squirt in some fairy liquid or whatever cheap washing up stuff I have, let the bits soak for a few minutes, scrub with an old toothbrush, run under water to wash the bits off then dry.

GW Black spray goes on rather nicely after that :)

tuo
23-09-2011, 17:57
I used to wash the Forge World pieces in soapy water, but had problems with some models, especially with huge, flat surfaces. I think the first kit where I ran into really big problems was both the reaver and the chaos brass scorpion.

I had the problem that some areas remained which did not take color at all.

Since then, I am using those bath/kitchen cleaning sprays which remove fat. You know the ones which spray into some kind of foam? I lay all the parts in my sink, spray them with this foam, let them sit for an hour or two and then let water run over them and let them air dry.

Since then, I never had problems (two reavers, couple of tanks, warhound, greater daemons etc. pp.). The resing even feels a little bit "rough" after this, not slick at all. Just did it with the long, long legs and holo fins of a phantom titan, and it worked like a charm as always.

best regards

tuo

zendral
23-09-2011, 18:40
I honestly don't get all you folks that use soupy water for a minute, scrub with brush, and use primer :p. You must all be getting the cleanest batches then haha. I've ordered a ton of forgeworld over the years. Iv'e tried it all, soup, brushes, letting it sit, different cleaners. And no...GW flat black will not stick like a couple of you say it is. Its too sleek and shiny. But I think you must be getting decent batches, because for the first time ever, my land raider Achilles arrived NOT sleek and shiny and paint sticks. And when I say slick and shiny, I mean a hard surface that has to be scraped with a Knife before reaching a surface where paint will stick. All my models from FW have been like that. My reavers, warhounds, tanks, extra bits...... So I geuss my only solution is car primer.

sigur
23-09-2011, 19:59
I've read all I could read on how to wash your bits when they arrive. How the mold release is slick and shiny and won't let standard GW paint stick (looks like the paint is getting soaked up when you out it on). I let my bits soak in a tub of simple green for hours and sometimes a day or 2. I scrub with a brush and still it remains slick and shiny. I thought this stuff was suppose to come off? Or am I doing it wrong? If nothing else, is car paint the only option?

Just scrub it thoroughly with a toothbrush and soap and you'll be fine. You won't see the residue, you won't feel the residue. Some surfaces will feel rough but residue is on them, some will feel slick, even as if slimy when wet, and will be clean.

IcedAnimals
24-09-2011, 02:28
I haven't had to wash any of my DK or the crisis suit I bought. paint stuck perfectly and years later its all still there.

AlphariusOmegon20
24-09-2011, 06:26
I honestly don't get all you folks that use soupy water for a minute, scrub with brush, and use primer :p. You must all be getting the cleanest batches then haha. I've ordered a ton of forgeworld over the years. Iv'e tried it all, soup, brushes, letting it sit, different cleaners. And no...GW flat black will not stick like a couple of you say it is. Its too sleek and shiny. But I think you must be getting decent batches, because for the first time ever, my land raider Achilles arrived NOT sleek and shiny and paint sticks. And when I say slick and shiny, I mean a hard surface that has to be scraped with a Knife before reaching a surface where paint will stick. All my models from FW have been like that. My reavers, warhounds, tanks, extra bits...... So I geuss my only solution is car primer.

No, you do have another option.

Sometimes the release agent accidentally permeates the top layer of the resin, basically "soaking" into it. It's rare, but it does happen every once in a while. There's really nothing you can do at that point but take it back to the store and get them to get you another one.

I've had to do that for roughly one out of every one hundred pieces that I've ordered from FW.

Draconis
24-09-2011, 13:14
Bottom line mate, you dont need to soak in simple green. Here are the best ways to do it.

1. Fill your bathroom sink with warm water, drop in some dish soap and use an old toothbrush, carefully brush the model. you don't need to be rough, or even scrub that long.

2. Rubbing alchohol, same thing.

3. Acetone or nail polish remover. This is what plastic cement uses to melt models together, however it does absolutely nothing to resin so the models are safe. It does however remove the compound.


As for friedrich, you got lucky. A normal resin model, if not washed, can be glued and primered, but when you try to paint over the primer, the release compound comes up through the primer. What happens is, imagine taking wax paper and trying to paint some water over it. The water will bead up. Thats what happens when you paint an unwashed resin model.

By the by, acetone is an amazing way to strip paint off of a resin model. I know it does nothing to the resin if you use it on resin and then wash it off, however I'm not sure about leaving a model in acetone, plastic cement, nail polish remover. I'll test it out here sometime.

Lars Porsenna
24-09-2011, 15:44
3. Acetone or nail polish remover. This is what plastic cement uses to melt models together, however it does absolutely nothing to resin so the models are safe. It does however remove the compound.
[quote] I Don't think I've ever heard of acetone used in plastic cement.

Usually plastic cement is Methyl Ethyl Ketone, or Trichloromethane.

[quote]
As for friedrich, you got lucky. A normal resin model, if not washed, can be glued and primered, but when you try to paint over the primer, the release compound comes up through the primer. What happens is, imagine taking wax paper and trying to paint some water over it. The water will bead up. Thats what happens when you paint an unwashed resin model.


I have neaver heard of this either. I have been building models for 25 years, probably bought my first resin kit in the early '90s. I have never washed my parts (plastic OR resin) and never had this effect you are talking about. I suspect the problem is primer based rather than mold release base.

Damon.

AlphariusOmegon20
24-09-2011, 23:53
[QUOTE=Draconis;5800278]
3. Acetone or nail polish remover. This is what plastic cement uses to melt models together, however it does absolutely nothing to resin so the models are safe. It does however remove the compound.
[quote] I Don't think I've ever heard of acetone used in plastic cement.

Usually plastic cement is Methyl Ethyl Ketone, or Trichloromethane.



I have neaver heard of this either. I have been building models for 25 years, probably bought my first resin kit in the early '90s. I have never washed my parts (plastic OR resin) and never had this effect you are talking about. I suspect the problem is primer based rather than mold release base.

Damon.

I can only assume you might be referring to the old Armorcast resin models, when you say the '90's.

The old Biasi/Armorcast titans you didn't have to wash first because IIRC they were washed at the factory, prior to packaging.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Lars Porsenna
25-09-2011, 03:31
I can only assume you might be referring to the old Armorcast resin models, when you say the '90's.


No I'm talking about Verlinden. I have never bought an Armorcast titan (though I have 2 Armorcast mechs: a Vulture and an Atlas). Since then I've bought resin from Miniarm, Accurate Armour, Legends, AEF Designs, Hauler, Kirin, Jaguar, and probably a handful of other manufacturers I'm forgetting. I've also done my own homecasting. And of course Forgeworld. I have never washed the resin ever. Or plastic sprues for that matter. I have only had ONE occasion where I've had a painting mishap (fisheye on a generic Pacific Rim kit, imported before that became commonplace...it was a MiG-31 FYI)

Damon.

Rolsheen
25-09-2011, 07:20
Simply use washing powder in a bucket of warm water and an old toothbrush and that will remove the parting agent they use. The Forgeworld kits have got better over the years, no more lumps of silicon mould stuck in the recesses.

spurker
25-09-2011, 07:44
Hmm, after washing i've never had a problem with primer sticking. Are you sure you're washing the soap/ detergent off properly? That wouls stop the primer sticking.

Draconis
25-09-2011, 19:24
Either way, its still advisable to wash and rinse your models before putting them together. why take a chance? I soak mine in warm water, add some dish detergent, use an old toothbrush, then rinse and air dry.

Spiney Norman
18-04-2015, 22:03
WHO DISTURBS MY SLUMBER??? Threadomancy detected!


For all you UK dwellers out there, I have found a couple of other stores that stock decent primers and at 4 per 300ml tin you can't go wrong! The Range sell a good decent colour range of both primers and spray paints and the other is Wilkies. :)

It's usually best to start a new thread if you want to share something like that, I would hope that the OP has found a solution to his problem after almost four years of elapsed time.