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cpl_hicks
16-04-2006, 13:35
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e

Ach, nein! Ich habe meine hosen geschißen!

if translated word for word to english comes out with

Oh no! i have my trousers ****!

while it should actually say

Oh, no! I **** my trousers!

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

thanks in advance for the help.

Gaebriel
16-04-2006, 13:49
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt
BBC english, which would be Commonwealth?


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Same as 1.


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e


if translated word for word to english comes out with

Oh no! i have my trousers ****!

while it should actually say

Oh, no! I **** my trousers!
Not very often, but between back when I learned english and now, I find more and more people using sentences that seem to be constructed in a way I didn't learn, and in fact are constructed in a way that seems close to my own language.


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
I don't see that "experienced way" from 3. from people of my own country very often, in fact they seem to write like me.


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
Depends, as I find it increasingly difficult (relating to questions 3. and 4.) to discern between a native english speaker and a someone whose first language is not english.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Probably, but not by me (see answers 3. to 5.).

edit:
btw. Thuds sentence is not entirely correct
"Ach, nein! Ich habe in meine Hosen geschissen!"
but that doesn't do much to the example... ;)

Sylass
16-04-2006, 14:09
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
Looking at your examples, it seems I learned Commonwealth english

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth english

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
Yes, sometimes.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Yep, I think it's a common "problem" when speaking or writing a non native language.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
I guess it's possible, but it's a long way to get rid of all the small errors...especially when speaking!

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Difficult to answer. All in all, I guess it's possible. Especially if said person uses slang words/not so common phrases.
On the other hand, if you take a look at this forum you'll notice that there are native english speakers who write "worse" than some non-native ones. Depends on the person I guess (how much time you invest to write posts using correct grammar, spelling...).

Hideous Loon
16-04-2006, 14:47
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
Dunno really, I suppose that 'tis Commonwealth though, I always type "colour" and "grey" and all that.

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
It's a bit up to the teacher, but mainly Commonwealth.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
I do not, as far as I am aware of at least. The English syntax is reminiscent of my own anyway.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Indeed I would, although it's mostly the unskilled speakers of English who do this.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
Yes, this has in fact occurred to me several times, that a native English speaker (do Plymouth and Chicago qualify?) has "spoken" to me over the intraweb and thought of me to be a native speaker of English.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Hm. Toughie, must be a neutral "maybe" there. Since most people are really good at English, even non-natives (I take credit from my own statement here, I hope you do not mind), it has become harder over time. If one would be a Professor or Master of English, one would not have such a hard time as a layman, of course, but we cannot all be, can we?

Pleased to be of service,
Loon

Black DH templ.
16-04-2006, 14:53
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

I guess it started the last year of kinder garten and it went on from there

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

In school we learn Commonwealth English, but our accent here in Norway is in almost all cases American with a few English pronounciations mixed in (and of course loads of Norwegian). This is because of the media: Mos of the TV shows and movies we like as children are American, and we are not really exposed to the spoken UK English language, nearly as much (As I guess is the case for several other countries). Personally switched to an English accent about three years ago (when I became aware of and started contemplating it for the first time).
Now I'm having fun trying to emulate a few UK accents like Scouse, Scottish, Irish, and Northern English generally.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e

Of course. It does happen. As the Norwegian setup is not TOO defferent from English it's easy to mix up the two. And as your skills advance you find more and more similarities and options which make it even harder to draw the line between the real English and Norwegian-English.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Yeah. It's not uncommon.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Yeah, as I'm somewhat of a closet Englishman I try as often as I can. Though, some sentences are harder to construct than others. And with hindsight I see that I frequently fail.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

Yeah, some posters are easy to spot. Speed typers aren't as easy, but I usaually notice. The ones who keep their language prwtty standard are a tougher nut to crack, though. One thing I've noticed is that it's easier to spot a natural English speaker than pointing out one who isn't (bad sentence). I can take you as an example. You didn't strike me as an obvious Englishman when I read the first part of your post. But I couldn't discount it either.

WiCkEdRock
16-04-2006, 14:54
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
Both. I saw a lot of american TV shows as a kid (X-Files, Millenium) so I caught up on that, but was taught commonwealth in primary school mostly.

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth english from the age of 7 to 12, teachers got more liberal with blending the two from the age of 13.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
I get a bit frustrated at times because some sentences I use can't be translated in a good way, so yes, you could say I fall back sometimes.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Yes, sometimes.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
It's possible, but I don't put too much time into it. Noone cares on the internet.
Speaking english is something entirely different, however. I can often tell if someone's from Sweden in no time when they're speaking english.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
The best clue is to look at the slang, but it's hard to tell due to alot of people being careless with their english on the internet. Take MySpace for example, I would take most people there for some japanese that had a 1 year education in english.

Barbarossa
16-04-2006, 15:16
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

commonwealth english


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

commonwealth too

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?


Yeah it does happen, but not that often and only when I don't pay any attention at all.


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Quite often and it makes me cringe since some people are just blatantly bad.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Wouldn't know about that, since I can't correct the mistakes that I can't see.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

Difficult. While it is easy to spot a non-natural by his mistakes, you usually can't spot a natural by his absence of mistakes. 'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence' and all that.


And by the way, it's "Ich habe in meine Hosen geschissen."
Without the 'in' you'd tell someone that you've actually ***** trousers out of your **** instead of more erm...traditional excrement. :angel:

skavenguy13
19-05-2006, 16:28
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt


I'd say a bit more "non-US English though I personally don't see a big difference because it's not my first language. From those exemples, I learnt both.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

Since we're close to the US border (Québec, Canada) then they show US English as much as UK because they also want to promote "international-level" spoken languages. But it's like a mix, it mostly depends on what teacher you get.
(BTW, English is taught since 7 year old and is one of the 3 most important subjects, along maths and French, because we're surrounded by English people).



3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e

Well, it looks the same a lot, but sometimes, your example happens.



4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Depends: see #3 for French.
For English, I can't understand most people here because they really suck. English exams here are all about "how to do an exam", not how to speak English. The way the exams are made, we need the very basics of English to always succeed.



5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Looking at the forums, I don't see the difference between me and the rest... except those who suck at typing correctly. Though most people around me can't.



6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

See #5: I'd say no.

Thud
19-05-2006, 17:02
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

British English.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

Same as above.


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

Not usually. Though I sometimes forget what I should say and Norwegi-fy my English. And as for the example, so I forgot one word! One lousy word! And I blame Sylass, he's the one who's taught me all the German I know...



4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Yes.


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Yes.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

Ironically, on the internet, the native English speakers tend to hold lesser English skills than their non-English counterparts.


thanks in advance for the help.

You're very welcome.

asparagus
19-05-2006, 17:36
1. British English (UK)
2. British English (UK)
3. Yes
4. Yes
5. Yes, but it will depend on the length of the sentence (... the longer the sentence, the more difficult)
6. No

justFIGHT
20-05-2006, 22:11
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

Commonwealth English. so i write colour, centre etc...


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

Both. there are schools that teach both or either one.



3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e


no, Arabic is so different to English.


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

no i havnt.


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

i can construct English sentences.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

no, English doesnt have to be a first language for you to be able to type like a natural english speaker.


thanks in advance for the help.

you're welcome. :D

Kjell
20-05-2006, 22:49
1) Commonwealth.

2) I'm not entirely sure. There are probably courses available for both, though I think Commonwealth English is more common. But then, I don't know.

3) Generally, no. I might do it sometimes but then it's usually not a huge, glaring error.

4) Sometimes, yes. It's unavoidable, really.

5) Me in particular or people in general? Either way, certainly. Practice makes perfect.

6) Often, yes. Not all of the time but I'm sure that people who have English as their first language has a different flow than those who've picked it up second-hand, so to speak. :p There's a whole bunch of sayings that native speakers are more likely to understand and use, too. Same goes for synonyms. As I said only a paragraph ago, though, practice makes perfect. If you read a lot of advanced English and write or speak it every day, you do pick up a thing or two. You won't get worse, anyway. :p

Griefbringer
21-05-2006, 06:51
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?


1.) UK English of course (there is a reason why the language is called English). But there are some lessons about American English too, and how it differs from proper English (spelling, some vocabulary).

2.) Same as for previous.

3.) Rarely anymore, but I guess I sometimes do mistakes on this.

4.) Sometimes.

5.) -

6.) Sometimes it is possible to tell that from spelling. There are a number of spelling mistakes that are typical to native English speakers (such as writing "would of" instead of "would have"), usually caused by homophony (two or more words written differently, but pronounced similarly).

Finnblood
21-05-2006, 09:10
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt

Commonwealth English. I frown if someone spells armour armor.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
Not really, and it's not too different, so it's really not a problem.


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Scarcely, yes.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
Easily.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Sometimes. I can pick out Germans and Finns too. But in the Nordic countries, foreign languages are considered very important, so often it is impossible to tell. Sometimes I mistakenly presume native speakers as non-native speakers, cos of typos and awkward spelling.

yerpo
29-05-2006, 16:38
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
I prefer Commonwealth english, although my english is probably a mix.

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth english, that's how I picked it up.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
Nope.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
It happens, yes, especially with people with less experience in writing/speaking.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
n/a

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Not in all cases, as previous posters already mentioned.

ekxw
02-06-2006, 13:23
this is funny

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
at first British English but later by my own american, you know films videogames.

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Brit

British English (UK)

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
Yes, sometimes, lately i dont know how to write proper english you know i tink the word but dont rememeber how it was speelled.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
yeah you cant know if its preoperly writen thats why i didnt translate to english my painting guides

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
uhmm dont know its more like i dont know if i write properly cause no one tolds me what is well written or bad

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

uhmm not at all some people for example finland people knbows a lot of english you know if your tv is only in english you learn english for sure XD, so not only british and americans can write proper english, australian people are in other hand XD, at least speaking................

anarchistica
03-06-2006, 00:19
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

Neither. I write "colour", "donut", "civilised" and "yoghurt".

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

Probably CWE, though American teachers are stubborn "z" abusers

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

Sometimes (sometimes the other way around too). I try to avoid speaking crap English though. ;)

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

All the time, especially from people who oughta know better (politicians!).

5. If yes to question 3, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Sure.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

Usually, yeah. I've been mistaken for a native speaker a number of times though.

Hellfury
04-06-2006, 07:11
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt

I grew up in chicago, but oddly enough, I was taught what you refer to as commonwealth. i.e. colour etc.

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
same as 1 though in very large metro areas, I have found discrepancies as to what is the norm, becuase of such a large population of foreigners

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thud
Ach, nein! Ich habe meine hosen geschißen!

if translated word for word to english comes out with

Oh no! i have my trousers ****!

while it should actually say

Oh, no! I **** my trousers!

No. If I do, it is very deliberate.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

I am native to north america, but russian is my first language

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Not applicable

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

I believe it is quite possible, depending on the experience that person has with the english language. Sometimes it is even easy to tell country of origin when they type in english just by sentence structure alone.

der_lex
06-06-2006, 17:04
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt

Education-wise, I was taught the CE spelling. Practical experience, however, is another matter.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

I can speak for two countries here, since I went to high school in Holland and got a degree in translation and applied linguistics in Belgium after that. Both countries teach the CE spelling. In Belgian academic circles, American English pronunciation and spelling is generally pooh-poohed as being 'inferior' to CE, although the newer generations of professors are slowly changing that perspective.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

Not consciously, and very rarely subconsciously. I'd be a very crappy translator if I did that on a regular basis :)

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

I'm with Anarchistica on this one, Dutch politicians grossly overestimate their grasp of the English language and speak what we call 'stone coal English'.
When you hear the average Belgian person speak English, it's comparable to a French person speaking English. Oddly enough, this is still the case for Belgians who have Flemish as their mother tongue.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

That depends on the person. I have met people who, in the second year of university English classes, were still unable to form a correct sentence or pronounce the word 'crow'. (How did they get that far, one might wonder).
On the other hand, some people have enough of a connection to a certain language to be able to pick it up and more or less master it like a native.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

It used to be, and in most cases it still is. Unfortunately it has become more difficult, since most younger people on the net today don't even bother to use proper spelling, grammar, or punctuation anymore. Therefore both a lot of native speakers and a lot of non-native speakers can often be unified under the 'retarded monkey' school of language users nowadays.

Lafeel Abriel
06-06-2006, 23:54
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth ("Oxford English")

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Last I knew they still tought Commonwealth english here

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

Actually its more like the other way around.:wtf:

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Occasionally, but mostly from people that dont have that much practice of speaking it.

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
I have been mistaken for a natural english typer in the past. Says a lot, does it not, neh? Should be possible given enough practice.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Hardly. The more expirience people get in typing english, the better they get at it, so it does not always work.

thanks in advance for the help.
A pleasure. Hope I was helpfull.:)

Snoozer
19-06-2006, 15:42
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

Both, but maybe American English a little more than British English (I do love the TV)


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

That always depended on the teacher, mostly probably British, but if we hade to write something the teachers didn't care if we mixed them.


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

Not that I' am aware of, I actually don't even know how to construct sentences in any language (I haven't actually learned any of my 3 languages in school so grammar is not my strong suit), I let the subconscious do all the work.


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Oh yes, I was very surprised when I went into my English class in my new school, oh boy was I surprised and not in a good way.


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

I don't know, I always write the same way, it does not matter if I have 10 minutes or 10 hours to write it.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

NO

Because lets look at me as an example, on my free time I read/write on forums in English, I read books in English, I read the news in English, I write everything on my computer in English (even post it notes attached to my computer screen) most of my free time I even think in English, but not ever do I speak English, never.

So my point is even though I made only 2 spelling mistakes in this entire post (thank you MS Word), and like to think that its not a complete mess, I’m not that great when it comes to speaking English, as I never really have to use it for other than writing.


thanks in advance for the help.

You’re welcome, but may I ask what are these questions for, pure curiosity or is there something more sinister behind this all??

(Oh holy deity of your personal choice let it be the destruction of all non-English speaking people who don’t care enough to run their text through a spellchecker :p)

:D

BlazeXI
08-07-2006, 08:35
I'm a special case here. I was botn in Poland but my father had a contract in London so we moved for 5 years when I was 3 months old. So english was the first language I've learnt. I was here in Warsaw at Copernicus Grammar School (High School for US readers) which had highest level of english teaching in Warsaw and probably in Poland. And I have dislexia, so excuse my mistakes:evilgrin:.

Here are my answers:

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
British English. US and UK movies (Bonds! are helpful), Warhammer (yes, it enlarges vocabulary very efficiently and is in UK english), music (most of my favourite bands are from UK) and last but not least "Listen with Nico" from Iron Maidens "the first ten years" singles collection.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

Grammar is british. But we had american and canadian native speakers, no UK ones.


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

Rather not, I hope.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Yes.


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Yes, I would. I reckon.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

It really depends on how the person knows english, not if he isn't a native speaker. Lord_Blackfang (?) is a good example. i thought he's from UK but he is from Slovenia.



thanks in advance for the help.

Hope that has helped a bit.

Festus
13-07-2006, 20:29
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

I definitely learned Commonwealth English, ie. BE (British English), as do all Germans during their education in the public school system.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
If you are referring to university by saying *academically*, it is neither-nor: All varieties of English are accepted as standard. Or as my colleagues put it: Never correct a native speaker! :D


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
Yes, I do, unfortunately. But I hope I do it only rarely :)


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Yes, definitely... as an English teacher, I do it for a living, you know... ;)


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
I most certainly am. :evilgrin:

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
More often than not, actually. I can smell the *stink* of a native speaker of the German language anytime - even over the internet.


thanks in advance for the help.

You are very welcome ...

Greetings
Festus

sigur
13-07-2006, 22:03
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

British English with the option to use the US versions at tests, homework, etc. as long as we kept it to one version.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

British English mainly.


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
i.e

Seldomly, but it tends to happen here and there.



4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Quite often. Not on Warseer (there are not many Asutarians around anyway), but on other forums.


5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

On a good day, I might.;)


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?


It depends how long the text is, if you can read some kind of dialect out of it, and so on. But generally, I'd say that I couldn't tell if I'm talking to a guy from Varna or Liverpool after, let's say, 7 minutes of chatting, maybe I could after a bit longer time. If I read a text, I most definitly couldn't tell if the author is a native English speaker or not.

Drabant
13-07-2006, 22:32
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

Commonwealth mostly, but we call it british english.


2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

See 1. Most people will speak american english due to american TV. I try to keep my english british.


3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

No.


4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

Generally no.


6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

It is possible to tell that they are not. But I am surprised how many kids today (online), despite being american or even british, have very poor english grammar and spelling. I would say that, yes, you can deduct if they are native english speakers, but only those with exceptional skill at their own language, and you can never be completely sure.

Makaber
13-07-2006, 22:39
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth.

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Commonwealth, but US spelling is allowed in tests and such if it's consequent.

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
No.

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
No, but norweigan and english sentences are buildt very similary.

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
Depends on the kind of errors. Often, the worst english comes from people who speaks it as a first language.

T10
18-07-2006, 20:56
1. American Enlgish
2. British English
3. No.
4. No.
5. N/A.
6. No. The other way around would be more apparent.

T10
18-07-2006, 20:57
So, we've answered the questions. Why this interest in us furriners?

Festus
18-07-2006, 21:01
Don't be pushy! :D

I'm sure he will tell us soon enough... or will he??? ;)

Dr. Doom
18-07-2006, 21:13
Don't be pushy! :D

I'm sure he will tell us soon enough... or will he??? ;)

Yeah I bet he didn't expect some kind of Spanish Inquisition....*sits and waits*

Azrael Rose Sanglante
25-07-2006, 21:08
1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?
I think UK/Commonwealth english at the begining, but I have some US deformations...

2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?
Currently, it should be UK/Commonwealth one

3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?
It can occurs, unfortunately, I'm sorry

4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?
Unfortunately, yes, most of time

5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?
Sometime... it can be possible...

6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?
I'm not so accurate, but perhaps with some expressions...

I hope, I was so sufficient for your information... euh, I'm french...
Best regards.

CapitanGuinea
27-07-2006, 13:41
right ive just got a couple of questions for people who dont have english as their first language.

1.When you learnt english did you learn american english or Commonwealth english?

i.e color instead of colour
yogurt instead of yoghurt

British English. Not Commonwealth, Not American. british



2. If taught academically does your country teach american english or Commonwealth english?

British.



3. When speaking or typing in english, do you sometimes fall back into your own dialects way of construction sentences, creating sentences in english text but constructing them in your own dialects ways?

no



4. Do you see this kind of sentence construction in other people from your country?

sometimes.



5. If yes to question 4, if given enough time do you believe you would be able to construct a sentence, to appear to be written by a natural english speaker/typer?

Every Human Being is able to, man.



6. On the internet do you belive that it is possible to tell if a person is a natural english speaker, from text only?

just if he/she is a very high level scholar.

cpl_hicks
27-07-2006, 21:29
British English. Not Commonwealth, Not American. british

commonwealth english is British english

Arduhn
31-07-2006, 22:13
same thing really, most people who use british english speak with a british accent but not all. In Canada, for the most part, we use british english but we speak more like americans than british (depending on the region). We still use u's in spelling though and call it a zed and not a zee.

I find this topic interesting since I recently started learning German. I find that sometimes I want to do word for word translations but they don't always work. Sometimes it works better if you think of older, more arcane constructions from english.

ex: Where goest thou? = Wo gehst du?

I guess I am lucky I grew up going to church and reading the bible, shakespeare helps too :)