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Delicious Ron
15-04-2012, 03:51
How do you do it? Now of course narrative games maybe aren't for everyone but how do you win over those that simply doesn't know how to start? I had this trouble with my gaming group when I pitched a Blood in the Badlands campaign and I asked them to make up backstory for their characters, just a few sentences, and they went silent on me. I play roleplaying games alongside my tabletop games so this stuff has always been natural to me but I'm the only one in the group who has that background. I do believe they would enjoy it greatly if they just could get over their mental hurdles.

So how do you do it?

MyNameDidntFit
15-04-2012, 03:57
Perhaps try giving them a couple of 'generic' backgrounds to choose from for the first time? It might help them get into the mindset and see what they can do with it/how fun it is.

Or maybe have a brainstorming session?

DareX2
15-04-2012, 05:26
I think the best way to do it is to talk to your players. Start asking questions about what their army is trying to accomplish, or who the big players are. Simple questions, like, "Where'd they get that magic item from?" can get players thinking. It genuinely doesn't take much to get a creative seed implanted in somebody's mind. Some people are just too shy or literal minded to really come out and create something fun. Ask them a variety of basic journalistic questions (who/what/why/etc). Once the ball is rolling, they'll jump in. If they're really stuck, create some background for them to work with. Make an enemy for them, or give them an obvious objective or problem that needs over-coming for them to base a character around. Most importantly, get really into their ideas. Encouraging them to keep creating is very powerful.

Andy p
15-04-2012, 11:05
How do you do it? Now of course narrative games maybe aren't for everyone but how do you win over those that simply doesn't know how to start? I had this trouble with my gaming group when I pitched a Blood in the Badlands campaign and I asked them to make up backstory for their characters, just a few sentences, and they went silent on me. I play roleplaying games alongside my tabletop games so this stuff has always been natural to me but I'm the only one in the group who has that background. I do believe they would enjoy it greatly if they just could get over their mental hurdles.

So how do you do it?

This is quite an interesting question. It's certainly a challenge for some, usually those who are better at the stats and lists side of the game. Although im not trying to say that all people who are interested in stats and lists will not be interested in a good narrative campaign.

Personally id love to engage in a narrative campaign, I have all kinds of ideas, such as beating someone and taking his territory results in hatred from the one who lost towards that opponent's army...perhaps even a dice roll for it.

Also there are others but I dont want to distract too much from your original topic point. I suppose the only real advice is enthusiasm, try to get others to see how you see it.

You could also write up a campaign draft and let them take a look, they might just be drawn in by it.

-Totenkopf-
15-04-2012, 17:04
I have played WH for quite a long time and have had lots of friends pick up the hobby over the years. Whenever I have a friend or even a stranger talk to me about starting the hobby, I tell them to choose an army they like the look of and learn to play. That is the beginning of an emotional attachment to their army. From there, as the army grows, most players begin to learn the game and have an idea about what makes their race who they are and have also had a chance to read some fluff. The second thing I tell new players after they have chosen their army, is to find a theme for it. Whatever that may be, whether based on a character, an area of their kingdom, a great battle in their book etc.. Most players I know have started is way. Campaigns are a fantastic way to bring that part of the army to life. The who/what/why/where questions are a great way of helping players realize that they already have a great framework to build a story on even if they never sat down and came up with character names or anything like that. Most of us have a general theme that we have built our army's around and some may not even realize it..

A good buddy of mine recently started playing Daemons. He loves the khorne models and for the most part, a khorne army suits his personality.. ;) We began a narrative campaign and we really needed to help him with the personal side of things. He had a hard time naming his daemons... However, he had a clear vision of what his army was all about and had no problem brainstorming how to fit it in and create a purpose for them in the campaign.

TheLionReturns
15-04-2012, 20:40
How about writing up a battle report for one of your games in a narrative style rather than as a factual breakdown, and posting it on a forum or a blog, or even just showing them? I suspect that sometimes it is hard to know where to start and indeed what the value of an accompanying narrative is. If your fellow players can see how this write up brings the battle to life, so to speak, they may be won to the merit and indeed have a template to show them how the narrative can be created out of a game.

Kayosiv
16-04-2012, 03:36
Get em to read my battle report thread =)

Selfless plug aside, I enjoy writing up what the battles mean and the adventures during and in-between the games just as much as like playing.