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Glenn87
17-04-2012, 09:34
hey,
what is GorkaMorka about?
I play Orcs in fantasy, but don't want to start a WHOLE Ork army in 40K.
I've checked GorkaMorka awhile ago, but don't know what it is.

Could someone explain?

Thx

Poncho160
17-04-2012, 09:57
Hopes this helps.

The object of the game is to lead a group of warriors to fame and fortune within the setting. Players choose from a range of factions with varying motivations and abilities and fight battles against others. Most of these groups are between five and fifteen fighters with appropriate transport, known as a "mob". Battles take place in an assortment of locations and scenarios, including sieges, races, and rescue missions.

The gameplay is not dissimilar to Necromunda, which also revolves around small gangs. The primary difference is the inclusion of vehicles, although there are many significant differences that lead to Gorkamorka being a less "serious" game by comparison, characterised particularly by less lethal ranged combat and the bizarre nature of the Orks.

Games are designed to be played in a series and form a campaign, wherein fighters gain new abilities and suffer permanent battle injuries or death, and new warriors are purchased, or "retire" once they get to too high of a level. Players earn money ("Teef") based on how well they perform and the relative strength of their opponents. The campaigns are designed to be open-ended, allowing new players to join and leave at any time thanks to a mechanic which adjusts the rewards players receive evening out the power disparity. The closest thing to winning a campaign would be reaching the "retirement" level before other players.

On a personal note, the game features rebel grots as a playable faction. Rebel grots are easily one of the coolest factions in 40K!! lol

Glenn87
17-04-2012, 10:47
haha a friend of mine will like that. He loves Grots/Gretchin.

Would we be able to play the game withouth the campain? just random games? Or does it 'HAVE' to be a campain?

DarthSte
17-04-2012, 10:49
One off games are fine, games like GorkaMorka and Necromunda are much more fun as campaigns though.

If I remember correctly the basic story is based around an ork hulk crashing on a remote feral world and the different factions trying to build a rocket to get off and rejoin the Waagh. To build the rocket they need to fight over the scraps of resources strewn across the planet.

zoggin-eck
17-04-2012, 11:11
Sadly, if you want to play an Ork army in 40k, like you said in your post, then Gorkamorka (a skirmish game based on a previous edition of 40k) has absolutely nothing to do with what you want, fun game that it is.

As usual, boardgamegeek has some info on it:

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/5255/gorkamorka

Spider-pope
17-04-2012, 11:18
Sadly, if you want to play an Ork army in 40k, like you said in your post, then Gorkamorka (a skirmish game based on a previous edition of 40k) has absolutely nothing to do with what you want, fun game that it is.

As usual, boardgamegeek has some info on it:

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/5255/gorkamorka

I disagree. I found Gorkamorka a great use for my Ork army as i was building it. It's far more motivating getting squads painted if you know they have a history of duffing up other Orks before they ever grace the battlefields of 40k.

It's also a great excuse to work on some suitably orky vehicles and terrain that can then make the transition over to your 40k army and battlefields.

Given that the OP wants to enjoy some Orky goodness without making an entire Ork army for 40k, i say he should go for it. The rules are still available for free on the GW website, all he needs is a couple of Trukks, a box of boyz and someone to duff up.

zoggin-eck
17-04-2012, 12:14
Given that the OP wants to enjoy some Orky goodness without making an entire Ork army for 40k.....

Ack, seems I'm a fool (and happy to admit it) and didn't read the "don't" part of "don't want to start a WHOLE Ork army in 40K."

Oopie.

Anyway, it might be a bit of a challenge to find new players. If Glenn87 is lucky, and can find mates who also want to play Orks, and an old game, then go for it. An alternative might be to play some smaller skirmish games of 40k, like a zone mortalis game with self-made terrain. Either way will need some effort, but I'm sure would be worth it. Me, I'd probably have to settle with collecting whatever Ork models I like and just paint them up for fun. Anyway, Glenn87, try making a thread (or searching) in the specialist games section.

Are the rules actuallly still on the GW site? I know I downloaded them at the time, but I can't see them now. Not that it matters, it's easy enough to find them.

Paul 8v
17-04-2012, 13:21
Gorkamorka is easily one of the most enjoyabke and mad games I've ever played by GW, I'd strongly suggest trying it. Be wareythough, if you don't use a Gorkamorka base on the figures or make one to suit they won't all fit on the Trukks (Or however da Orks spell dat) and if they fall off I think they fall of in-game but don't quote me!
It's a great one to do on the cheap as you build the vehicles out of stuff in your bitz box or just old junk from round the house!

AlphariusOmegon20
17-04-2012, 15:54
hey,
what is GorkaMorka about?
I play Orcs in fantasy, but don't want to start a WHOLE Ork army in 40K.
I've checked GorkaMorka awhile ago, but don't know what it is.

Could someone explain?

Thx

Glenn, I'd have figured you'd had enough of painting green after doing the Salamanders. ;)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Chem-Dog
17-04-2012, 18:51
On a personal note, the game features rebel grots as a playable faction. Rebel grots are easily one of the coolest factions in 40K!! lol

Nah, Muties are way better. For Magod!!!


The biggest issue is getting enough mates interested in playing Gorkamorka in the first place, while nowhere near as expensive as building an army the Skirmish games do require a good number of models and an almost constant alteration of the ones you use. So unless you're blessed with an abundance of Ork players (who should all be thoroughly entertained by the idea) or you're willing to outlay enough on models to lend out, you might find getting a campaign (the best way to play the game) hard to get running.
I'm not saying this to put you off though, it's just a warning. You may be lucky with the guys you play regularly though.

The Ork range is fantastic with nigh-on endless interchangeability there's so much scope for tweaking everything in it that it's too good an opportunity to pass up if Greenskins appeal to you though, definitely look into doing it if you can.

Grimbad
17-04-2012, 19:12
Would we be able to play the game withouth the campain? just random games? Or does it 'HAVE' to be a campain?

To clarify, the campaign has no map or story other than the battles themselves and the aftermath. After a battle, you and your opponent count up experience points for your orks based on the scenario, with which you can buy skills. You also get teef from your orks, and you can spend those in Mektown on medical aid or new orks or vehicles. Some of your Orks will also get injured. And you do this after every battle, no matter how many battles you play and against which opponents. All that the campaign requires is a few players and the patience to do that little bit of post-battle paperwork, and it pays off by developing your mob into something unique and cool.
And also replacing your brain with a squig and stealing your teef.

wilsongrahams
17-04-2012, 19:40
I've been trying to get my friends into gorkamorka too. I used to love it and still have an ork army now, as does one other player, however most haven't even heard of it which is where the problem lies - plus most didn't get into 40k until after 2nd edition was history so the whole ruleset would be new to them, though being old fantasy gamers they should understand the weapon profiles with no trouble.

One thought I did have was to update gorkamorka to suit the current 40k. The loss of BS and extra CC attacks could be an issue, and a Nob being much harder could be a big change, but I don't think it would be that different - even if it just turns out to be very small themed games. Has anyone else thought of doing this? Would you adjust profiles or weapon strengths etc, or allow the lower bs to make up for the higher strength weapons?

This suggestion garnered more support from my friends and so I have been looking at skill tables etc with a view to this. Vehicles would likely remain gorkamorka not current 40k.

Chem-Dog
17-04-2012, 22:18
One thought I did have was to update gorkamorka to suit the current 40k. The loss of BS and extra CC attacks could be an issue, and a Nob being much harder could be a big change, but I don't think it would be that different - even if it just turns out to be very small themed games. Has anyone else thought of doing this? Would you adjust profiles or weapon strengths etc, or allow the lower bs to make up for the higher strength weapons?

This suggestion garnered more support from my friends and so I have been looking at skill tables etc with a view to this. Vehicles would likely remain gorkamorka not current 40k.

This would represent a pretty substantial re-write, enough to qualify it as a separate game. I tried it during the 4th Ed with Necromunda and there were seemingly no end of tweaks that needed to be made to get it running smoothly. How weapons work was by far and away the biggest hurdle. I would suggest giving it a go with the old rules as-is to start with, none of it is so alien from the current set to make it awkward to newer players, and see how you go from there.

carlisimo
18-04-2012, 03:33
Gorkamorka is how I got into 40k. Man, I loved it.

I once had a very promising young ork whose leadership was rising quickly. After one battle it reached the nob’s leadership value, which meant a pit fight for control of the gang. Well, the nob was having none of it and injured the young ork in the leg. I didn’t want that ork to have trouble getting into hand-to-hand combat, so I took him the doctor. The doctor screwed up (bad dice roll) and gave him a squig brain transplant, which mean each battle he’d either have rage or stupidity. First turn next battle he walks off the trukk while it’s at full speed, gets run over, and dies. Sigh.

You can start with one large vehicle and fewer than 10 orks. Eventually you could end up with 2-3 trukks/trakks/battlewagons, a few bikes, 10-20 orks, and a few gretchin. You sort of need a fort, too. (So yes, you’d have a small 40k ork army.) Unlike Necromunda, you don’t need much other terrain, though it doesn’t hurt. Though there are nobs, normal orks, young orks, mechanics, and slavers that you might want specific figures for, the original game encouraged you to use the included figures for all of them at first. (I don’t know the English terms for those guys… I played in Spanish.) Just paint the nobs darker green, the young orks lighter green, and make a slaver whip out of melted sprue or whatever. I had extra orks, so I wasn’t afraid to cut off a hand to replace it with a hook, or make a bionic eye out of putty. With orks, crazy conversions are fun!

There is one problem. Orks back then were very small, and Gorkamorka included tiny bases that even the small orks had trouble standing on. Why? Because vehicles could carry as many orks as you could physically balance on them. You might want to skip that rule or magnetize your bases for easy removal. It might be okay with the larger size of the modern trukk and battlewagon models.

(btw, Necromunda is the same game – same rules, same campaign rules, etc. – but with strong guns and weak humans, and no vehicles. You NEED terrain in that game or everyone ends up dead. In Gorkamorka the guns are pathetic, so you’ll end up wanting to run up to the other orks and punch them in face. Vehicles help make that happen.)

Wishing
18-04-2012, 08:18
(btw, Necromunda is the same game – same rules, same campaign rules, etc. – but with strong guns and weak humans, and no vehicles. You NEED terrain in that game or everyone ends up dead. In Gorkamorka the guns are pathetic, so you’ll end up wanting to run up to the other orks and punch them in face. Vehicles help make that happen.)

I guess that is my main concern with Gorkamorka, that the greatness of Necromunda came from the terrain and maneuvering around it to try and get the jump on your opponent. Gorkamorka being in a desert and focusing on HTH, isn't it just two trucks driving straight at each other and then a big fight? Not much variation in that, though I guess that's what scenarios are for. I did play it back when it came out, but only a couple of games so I don't remember much.

About the campaign rules, as others have said, they're not really campaign rules in the conventional sense. They are simply mob advancement rules, letting you do some bookkeeping after each game so that dead guys might stay dead, guys who did well gain new skills, and you get money to buy more guys and trucks. Entirely optional, but getting experience for your boyz is so much fun that there is hardly ever any reason not to use the advancement rules.

Yodhrin
18-04-2012, 08:26
For the basing/trukks issue, I'd suggest putting in a wee bit of extra effort with the basing process using magnets makes it easy to solve, perhaps even better than it used to be if, like me, you didn't have a clue about magnetisation back in the day.

Make small ovoid bases out of 1mm plasticard(just large enough to carefully balance the figure upright and no more), drill into it under the feet and superglue in some magnets. Then you can modify some normal 40K bases so that the minibase slots into them and rests on a thin bit of metal, and put the same metal on the bed of your gorkamorka trukks.

It is a great game though, I wish GW would give it a rerelease like Space Hulk.

EDIT: Wishing, you have to remember that the vehicle rules in GM are quite involved, just driving headlong at your enemy sounds like a great strategy until that enemy shoves a ten-foot spiked ram into your trukk and sends your boyz cartwheeling across the table to get mangled :p

carlisimo
18-04-2012, 19:08
It CAN be a matter of driving towards each other and then slugging it out, but it doesn’t have to be. The ramming rules can result in some great vehicle battles while passengers shoot at the other vehicles, turboboost attempts backfire, boarding planks and grappling hooks get used (with some orks trying to jump across and failing), etc. Besides, you’re free to use lots of terrain. It would definitely make the battles better, but a lack of it doesn’t screw you over like it does in Necromunda. If you go nuts on heavier weapons and make your fort complicated, you end up playing Necromunda anyway. It’s a flexible game.

I really liked the car chase scenario where everyone starts in vehicles, and every turn the board moves backwards like a conveyor belt (move all terrain and models 6” backwards or something like that – vehicles at normal speed stay still). Meanwhile there are scrap tokens on the board that you want to try to collect.

wilsongrahams
18-04-2012, 20:01
Regarding the transport capacity of the new trukk models - the actual space in the rear section is almost identical to the old trukk model included in gorkamorka so you can't just use the new model with 25mm bases - however I never really had trukks packed with models anyway and you can still easily fit eight orks in the back even on 25mm bases. The higher sides help :-)

I played Necromunda and Gorkamorka and found them both to be fully entertaining, but they are different, but neither for the worse. The terrain in necro is compensated for by the lack of decent shooting and the vehicles in gorkamorka.

Regarding my comments about using 5th ed 40k rules to start a small campain - I disagree that it would require too much of a rewrite - it's only the actual skills in the skill tables that would need looking at, and for a simpler version it wouldn't be too hard - however I would suggest the drop of the attack bonus for charging and leave out sweeping advances etc - just leave them engaged until one is down. Whilst it would not be as involved as the real gorkamorka it could inspire others to try it properly - getting the rest of your group to buy a box of orks and a trukk is the hard part afterall - getting them to learn rules and buy models could very well put them off.

Harry
18-04-2012, 20:44
Gorka has some of the the vehicle rules ever written and is great fun.

Great way of dipping your toe in the 40K universe for some Orky entertainment.

Flamekebab
18-04-2012, 22:14
Gorkamorka is easily one of my favourite games ever. I love Necromunda too though and the rule sets are nearly identical.

However there's a few factors that make the two games very, very different. In Necromunda shooting is really important, as is cover, and pinning enemies down to prevent them returning fire. Progress around the board is at walking pace and injuries can rarely be remedied. The resulting game is much more tactical than Gorkamorka, although still fun.

Gorkamorka on the other hand allows for much more movement due to vehicles and notably due to the thrusting mechanic. Vehicles don't move like in 40K, they get turbo boosters that can be used every turn repeatedly. This can be both howlingly frustrating and amazing at the same time. I've had a trukk come onto the board as reinforcements and move ~30" in a single turn!

Furthermore Orks and Muties are not subject to pinning. This means that shooting them does not disable them temporarily which really changes the motivation behind certain key aspects. The Orks' default Toughness is very high too so they prove surprisingly difficult to harm. The game ends up much more spontaneous and crazy, giving it a unique style.

These kinds of subtle differences only become obvious when you play the game. I would suggest that attempting to rewrite the rules would be needless effort. They're not that complicated, at least not complicated enough to justify the massive amount of time and playtesting a rewrite would require. Instead I would suggest running a few small scale 40K games with them and seeing whether they like the smaller scale or not. It might be worth seeing whether other factions are of interest to them too. It's not just Orks on Angelis.

carlisimo
18-04-2012, 23:20
Yeah, keep the rules. They’re easy to learn, more appropriate for individual models rather than squads, and the OP isn’t an expert in 5th edition 40k anyway.

As for getting people to start playing, it’s no harder or easier than any skirmish game. Orks from the Assault on Black Reach box are cheaper (whether on eBay or from GW – they sell single-pose, no-option orks for 71% as much as the regular ones). Each player needs 6-8 to start. I’ve seen people make trucks out of the most random things, like a buggy made from a toilet paper roll plus wheels (it looked like a race car from the ‘30s). Rebel Grots can use Fantasy Snotling Pump Wagons or the smaller Skaven war machines, maybe even chariots (stick a sail on them, have them pulled by grots or squigs, whatever). Mutants would be more difficult to create, but Slaanesh Seekers with Kroot parts would fit the bill. The fort will take a bit of work using popsicle sticks, cardboard, Lincoln Logs, and aluminum foil. Or Stompa parts if you’re rich.