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View Full Version : Pursuing-Catching ... can you reform?



shaywarren18
15-01-2013, 22:06
I'm still trying to learn the game and am having a hardtime navigating the rulebook ( I have the IoB minirulebook currently). If you cause someone to flee, you run them down on the spot, than move your 2d6. Are you able to reform after? Is it a free reform or do you have to pass a leadership test, or can you not reform at all after running someone down? Same goes for if you arnt in close combat. You charge a fleeing unit, if you catch them you continue your 2d6+move or do you stop where you killed them? And do you get to free reform, or do you have to pass a leadership test or no reform at all?

Also do you get to re-roll all leadership tests with a musician or just when your doing your break test?

Pages would be handy if you have the mini rulebook.

Thanks in advance, Shay.

thesoundofmusica
15-01-2013, 22:21
If your enemy breaks from combat and your pursuit roll is high enough (equal what he rolled or higher) the enemy is destroyed and you move the full distance rolled. You get no reform.

If you charge a fleeing foe (either fleeing as a charge reaction or from earlier rounds) and catch them they are destroyed and you stop your movement where contact was made. You get a reform if a leadership test is passed.

Also musicians dont give leadership rerolls, the BSB (battle standard bearer) does that. I believe musicians grant +1 to attempts to rally, gives a win in drawn combats where one side has a musician and gives you access to swift reform.

Edit: I dont have rulebook access at the moment Im sure someone will kindly provide pages for reference.

shaywarren18
16-01-2013, 01:32
If you do a swift reform(by passing your leadership) at the beginning of your move phase, can you still declare a charge?

Lord Inquisitor
16-01-2013, 01:49
If you do a swift reform(by passing your leadership) at the beginning of your move phase, can you still declare a charge?

No. You only do a swift reform in the Remaining Moves phase, and you only get a (single) move afterwards - not a march either.

shaywarren18
16-01-2013, 02:13
But your normal move can take you into combat, correct?

JDV311
16-01-2013, 02:19
No, you must have the enemy in your line of sight to charge it.

Lord Inquisitor
16-01-2013, 02:21
But your normal move can take you into combat, correct?

As a rule, you may ONLY get into combat by declaring, and resolving, a charge. You may never "move" into combat. There are a few units (particularly Random Movement units) that break this rule but for the vast majority of units, you must declare a charge.

dementian
16-01-2013, 17:31
As a rule, you may ONLY get into combat by declaring, and resolving, a charge. You may never "move" into combat. There are a few units (particularly Random Movement units) that break this rule but for the vast majority of units, you must declare a charge.

And even the random movement units still treat their movements as charges once it is determined that the distance they move would bring them into contact with an enemy unit.

belgarath97
18-01-2013, 01:10
But your normal move can take you into combat, correct?

No. The only way to enter combat is with a charge.


And even the random movement units still treat their movements as charges once it is determined that the distance they move would bring them into contact with an enemy unit.

Yes and no, Random Movment units do not allow a charge reaction for example.

dementian
18-01-2013, 01:43
Yes and no, Random Movment units do not allow a charge reaction for example.

I was referring to how the Random Movement model moves with the wheel to maximize.

belgarath97
18-01-2013, 03:19
I was referring to how the Random Movement model moves with the wheel to maximize.

Fair enough, I just wanted to point out that there are differences. I'd hate for someone to read that random movement into a unit was like a charge and not realize it's not exactly the same.