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View Full Version : the wifes army list, food for thought



torn
20-01-2013, 10:37
the title is a bit misleading here

basically the wife was working out a diet thing on an online calculator, where she selected foods and they all had different calorie values. It was divided into segments, much like a warhammer or 40k army list. She was having trouble fitting all her food into her daily intake, apparently quorn isnt as healthy as it sounds.

anyway, i was wondering if any other gamer have had any experience with this, and if they have thought of 'powergaming' their diets. By going through her list and changing a few things I could get much more effective food for less points. Of course like powergaming you arent playing what you like, you are playing pureply to win. Could you do a horde list and take 200 tomatoes? The equivalent of a night goblin list I know, but its better than a burger and chips that is your whole army.

Promethius
20-01-2013, 11:59
the title is a bit misleading here

basically the wife was working out a diet thing on an online calculator, where she selected foods and they all had different calorie values. It was divided into segments, much like a warhammer or 40k army list. She was having trouble fitting all her food into her daily intake, apparently quorn isnt as healthy as it sounds.

anyway, i was wondering if any other gamer have had any experience with this, and if they have thought of 'powergaming' their diets. By going through her list and changing a few things I could get much more effective food for less points. Of course like powergaming you arent playing what you like, you are playing pureply to win. Could you do a horde list and take 200 tomatoes? The equivalent of a night goblin list I know, but its better than a burger and chips that is your whole army.

Really interesting idea. Unfortunately for me my current horde list features multiple beers and I am trying to be more of a salad and water (wood elf) player!

canberraguy
20-01-2013, 18:40
Veges, fruit and some meat as well. It is scary when you realise how much food we actually need to sustain ourselves compared to what people actually eat. We don't actually need much food compared to what your average person (in a developed nation) eats..

Hellebore
21-01-2013, 23:00
Because humans, like all organisms on this planet, have evolved in starvation prone environments. As such we've had to become extremely efficient at extracting what nutrients we can where we can and to develop many ways to protect ourselves from protracted periods of foodlessness. This is why we inately love the taste of sugar and fat, high energy foods that we've evolved to love to eat because we don't know when our next meal will be. If I eat a sugar cane it will see me through the next few days better than that bit of grass over there.

Unfortunately now we've changed our environment and extracted all the high energy nutrients that we love from everything. So now we have highly concentrated energy and an excess food, but our brains still think we're in Africa worried we won't find a grub to tide us over for the next four days.



As for powergaming my diet, well I handicap myself to make it more challenging. I've halved my food cost and had to come up with interesting mental strategies to distract my stupid neolithic brain from wanting tasty food it doesn't need.

Hellebore

Scaryscarymushroom
22-01-2013, 04:49
How to powergame a diet?

I can think of two ways to do it.

1: High-protein, low-fat foods, complemented by complex carbohydrates. A common example would be seafood with vegetables. Lacking seafood, chicken is a decent substitute. Not quite as good as seafood though. NO SUGAR (simple carb). Sugar destroys your body. Your liver metabolizes it the same way it metabolizes alcohol. Sugar is a poison.

2: With some research, you could spam protein bars, fiber supplements for digestive health, and multivitamins. Find a brand that you can trust, and always read the label. This list is pretty solid in most cases, but the spartan nature gives it a distinct disadvantage if your opponent brings any cravings.

The strength from the first solution is that it opens you up to enjoying a variety of different meals, which you can enjoy for their own sake. The strength from the second solution is that it allows you a little bit of freedom to enjoy a taste (just a taste) of blatantly unhealthy foods such as cheese or cake.

The weakness in the first solution is that you really need to be careful of portion sizes. A weakness of the second solution is that (unless you're a food scientist) it's insanely difficult to find good, healthy products to eat, and it's not very fun.

Personally, my favorite is #1, but it's much easier to walk around with a pillbox and protein bars in my book bag; so in practice, I use #2. Either way, getting healthy usually requires a big lifestyle change. Most people find it difficult, and it won't happen overnight. Don't believe the fad-diet hype. 99% of the time it doesn't happen overnight.

de Selby
22-01-2013, 17:16
Entrees in fast attack, mashed potato in heavy support, that sort of thing?

Wikipedia informs us:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_energy

"Recommendations in the United States are 2,700 and 2,100 kcal (11,000 and 8,800 kJ) for men and women (respectively) between 31 and 50, at a physical activity level equivalent to walking about 1.5 to 3 miles per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour on top of the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life,[10] with French guidance suggesting roughly the same levels.[11]

Children, those with sedentary lifestyles, and older people require less energy; physically active people more. In Australia, because different people require different daily energy intakes there is no single recommended intake instead there being a series of recommendations for each age and gender group[12] although packaged food and fast food outlet menu labels refer to the average Australian daily energy intake of 8700 kJ (2079 kcal).

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the average minimum energy requirement per person per day is about 1,800 kcal (7,500 kJ).[13]"




Post your 2100kcal list!




"Increased mental activity has been linked with moderately increased brain energy consumption.[14]"

Think fast!

Gimp
23-01-2013, 12:58
I live in South Korea so I just spam kimchi.

budman
24-01-2013, 10:17
the normal weekday Battle list

480 K Breakfast - HQ you gotta base it of a good hq
1200 K Lunch and office snacks - the core of forces
297 K Proten drink post work out - the ellet slot post work out that burns 200+ K
210 K Lite tea - fast attack when Get back home

Scaryscarymushroom
24-01-2013, 14:50
I built a list last week that included a 990 K burrito in the heavy support slot. :) Believe it or not, The whole list was only 2200 k.