PDA

View Full Version : Getting into LOTR



Andy-001
14-02-2013, 12:05
Hi all,

I've been contemplating gettuing into WH40K mainly to play with my 4 year old, reading some advice on this on another forum seggested, unless you're willing to spend a lot in terms of both time and money it maynot be the game for you. The monet side put me off, I found this site by searching warhammer v LOTR and read an interesting (although old) thread on these boards, having not played either, I kind of get the differences and similarities between the two and whilst I haven't read all the Tolkin Books I do have the DVD extended version boxset, so I know more of the back story/fluff then compared to wh40k. However I still have the following questions;

1) Is LOTR as expensive as WH40K? Am I right in thinking its not as expensive as you don't need as big of an assembled army, in order to start to play.

2) Without starting a huge debate, is it a strategic and tactical game or more dice rolling? The only other boardgames I've really palyed and throughly enjoy is Chess.

3) what's the best way to get into starting playing LOTR, I've seen the strategic game that WS sell for 50 on ebay for about 20 or I've also seen the Mines of Moria for about 40 and a few other items like rule books but not sure exactly what they contain or what I need to start playing?


4) is it a good game to play or is a work of art ie collection of models with a game to use the models in? I appreciate there is various aspects to the hobby same with wh40k and different people will be involved for different reasons, ie game play, modelling scenery, painting or collecting. My main reasons to get into LOTR is for the fun game playing side and get more of sn understanding of Middle Earth, the Shires and LOTR in general, hopefully with my 4 year old who will grow into it more with me and spend time together. Although again I do like modelling which is why I could also get involved in model railway building as long as not too expensive.

Thanks and sorry for the long post any help most welcome.

Thanks again
Andy

Getifa Ubazza
14-02-2013, 14:49
1) Your correct. You need far fewer models than you do for 40k, so the start up cost is far less. 2 Captains and a boxed set of 12 plastic models for each and your good to go. Or you could just buy the new Hobbit boxed set, But that's 75. Using ebay will get you the LotR mini rulebook and some models for much less, if all you want is a game for you and your son to play.

2) I've had games which were very stategic and games that have ended up as a big pile up in the middle of the table. Both were fun. In the pile up game, the dice rolling did get a bit boring after a while.

3) If I were just starting out, I would get The Hobbit SBG and go watch The Hobbit movie before playing. It's awesome. I'm getting the big rule book, simply because I already have Mines of Moria. The Hobbit is the new version of Mines of Moria.

4) I would say it's GW's best game by far, But that is personal opinion only. It's often said that it's easy to learn, But hard to master. Oh and the painting and modelling are what you make them. I'm a lazy painter, so usually stick to 3 or 4 colours and thats it.

Whitwort Stormbringer
14-02-2013, 15:38
Getifa summed it up pretty well, I'll add a few points.

1) I'd say the entry point for LotR SBG is lower cost than 40K, but it can grow to be about as big if you decide you want to. The current Lord of the Rings rules (usually referred to as SBG standing for Strategy Battle Game) are best suited to skirmish-level engagements, anywhere from about a dozen models per side on up to 60 or so, depending on your army.

2) The dice-rolling should not be understated, because that is the basic mechanic for combat resolution. That said, positioning is still important, and knowing when to use your heroes special abilities is also important, so there is certainly a tactical element to the game. Like Getifa, I've had some games that were much more a game of cat-and-mouse and required more tactical thought than others. This can depend a lot on the armies involved, too.

3) Sorry, this one's going to be long. Normally, I would say getting the new hardback Hobbit rulebook and then the faction book(s) for whatever army(ies) you're interested in. However, if you're primary interest is playing with your 4-yo son at home, you really don't need to invest a lot of money into the new book. In which case, what to get to start out really depends on what factions you're interested in.

For Miniatures:

If you like goblins, then either the Mines of Moria or Goblin Town box is not a bad way to go since you get a good-sized goblin army out of either, but the good force is only a handful of heroes so you'd probably want to pick up a different good army just to keep things balanced when not playing the scenarios from the starter set. To stand against the goblins, you would probably want 2-3 boxes of plastic infantry and a couple of heroes for the chosen good force, although the exact numbers will depend on the force in question.

For Rules:

The upside to the Mines of Moria box is that it includes a rule manual that has several profiles and point values, including figures that aren't included in that box, so at least for a while it can serve as your only rule book. it is by no means comprehensive, though, so I might consider taking a look through it before buying a force to go against the goblins, just to make sure you know which models you'll have rules for. If you're not getting the whole box, you can still often find the rule manual sold separately on eBay, so that's one pretty cheap option for rules.

Another cheap alternative is the Return of the King rulebook, which also has a lot of profiles, and can be picked up on eBay. Like Mines of Moria, though, it is by no means comprehensive, so you'll want to know what's in it before planning your armies out based on that rulebook.*

The One Rule Book ("ORB") was the primary set of rules before the hard cover Hobbit rule book, and has a lot of profiles and detailed rules. I would recommend this one as the best option if you can find it affordably.*

For models that aren't covered in any of those three, unfortunately your only real option right now is either the Hobbit hardback (for any characters from The Hobbit) or the faction books that were released earlier. While not the cheapest options for rule books out there, you do know that with them you'll have all of the profiles for the faction in question so you don't need to worry about where to find the rules for a particular model, which were in some cases scattered all over various supplement books, old rule books, and white dwarf.

That's all kind of long-winded, but if you know what armies you're interested in you could tell us and I'm sure we could give you recommendations on which rules to get, the limitations of different books with regards to those factions, etc.

It should be noted that there are actually two different sets of rules that GW sells for The Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit. The first was the SBG, the second is War of the Ring (usually abbreviated on forums to WotR). The latter is a set of rules for much larger battles and requires a large number of figures, making it quite expensive to get into.

4) Well, while I do love the models, I agree with Getifa that it's the best set of GW rules I've played (although I also hear great things about the Warmaster rules, so who knows). That's not to say that the game is absolutely without any balance issues whatsoever, but then what game is? All told, I find it to be a fun game that plays well, and probably the best rules for melee-based skirmishes that I've tried. The fact that the same mechanics were carried over to some of the more popular Warhammer Historical games, and that the rules are frequently adapted to other settings by fans, is a testament to their playability.

*I have to apologize, I don't have the Mines of Moria book and my Return of the King book is buried in storage somewhere, so I can't answer as to exactly which profiles are or aren't in them. However, both should have enough profiles for you to build a basic force of just about any faction, it's some of the special troops and named heroes that you'll be missing out on. I'm sure some other forum-goer can give you better info on just what is or isn't covered by those books, though.

Andy-001
14-02-2013, 19:08
Not sure if this is going to post twice as one may be awaiting moderation but not come up as yet so I thought best to reply just incase it's gone missing.

Thanks for the replies.

I'm an absolute noobie in that I don't even know the basics as yet, such as how many dice involved or object of the game/scenarios, how the charactors interact with each other and do battle. I'ved looked at the FAQs and stickies about getting into both WH40K & LOTR but they don't seem to cover the absolute beginners, I think I need to pop into my local GW store and speak to them unless you guys can point me in the right direction.


Am I also right in thinking regardles of which route I take, either boxset from gw or buy rule book and some collection off ebay that we'd still need a game board and scenery to play as well? What sort of size game board 8x4 and then just model this into what ever scenery we choose? J

ust realised that The Hobbit: Escape from Goblin Town (75) limited edition has 56 miniture charactors, 1 play sheet (do you need one play sheet for each game palyed? Can you photocopy these??) a 112 page rule book (would I still need other rule books?) a 48 Page full colour 'Your Journey Begins Here' booklet (which contains profiles for all the miniatures within this box), Goblin Town platform 8 Dice, and 1 Ruler.

The The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey just contains the big rule book and seven exciting scenarios recreating the events of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey as well as more taken from the history of Middle-earth, such as the attack at Weathertop; details on fighting Points Match games; and a gallery of Middle-earth, showcasing gloriously painted Citadel Miniatures.

Would you need both to play for the first time?

Can you also get expansions pack for the Hobbit as again am I right in thinking theres 7 scenarios contained in the big rule book (at 50) do you need these to play or can you get the scenarios else where or can you make your up?

Sorry for all the questions, I need to pop to my local store don't I ~?

Thanks again
Andy

Andy-001
14-02-2013, 19:36
Sorry, just one other thing, looking on ebay theres so many different versions like lotr SBG for 25 brand new unopen, lotr core rule book for 10 inc del some at 0.99p just for the rule book and various other parts to the SBG is there any difference in playing style or are they just different and which is a good one to start with? For instance, is battle of gondor or ttt any good, where do you start if you were just to buy something off ebay? Rather than the newer Hobbit game, as obviously prices still high and no real 2nd hand ones although I think a guy is selling one on ebay for 21 but I think they're selling it in parts. The box set from GW does look good but not sure if 75 for me is a wise stareting point, especially when just starting out and may not be used. I also read about not to get too many figures to start with as otherwise an uphill task of painting them all becomes a mammoth task which I can understand (although applied more to wh)

Just starting to get my head around the listings on ebay now, is 40 (inc delivery) a good price for the orginal LOTR it says it contains the following;
Contains: 128 page full colour rulebook, 3 ruined buildings, 4 dice, 8 Men of Gondor (all neatly painted), 16 Elves (8 neatly painted) and 24 Moria Goblins (8 neatly painted). Boxed; some shelf wear.
Obviously depends how neatly painted it is (can you strip them down if wanted?) and obvioulsy its the older version but for 40 it's a good starting point isn't it? Also if we got thenewer version could you still use parts of this set in the new one?
Here's the link
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Original-Lord-Rings-Strategy-Battle-Game-/271154042491?_trksid=p5197.m1992&_trkparms=aid%3D111000%26algo%3DREC.CURRENT%26ao%3 D1%26asc%3D14%26meid%3D5596900820855669344%26pid%3 D100015%26prg%3D1006%26rk%3D1%26sd%3D271154042491% 26

fracas
15-02-2013, 04:08
Buy hobbit:sbg rules
Select two factions (one evil, one good) and buy a box set of plastic infantry each. Get a generic hero for each as well.
Then play a few games

Whitwort Stormbringer
15-02-2013, 11:07
I'm going to try to hit everything one-by-one, but before I do - going into your local GW store is definitely a sure-fire way to get a feel for the game, and someone there should be able to run through a couple of demos so you know what you're getting into. Like a lot of retail stores, though, especially when something is being demoed, GW staff can be notoriously pushy on sales and they'll probably try to get you to buy something, depending on your interests. Nothing wrong with that, just know it going in and don't be pressured into buying something that you don't need or won't use. That said, I've also been into plenty of GW stores where the staff were perfectly friendly and not at all pushy, so it's a bit of a stereotype and certainly not always true.


I'm an absolute noobie in that I don't even know the basics as yet, such as how many dice involved or object of the game/scenarios, how the charactors interact with each other and do battle.
Well, the very basic gist of the game is maneuvering your figures around the battlefield and fighting your opponent, but the objective or goal of a game will depend on what scenario you're playing. Some are a simple "fight to the death" setting where you just battle to see who wins, other times one army might be trying to escape from a certain board edge or acquire/take control of an objective while the other army tries to stop them, and still others are re-enactments of episodes in the books/movies.

A turn in the game breaks down as follows - players each roll a die, and the high-roller has priority for that turn. The player with priority moves his models, then the other player moves his models. Next the player with priority makes his ranged attacks, followed by his opponent. Then there is a shared melee phase where models in close contact fight hand-to-hand combat. Dice are used to determine whether a shot hits, whether a spell is successfully cast, who wins a hand-to-hand fight, and if the winner is able to injure his opponent.

Each character has a number of stats and abilities that represent what he is capable of:
Movement (M) - how far the character can move in inches
Fight value (F) - skill in combat, the first number is hand-to-hand and the second is shooting (lower is better for shooting)
Strength (S) - the character's physical strength, how hard he hits in hand-to-hand
Defense (D) - a combination of how tough the character is and how much armor he's wearing, essentially how difficult he is to injure
Attacks (A) - the number of dice a character rolls when fighting hand-to-hand combat
Wounds (W) - how many times a character can be injured before he is removed from play
*Might (M) - allows characters to inspire their men, acting out of turn if they don't have priority, or influence dice rolls to the character's benefit
*Will(W) - used in casting and resisting magic
*Fate (F) - essentially "luck", a way for characters to try and avoid being injured

The last three are only available to leaders and heroes, not everyday soldiers, and a hero only has a limited number of uses of each per battle.


Am I also right in thinking regardles of which route I take ... that we'd still need a game board and scenery to play as well? What sort of size game board 8x4 and then just model this into what ever scenery we choose? J
Yup, I think the standard battlefield size is 4'x4', although this may vary from scenario to scenario. An easy route is to simply get a large sheet of green felt that you can drape over the dining room table or a card table. Homemade scenery is usually the cheapest, but may be a bit daunting at first. Simple items like trees, hills, rocks, etc. can usually be bought at a local gaming or hobby store pretty cheaply, whereas stuff like buildings will start to cost a bit more.


ust realised that The Hobbit: Escape from Goblin Town (75) limited edition has 56 miniture charactors, 1 play sheet (do you need one play sheet for each game palyed? Can you photocopy these??) a 112 page rule book (would I still need other rule books?) a 48 Page full colour 'Your Journey Begins Here' booklet (which contains profiles for all the miniatures within this box), Goblin Town platform 8 Dice, and 1 Ruler.

The The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey just contains the big rule book and seven exciting scenarios recreating the events of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey as well as more taken from the history of Middle-earth, such as the attack at Weathertop; details on fighting Points Match games; and a gallery of Middle-earth, showcasing gloriously painted Citadel Miniatures.

Would you need both to play for the first time?
This all gets a bit tricky, so bear with me and I'll explain as best I can.

The Goblin Town box has a manual with the rules for how to play the game, but this manual does not include any character profiles. The "Your Journey Begins Here" book has the profiles for the characters from the Goblin Town box, but no point values, and no profiles for any other characters outside that box. The significance of point values is that they represent how good a character is, and are the basis for army building. For example, I might say "let's play a 500 point game", and you would be able to take characters whose combined point values added up to 500. Without the point values for the characters in the Goblin Town boxed set, you can't really use them in any game other than the scenarios provided in that box. In other words the Goblin Town box is essentially a self-contained game that allows you to play full games with the contents of the box, but that can't be used with other stuff unless you get the book that has the point values for those characters.

That leads us to the hardcover rule book. That is currently the most up-to-date rule book, and it is also where you'll find character profiles and point values for all of the characters from The Hobbit (not just the guys in the Goblin Town box). If you plan on playing with characters from The Hobbit you'll probably want this book. If not, then in my opinion you're better off looking for a cheaper, earlier edition of the rules since the rules haven't undergone drastic changes. I'll get into your options for rule book alternatives further down.


Can you also get expansions pack for the Hobbit as again am I right in thinking theres 7 scenarios contained in the big rule book (at 50) do you need these to play or can you get the scenarios else where or can you make your up?
You don't need the scenarios in the books to play, they just provide you with some variation in your games and are there to use if you want to. You can also always invent your own scenarios if you have a fun idea for a game.


Sorry, just one other thing, looking on ebay theres so many different versions like lotr SBG for 25 brand new unopen, lotr core rule book for 10 inc del some at 0.99p just for the rule book and various other parts to the SBG is there any difference in playing style or are they just different and which is a good one to start with?
For a rule book, I think your options are pretty much as follows:

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey - this is the most expensive option, but also the only option that includes profiles for models from The Hobbit. It also contains the most up-to-date rules*.
Mines of Moria Rule Manual - this is a small rule manual that was included in the Mines of Moria starter set, but unlike the Goblin Town rule manual this one does include character profiles for models that aren't in that starter set, and includes point values, so it has everything you need to play.
The One Rule Book - this was the hardcover rule book before the Hobbit rule book came out. It was only recently put out of print, so I don't know how easy/cheap it is to find second-hand just yet.

*while there have been 7 books containing the core rules for Lord of the Rings SBG so far, if you count the manuals that come in the Goblin Town and Mines of Moria sets, the rules have not undergone really major changes since the One Rule Book. First was the Fellowship which was very basic rules and a few profiles, TTT added cavalry and siege rules, and the One Rule Book pretty much collected and cleaned everything up that had been printed to date. The biggest difference between the Hobbit rule book and the One Rule Book, other than the profiles found in each, is that the Hobbit book has the more current "warband" rules, in which your army or organized into groups of 1-12 warriors led by a hero. In the older rules, there were basically no restrictions on army building or organization other than "good" and "evil."


For instance, is battle of gondor or ttt any good, where do you start if you were just to buy something off ebay?
Those books are supplements, so when they were printed they added new characters and troop types and new scenarios. They do not contain the main game rules, though, so you would still need a rule book to play. GW have released many supplement books for Lord of the Rings over the years, but they've pretty much all been put out of print. All of the profiles that were previously printed in these books, in White Dwarf, and online have since been collected into the force books that are now available from GW. These books also contain the warband rules, so you don't necessarily need the Hobbit hardcover book for those rules. In my opinion the various supplements are still worth getting for the background info, scenarios, and hobby content, but they're probably not a high priority for just getting started.


Rather than the newer Hobbit game, as obviously prices still high and no real 2nd hand ones although I think a guy is selling one on ebay for 21 but I think they're selling it in parts. The box set from GW does look good but not sure if 75 for me is a wise stareting point, especially when just starting out and may not be used. I also read about not to get too many figures to start with as otherwise an uphill task of painting them all becomes a mammoth task which I can understand (although applied more to wh)
Of the rule books above, I think your most economical option for getting started is the Mines of Moria rule book, if you can find it. It has several profiles with point values to get you started. Failing that, the One Rule Book would be my next go-to, again depending on if and how cheaply you can find it. If neither of those are looking like a good option, you can try to find the Return of the King rule book (not to be confused with the Return of the King Journeybook (http://www.games-workshop.com/gws/catalog/productDetail.jsp?catId=cat970018a&prodId=prod1140185), which will have profiles and scenarios but not the basic game rules). Any of those three will give you rules to play the game and several profiles, at least enough to build a very basic force for almost any faction (stock infantry + captain).


Just starting to get my head around the listings on ebay now, is 40 (inc delivery) a good price for the orginal LOTR it says it contains the following;
Contains: 128 page full colour rulebook, 3 ruined buildings, 4 dice, 8 Men of Gondor (all neatly painted), 16 Elves (8 neatly painted) and 24 Moria Goblins (8 neatly painted). Boxed; some shelf wear.
Obviously depends how neatly painted it is (can you strip them down if wanted?) and obvioulsy its the older version but for 40 it's a good starting point isn't it? Also if we got thenewer version could you still use parts of this set in the new one?
Here's the link
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Original-Lord-Rings-Strategy-Battle-Game-/271154042491?_trksid=p5197.m1992&_trkparms=aid%3D111000%26algo%3DREC.CURRENT%26ao%3 D1%26asc%3D14%26meid%3D5596900820855669344%26pid%3 D100015%26prg%3D1006%26rk%3D1%26sd%3D271154042491% 26
I would not get that set unless you feel it is worth it for the models alone, because that rule book is the very first edition of the game and only has stuff from the Fellowship of the Ring, as the other movies hadn't even been released when it was printed. It includes a limited set of profiles which pretty much boils down to some high elves and Numenoreans, some orcs, Moria goblins, wood elves, uruk-hai scouts, and the heroes from the Fellowship. There are no cavalry or siege rules.

The paint job on plastic models can be stripped pretty easily if you don't like the paint job on them. I use Simple Green, which is a cleaner that should be available in any hardware or home improvement store. I dilute it with a some water, fill a jar, and submerge the models in it overnight. Then the next day I scrub them with a toothbrush under running water and it gets most of the paint off. Be careful about other paint strippers on plastic models, as it can melt the plastic.

================================================== ===============================

Regarding different versions of the rules - while I personally do not feel much pressure or incentive to get the new hardcover rulebook, I think it will be expected that you have the most up-to-date rules if you plan on playing in stores, especially GW stores. As you have indicated that you wanted to play with your young son, I would imagine this isn't a huge priority and you'd be fine with an older, cheaper edition that are essentially the same rules. It seems like a fair chance that GW will release more updated rule books in the future, as well, so unless you think you'll want to do in-store games in the near future you would be fine familiarizing yourself with the game using older rules and getting whatever the current rules are if/when you do decide to start playing in-store.

Andy-001
15-02-2013, 14:05
Thank you so much for the detailed response and time given, much appreciated, just what I needed.
Few more questions, sorry....


How many dice are needed overall to play?

"As you have indicated that you wanted to play with your young son, I would imagine this isn't a huge priority and you'd be fine with an older, cheaper edition that are essentially the same rules". - Absoultly right, our Son Isaac is 5 in July, (start him young hopefully carry on as he gets older!) the only way I'm going to get the mrs. on board to give me time to play, is to involve Isaac (I haven't got the time personally to go into store to play with new friends) so I get to do something that I know I'll enjoy and spend time doing as well as get Isaac inviolved and entertain/occupy him too for a few hours over the weekend/holidays.

So yes, fine if older copy of the rules eg Mines of Moria Rule Manual if its basically got everything bar the stuff from The Hobbitt. Am I right in thinking, from your comments, there are differemnt editions of Mines of Moria rule manuel? as you say this be your second choice (after the hobbitt) but wouldn't get the mines of moria box set as its contains the first edition of the rule book that has supplements to update.

How do you know which are the the latest editions of the Mines of Moria Rule Manual?

There is a copy of the Mines of Moria rule book on ebay for 10 including postage, http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lord-of-the-Rings-Rule-Book-Mines-of-Moria-Warhammer-LOTR-Well-Used-oop-/321068633103?pt=UK_Toys_Wargames_RL&hash=item4ac12e8c0f

I'm just seeing if theres a free pdf I could download or would a local library have a copy do you think? (worth a try at least)

So if just got the rule book for 10 what else would I need? I can make some sort of board to play on with either some home made scenary (Isaac could help paint decorate the board) or shop brought (I think to get the 4 year olds interest need some hills and stuff rather than just green felt)

Select two factions (one evil, one good) and buy a box set of plastic infantry each. Get a generic hero for each as well. How much roughly
Dice

Then is that it to start?

As much as I want to, I personally couldn't at this moment, justify spending 50 on a book to start with and then have models ect to get before playing.

Thanks all again for the help

Whitwort Stormbringer
15-02-2013, 15:11
How many dice are needed overall to play?
A quick answer is that you'd probably be fine with 8 or so (maybe two or three of a different color to the rest, which can come in handy at times).

Most of the time, 5 or 6 is the most you'll need. Hand-to-hand combats are always divided into 1v1 or 1v2+, meaning it's infrequent that you'll have more than a couple of models in any given fight, and often only 1. If you're able to isolate and surround an enemy (the most models you can get around a man-sized opponent is 6, although the number of attacks can swell with spear support), then you'll end up rolling a lot of dice, though. You could, theoretically (if you've really got someone completely swarmed) need upwards of 24 dice, but at that point it may be easier to just roll the 8 dice you do have 3 times and keep track of the number of hits than to have a pile of dice on hand when you'll rarely need them all. The only other time you need many dice is if you have several archers that are all shooting at the same time.


Absoultly right, our Son Isaac is 5 in July, (start him young hopefully carry on as he gets older!) the only way I'm going to get the mrs. on board to give me time to play, is to involve Isaac (I haven't got the time personally to go into store to play with new friends) so I get to do something that I know I'll enjoy and spend time doing as well as get Isaac inviolved and entertain/occupy him too for a few hours over the weekend/holidays.

So yes, fine if older copy of the rules eg Mines of Moria Rule Manual if its basically got everything bar the stuff from The Hobbitt.
Cool, then yes, I would recommend Mines of Moria or The One Rule Book.


Am I right in thinking, from your comments, there are differemnt editions of Mines of Moria rule manuel? as you say this be your second choice (after the hobbitt) but wouldn't get the mines of moria box set as its contains the first edition of the rule book that has supplements to update.

How do you know which are the the latest editions of the Mines of Moria Rule Manual?
No, sorry, I must have miss-spoke. There are many different editions of the SBG rules, but there is only the one edition of the Mines of Moria rule manual, which for the record I don't personally own (I already had all of the fellowship characters, an army of goblins, and the ORB when the Mines of Moria box was released so it didn't hold much value for me). I do know, however, that it gives the basic rules for the game and several model profiles, certainly enough to get you started on building some armies. Someone else that has the book might be able to give you more detailed info on what profiles are inuded, but my understanding is that there are at least heroes and basic soldiers for most factions.


There is a copy of the Mines of Moria rule book on ebay for 10 including postage, http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lord-of-the-Rings-Rule-Book-Mines-of-Moria-Warhammer-LOTR-Well-Used-oop-/321068633103?pt=UK_Toys_Wargames_RL&hash=item4ac12e8c0f

I'm just seeing if theres a free pdf I could download or would a local library have a copy do you think? (worth a try at least)
That would be the book I'm thinking of. There may be online pdf's of it, you'd have to dig around though. I wouldn't hold my breath for the library having a copy, but I suppose there's an outside chance. If you're there, may as well ask or take a look. In my experience, libraries don't tend to carry rule books for games.


So if just got the rule book for 10 what else would I need? I can make some sort of board to play on with either some home made scenary (Isaac could help paint decorate the board) or shop brought (I think to get the 4 year olds interest need some hills and stuff rather than just green felt)
Other than models, dice, a tape measure, and scenery is all you'd need. Yeah, I recommend the green felt as a cheaper alternative to something like this (http://www.games-workshop.com/gws/catalog/productDetail.jsp?prodId=prod730814), just to give the appearance that your models are on a battlefield rather than a tablecloth, but even with the green felt you'd definitely want trees, rocky outcroppings, etc. so that your warriors can hide from enemy bowmen, have obstacles to maneuver around, and so forth. Another alternative is something like the Citadel Battlemat (http://www.games-workshop.com/gws/catalog/productDetail.jsp?catId=cat440158a&prodId=prod2060001), which is a flocked mat so it looks like a grassy field.


Select two factions (one evil, one good) and buy a box set of plastic infantry each. Get a generic hero for each as well. How much roughly Then is that it to start?

Just took a look at the UK page, it looks like a box of 12 infantry (10 for Easterlings or Isengard Uruk-Hai) is 15 GBP, and a command pack (which comes with a hero and a standard bearer) is 8.20 GBP, so about 50 GBP to get your two forces.

That's at full retail price, however there are many online retailers that sell Games Workshop products at a discount (often up to 20%). You typically have to call them on the phone, because GW doesn't let retailers have an online shopping basket (as far as I'm aware), but it's better than paying full price. You can also sometimes find the plastic models pretty cheaply on eBay, although that's not necessarily reliable. Metal minis tend to be expensive on eBay, especially if they came as part of a larger box set originally.


As much as I want to, I personally couldn't at this moment, justify spending 50 on a book to start with and then have models ect to get before playing.
Understood - I think it's definitely worth getting a cheap old rule book to try out the game and see how you like it. If playing at home, you can always tweak and add rules as you need to, and if you're enjoying it enough there's always time to get the updated books in the future.


Thanks all again for the help
No problem! I also sent you a PM - check the very top of the page on the right hand side and it should say that you have 1 notification.