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MiyamatoMusashi
23-03-2013, 11:45
I'm only a third of the way through this so far, but I wanted to get a thread started about it because IMO this is flippin' fantastic.

I think the author has had a few short stories printed; the only one I've read is Out Caste from the Advent Calendar 2012 (which is worth reading before you start this). I thought that was OK, took a somewhat cynical take on the Greater Good but not necessarily one I disagree with entirely, even if it focusses on a different view of it than I prefer.

So to Fire Caste, and the author gets to show what he can do without a 1000 word limit. Right from the first scene (among the best openings in any BL book?) it absolutely blew me away. PF is superb at creating memorable and believable characters, embuing them with convincing motivations and characterful mannerisms; Commissar Iverson, in the space of a few pages, has been seared into my imagination as though with a branding iron, along with the ghosts that haunt him; and the bitter, resentful Jhi'kaara from Out Caste makes her return. Indeed the cast (as opposed to caste) is impressive in scope, and the remarkable thing is pretty much all of them are unique and memorable; the only cookie cutter characters have a tendency to die within the same scene that they are introduced!

It quickly becomes apparent that PF's cynicism extends beyond just the Greater Good; the Imperial Glory is portrayed with just as jaded a viewpoint. I found this made me much more forgiving of our differing take on the GG, because it's clearly just part of a larger relentlessly doom-laden vision of the 40K galaxy, not a dismissal of the GG as I understand it. Indeed, his writing reminds me of nothing as much as GRR Martin in the sense that everyone and everything is well and truly screwed, but their trials and tribulations are so fascinating that I am desperate to read about them. This is grim, and it is dark; but it is far from the grimdark/grimderp 40K of cliche.

The author's writing style is precise and efficient, but evocative with it. Exposition scenes are intelligent and gripping, action scenes are brutal and remorseless. If this continues for the next two-thirds of the book, PF has every chance (in my view) of becoming as well-regarded as ADB or Dan Abnett. (This is certainly considerably better than Cadian Blood for example, though ADB really only got going with his second book). So far - the first 130 pages - gets rated Seven Stars (out of seven, of course). I can't recommend it highly enough.

PS - despite the title, this is not a Tau book, not as you might think it. The central characters that the story follows (so far at least) are Imperial. I assumed it would be written from a Tau viewpoint much like Shadowsun for example, but it's not. That's absolutely not a bad thing, but it's something I hadn't realised so wanted to pass it on to others too.

The bearded one
23-03-2013, 12:21
That's sounding interesting. I wass just off to pick up Last of Kiru's line, I think I'll grab this one along too. :)

Anakwanar
23-03-2013, 14:49
The bearded one - dont. I was excited too for the first 150 pages - but after that the story goes to downfall. Ending is miserable. The plot become disconnected. Its not a tau story at all. Its a bad book, not much worse for the Death of Antagonis, but still bad. The ending that should give us some answers doesnt give them at all. This book = lost time.

The bearded one
23-03-2013, 17:41
Oh, stop it you, you're making me all excited :D

burni
23-03-2013, 22:26
I finished it last night. Started okay, got good in the middle but then I didn't like the end to be honest. I won't spolt it but I was just disappointed with it.

There's very little Tau in there, which is also a bit disappointing but I did like the description of the death world. I found it really alien and different from the usual BL descriptions.

I was going to get Shadowsun but not sure if I will now.

shadowhawk2008
23-03-2013, 23:04
Different characters, different authors :-)

MiyamatoMusashi
24-03-2013, 00:12
I've just finished it. Loved it. I'd write more, but I need my beauty sleep...

...which I have now had. And to expand upon my initial statement, I loved it a lot.

Ignore the title completely. It's totally misleading. Tau (and various of their allies, including Loxatl) do feature, but it's not about them at all. Until the second half of the book, they're really just the bad guys in a purely Imperial novel. Even in the second half, the focus remains firmly on the Imperials. (Imagine it's called Shadows, which would have been a much more fitting title).

I was expecting a Tau story, but what I was really hoping for was just a good story, and this delivers that in spades. There's a definite Apocalypse Now feel to it all (with several direct references to Heart of Darkness), though it is far from a simple re-write; much like that book/film, it explores the psychology of men (and xenos) under combat stress, and how they cope. Short version: not well. This is a relentlessly grim vision, made all the worse by the supernatural terrors of the 40K universe.

The only real respect in which this was a Tau story was in exploring what can happen without the Ethereals around. Leaving aside the sillier conspiracy theories (PF has one of his characters speculate "I wonder why the Ethereals are needed", which is as far as that goes), the result is entirely appropriate: all the Tau continue following the Greater Good, they just disagree firmly on what that is; each viewing it according to their own prejudices. In fact, the Water caste plan is rather clever! Though would only work once, and is vulnerable to the Astartes approach. Still: each caste starts to believe that their own way of life is the most important, without denying that it becomes part of a greater whole. The Ethereals provide context and impartiality... they determine the Greater Good because that is their purpose in life, and where their skills lie... in a holistic system but where the component parts can act of their own volition, someone needs to provide guidance, or it all goes wrong. That's what the Ethereals do. Not "because pheremones".

There are tens of memorable characters here. Commissar Iverson is an absolute triumph; Lady Raven is another personal favourite; Colonel Cutler is brilliant. I could go on. The truly remarkable thing about it is the attrition rate: named characters, important characters, die at a terrifying rate.

The one character in the book who absolutely positively definitely deserved to die, survives (presumably). Nobody had time to go back and kill him!

I've heard some criticism of the ending, but it was more than satisfactory to me. All the various plans came together and thus inevitably interfered with one another and fell apart, people with varying degrees of understanding of the warp try to set things right and thus cause them to go wrong (bending the laws of space and time into the bargain), and the remorselessly bleak atmosphere that proved so entertaining throughout the book remained remorselessly bleak in the ending. Seems quite natural to me.

The only other dangling thread - apart from the Admiral - is why the coral temples were able to keep back the corruption that plagued the rest of the planet. I guess maybe that's just what temples do, and the indigenous peoples that built them did so to keep back the encroaching darkness; but then might that mean Templeton (...hmmm) may even have been cured of his infection and survived?

In summary, I stand by my earlier remarks. I couldn't put this down, despite Anakwanar's... differing views I would still strongly recommend it, and I will definitely be picking up future books by this author. In my mind he has made himself a candidate for forming a Trinity with ADB and Abnett as the best authors in the BL stable; if he can keep this up, of course... because this was superb.

burni
24-03-2013, 09:05
Different characters, different authors :-)

A very good point :)

I just feel wary of BL approach to Tau now. After Out Caste, I really had high hopes of a great Tau story but this was just an average IG one. Plus the fact the the short novella costs quite a bit for its page count puts me off too.

MiyamatoMusashi
24-03-2013, 09:08
I'd consider Shadowsun on its own merits (worth reading if you can borrow a copy, not worth the asking price).

FWIW I thought this was much better than an "average" IG novel, though. There are plenty of those around.

shadowhawk2008
24-03-2013, 12:20
A very good point :)

I just feel wary of BL approach to Tau now. After Out Caste, I really had high hopes of a great Tau story but this was just an average IG one. Plus the fact the the short novella costs quite a bit for its page count puts me off too.

Fair point! As is my tendency though, I'd still suggest considering it on its own merits. Not familiar with Cambell's work myself I don't think, but I'm looking forward to reading this. Going to a major local con in a couple weeks so saving up for that. Will most likely buy Shadowsun after that.

Asrai Syrion
25-03-2013, 07:56
I'm currently on page 211 of this book and am loving it

Its intelligent, insightful, dirty, real and visceral(think i'm repeating myself)

Can't put it down a true Hardcore Military Sci-Fi novel

So far its up their

Anakwanar
25-03-2013, 10:12
MiyamatoMusashi:
Ok, if you loved this book - please, explain to me the ending. WHO THE **** IS IVERSON?

MiyamatoMusashi
25-03-2013, 11:36
What I got from it is this:

They dragged the ship into the warp without Gellar fields. That left everyone on the ship entirely exposed to the denizens of the immaterium, who we can surmise may have been watching pretty closely on the basis that there's very strong hints that the planet they've just come from is heavily tainted (Nurgle and Khorne influences going on down there, at least). It seems to me, that one of said daemons used Iverson's form as a conduit back into reality, on his home planet in the past (it's Chaos, right?); thus planting the seeds for Colonel Cutler and Lady Raven to encounter "him" (complete with magma-blazing scars and daemonic power) in Trinity, triggering their banishment from their homeworld, and making everything else possible. (Not to mention leaving Arkan itself tainted).

Such an explanation is beautifully convoluted and Chaotic, and in keeping with the despairing tone of the novel (a "grimdark" 40K in the most positive sense). It is, of course, not the only possible explanation; and that also is consistent with the insanity of the story and the novel itself. There is intentional mystery here; I haven't felt the need for every question to be explicitly answered in a book, since I read children's stories. This is no fairy tale. It's Heart of Darkness except Kurtz isn't just a bit loony, there are genuine daemons. Iversons trip up a jungle river searching for a rogue Colonel (so far so cliched) ends up... going into outer space while actual gods treat mortals as their playthings. That's the triumph of this novel: it's a psychological thriller, exploring similar themes as HoD and Apocalypse Now, but reframed in the setting of a universe where, if you're insane, you're probably closer to understanding what's going on than those in full control of their faculties. (It brings to mind the classic 40K saying: "Only the insane have strength enough to prosper. Only those that prosper may truly judge what is sane"). Heh... after writing this post, I've just come across the author's blog post (http://www.blacklibrary.com/Blog/tau-be-or-not-tau-be.html) in which he references exactly that saying. I wasn't parroting what he said, honest - just turns out that my interpretation picked up exactly what he was trying to achieve, as far as I can tell!

Bolter porn this is not. It's a spiritual successor to Pawns of Chaos or Wine of Dreams; it has the same sense of characters struggling to cope with the reality in which they find themselves, a struggle which the reader (certainly in my case) can participate and celebrate. And for that reason I love it, it takes 40K back to its roots (while using 40K's newest faction, the Tau, as antagonists). If you're expecting Kaldor Draigo to turn up, quip a one-liner and tie up all the loose ends; or if (from the title) you're expecting an Ethereal to wave a Greater Good wand and everything works out OK; that's not what happens in this book. I'm not even saying such stories would necessarily be bad, but that's not what this is; and it's a remarkable success as a result, in my view.

...but it should have had a different title. That's my only criticism. I can't see that it can be considered a big one.

Anakwanar
25-03-2013, 13:27
Careful - Spoilers:
Ok thank you MiyamatoMusashi
, so it seems that our guy Iverson is possessed from the past- but he is younger then Cutler, how do you explain that? And he has too much personality for the possessed one. Ok so they all die? What happened to the ship? As for the first half of the book - where have the Templeton went? Another question about the the admiral - this is corrption - plain and simple - why the commissars and IG havent seen that? Are they all blind?

MiyamatoMusashi
25-03-2013, 15:58
Erm... OK...


so it seems that our guy Iverson is possessed from the past- but he is younger then Cutler, how do you explain that?

I don't think he is "possessed from the past". He wasn't on Arkan when Cutler and Lady Raven were in Trinity. I think that when the ship was taken into the warp, he (or maybe just his body, form, or simply his appearance) was taken back to Arkan, crossing time and space. A sort of psychic, daemonic future echo, a chaotic irony that Lady Raven was trying to prevent by killing Iverson (and everyone else on the ship), but which seems to have backfired on her.


Ok so they all die? What happened to the ship?

Yes, they all die. That seems quite clear, there's very little doubt? What happens to the ship is what usually happens to a ship that enters the warp without a Gellar field (ie. not something you want to be around to see for yourself... torn apart and/or possessed by daemons, eternal damnation, all the usual).


As for the first half of the book - where have the Templeton went?

He went into the coral temple. He's almost certainly dead, killed by the fungal infection. I suppose there might be an outside chance the protective powers of the temple managed to stave off the infection and heal him, but there's nothing to indicate this beyond supposition, and he certainly expected to die. This also seemed pretty clear in the text. Where do you think he went? :confused:


Another question about the the admiral - this is corrption - plain and simple - why the commissars and IG havent seen that? Are they all blind?

No, though a lot of them are mad and/or corrupt themselves. Most of the soldiers serving under him haven't even seen him; the few that have include the Confessor and a few attendants, all of whom worship him. Again, this was directly addressed in the text, why the confusion? Iverson and Reve could have killed him, or at least tried... but they would then inevitably have died themselves, so they (or at least Iverson) chose the more pragmatic course (and Reve followed his lead). A shame Iverson never kept his promise to go back and kill him, but I'm sure he'll pay the price at some point...

Asrai Syrion
25-03-2013, 18:07
Read some more and am still lovin it

The bearded one
25-03-2013, 18:29
I'm quickly finishing up the second half of the first heretic in order to read this one ;) I did read the first bit unto page 30 or so and it seemed pretty interesting. At the description of the fat aristocrat officer the image of Sam Tarly from game of thrones popped into my head, except of course with the personality you'd expect from a selfentitled aristo ;)

Asrai Syrion
25-03-2013, 21:34
MiyamatoMusashi:
Ok, if you loved this book - please, explain to me the ending. WHO THE **** IS IVERSON?

Ok not quite finished but here goes

When the witch first meets Iverson she think he looks younger, so the when the ship is pulled into the warp Iverson must be possesed and that same daemon is the one that is called into being at Trinity because as we all know time has no meaning in the warp ie ships translate hundreds of years before or after they set out

So whether Iverson survives as a daemon for a while or the Daemon ages him before being called to Trinity is anyones guess, maybe that daemon just uses his likeness because its on Iversons homeworld bit of irony you know

my two cents

dram
27-03-2013, 07:28
Kinda of annoyed that it ended up being a time warp story. I enjoyed it, but the ending made it feel like I wasted my time reading it.

Also, was anyone surprised that the tau warrior with the scar was barely in the book? She was in two short stories the author wrote and I thought for sure she would be a big part of this book, but she's in it for less than ten pages. It just felt like wasted potential. He should have made her Abel/mole instead of a character we meet in the last few pages of the book.

Asrai Syrion
27-03-2013, 07:58
But she was only just promoted and would not have had the authority to do what Abel did

I have now finished it and it is my joint favourite BL book of the year so far

Smart intelligent writing can't wait for his next book, got some high hopes

Zimfan
30-03-2013, 02:24
Finished the book about early this morning after making the mistake of deciding to read a chapter or to before sleep. I'd like to echo MiyamotoMusashi's description of it. When I had first heard about it I was expecting something a bit like Fall of Damnos, a precodex showcasing of an army about to be updated. Then I heard the Tau weren't the focus and was a bit wary but decided to give it a try after reading a few posts in this thread.

I really enjoyed it. The characters and the way the subplots weaved together. The slow descent of many of the characters as the world and situation cause already existing cracks in their sanity to widen. The way Chaos was presented as something horrifying rather than just providing big monsters to fight. I thought he did a good job portraying the Tau and the way the war on the blight of a world it's being fought on affect them, while still keeping them distinct from humans in personality. There were a few loose ends that could use some explaining but for the most part I thought the author left just the right things implied for the reader to connect.

I bought the digital version but I plan on getting a hard copy after my next paycheck. I'd definately like to see more 40k books like this one. It's anexcellent addition alongside the Black Library's more traditional military scifi offerings.




The only other dangling thread - apart from the Admiral - is why the coral temples were able to keep back the corruption that plagued the rest of the planet. I guess maybe that's just what temples do, and the indigenous peoples that built them did so to keep back the encroaching darkness; but then might that mean Templeton (...hmmm) may even have been cured of his infection and survived?


I could be wrong but I thought it was implied the natives didn't actually build the temples as the Imperials thought but that they grew out of those infected with that disease the admiral had. I remember the priest talking about how the Admiral's daughter in the later stages of the disease growing to cover the whole inside of an Imperial temple he kept her in, and they seemed to be implied to be alive in a way coral shouldn't be. Not sure why there were clear spots around them, though.

Quick question for those who have read the book.

Anyone get a Shadow Over Innsmouth feeling from the physical descriptions of the natives?

Soul Hunter
10-04-2013, 08:32
Decided to read this solely based on the comments here. Enjoying it so far, I like the description of Gue'vesa Pathfinders, in full Tau gear, and the Dorm 31 incident's description was very very creepy. Plenty of questions still in the air, but i'm only at Chapter 2 so far, so I'm looking forward to finding the answers.


SH

Horus Lupercal
10-04-2013, 08:38
I'm near the end now and its great.

I found the book a little slow to get going but once it did it really picked up the pace. Some fantastic themes in the book, from the way the tau have pulled the humans into this perpetual meat grinder to the taint of the world itself (so blatantly chaos tainted!)

Really looking forwards to the ending!

Silvertongue
11-04-2013, 10:18
The problem with this book is, as someone said before, that it has been sold as if it was a Tau book, which it is most certainly not. I bought it thinking it would be about Tau, or at least feature them more prominently... But alas, in this book, Tau are the token "twisted, convoluted" alien plot devices, and I found myself locked in a book about IG, something I've been carefully avoiding since I first got into the hobby (like 13 years ago), because I simply hate IG and IG-related novels. They bore me to death.
To me, it was yet another story of regular soldiers crossing a jungle, but with added Chaos (oh, Chaos in a novel about the Imperium, how original... apparently the xenos are not even fit to be a serious enemy).

So, if you enjoy Vietnam movies with a daemonic twist, you should definitely pick it up. If you're expecting it to have any insight about Tau society, their view of war or their pilosophy, you best keep your money in your wallet.

Horus Lupercal
11-04-2013, 17:08
Really? You hate the IG and find them boring?

An army that can literally have any theme you could possibly think of an you find that boring?!

(I'm not being condescending btw, genuinely intrigued!!)

I too bought it thinking the tau were a big part but I really ended up enjoying it none the less, I like my nam films too though so go figure lol.

Soul Hunter
11-04-2013, 20:40
Finished the book, loved the hell out of it.

http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/04/fire-caste-peter-fehervari-review-lord-night/

My thoughts, and i'll have some more once I can get some answers out of Peter Fehervari about some of the book's events.


SH

Anakwanar
12-04-2013, 07:50
Right now, after the Shadowsun and patient hunter i really enjoyed the kicking of Tau asses in this book, even on a smaller scale. Peter next time - lets Iversson crush dozens of Riptides with his hands, ok?
Anyway - the book is very hard to follow in some chapters, but i think its a decent book - yeah i changed my mind (Death of Antagonis is **** still) :D

DarkChaplain
12-04-2013, 08:23
yeah i changed my mind :D

So you actually read it now?

Horus Lupercal
12-04-2013, 08:47
I didn't like Antagonis either. I stuck with it to finish it but I didn't like it.

I see what you say about it being hard to follow, some of the sequencing could have done with a little clarification, maybe at the beginning of the chapter or paragraph just put "Trininty- 15 years ago"

Soul Hunter
12-04-2013, 09:21
I see what you say about it being hard to follow, some of the sequencing could have done with a little clarification, maybe at the beginning of the chapter or paragraph just put "Trininty- 15 years ago"
I think that was a good thing. It made the character's minds feel more disjointed, like their sense of reality is beginning to slip.


SH

Horus Lupercal
12-04-2013, 11:38
True. Every single character, even the Tau ones did seen bat s#### insane!!

Crazy Ivan
14-04-2013, 01:16
I loved it. Great characters, good story. Relatively little bolter porn,, lot of time spent in people's heads. And what heads they are... One thing I thought was going to bug me at first was the extremely obvious inspiriation for the Arkan, right down to the smallest details, but somehow this didn't matter all that much.

In particular the slow descent of Joyce from naive green recruit into fiery zealot culminating in him shouting "Blood for the Emperor" while gleefully slaugthering even his own men was very well done and rather disturbing. I was rather glad he died before going fully Khornate, actually.


True. Every single character, even the Tau ones did seen bat s#### insane!!

Only the insane prosper... It was interesting to see that most of the relatively few sane viewpoint characters (Major Waite, Sergeant Calhoun) get killed early on. And off page. All the others go crazy. Of the only two fairly "sane" viewpoint character after that, one was Roach (who was mostly sane from our point-of-view), and he didn't make it to the end either. (Whatever happend to Mr. Fish, by the way? I somehow hope he got away, so it wasn't only that vampire Admiral who survived the story.) Ironically, the sanest character making it to the end seemed to be the psyker...

Soul Hunter
14-04-2013, 08:06
(Whatever happend to Mr. Fish, by the way? I somehow hope he got away, so it wasn't only that vampire Admiral who survived the story.)
I assume he got away through the vents. I hope he survived as well, Mr. Fish was a cool character and surprisingly badass in that final fight. And I laughed from surprise when he spoke for the first time, I thought he was a dullard like Roach did, guess he was smarter than he looks.


SH

Soul Hunter
14-04-2013, 08:07
(Whatever happend to Mr. Fish, by the way? I somehow hope he got away, so it wasn't only that vampire Admiral who survived the story.)
I assume he got away through the vents. I hope he survived as well, Mr. Fish was a cool character and surprisingly badass in that final fight. And I laughed from surprise when he spoke for the first time, I thought he was a dullard like Roach did, guess he was smarter than he looks.


SH

Anakwanar
17-04-2013, 08:57
Roach and fish were an awesome couple :D Anyway - now Fire Caste stands as the only novel which gave tau empire a defeat (even a small one). In the light of other tau novels ans short stories, and new Codex - this is awesome novel - because tau lose

Soul Hunter
18-04-2013, 15:33
For anyone whose interested Peter Fehevari has answered some questions about Fire Caste on the Bolthole.

http://thebolthole.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2593

One or two things of note that he covers.


Jhi'kaara did indeed survive and will hopefully be revisited in the future in a novella that deals with the aftermath of the book and what happens to the survivors on Phaedra. Other survivors include Mr. Fish, Modine, Karjalen and his daughter and the mysterious Magos Caul.

And Fehevari created a very detailed lore and backstory for the Arkans and Providence, but barely used any of it. So there is the chance that Providence would be visited in another story, likely revolving around Investigator Kharter hunting the Dark Man, with Imperial and Chaos agents in the mix.


Really hoping that both of those things happen, they would be excellent reads. :D


SH

Horus Lupercal
18-04-2013, 15:34
Ooooo! Thanks for those finds!

Rogue Star
18-04-2013, 16:36
Roach and fish were an awesome couple :D Anyway - now Fire Caste stands as the only novel which gave tau empire a defeat (even a small one). In the light of other tau novels ans short stories, and new Codex - this is awesome novel - because tau lose

Um, Savage Stars? Ultramarines: Courage & Honour? Rogue Star? All of those feature Tau defeats. The very idea of the Tau is, even if they are defeated, they will quickly develop new technologies, and try again. You seem to be (rather childish, I must say), hoping someone will write them out of the background or something. Which is quite mystifying; they're one of the factions in a tabletop wargame, it's not like they ran over your dog.

MiyamatoMusashi
18-04-2013, 21:57
I would love to hear more about Providence, or Jhi'kaara. I'm less bothered about Phaedra; I kind of feel like the story has been told (though PF says he's got lots more in mind about the place). Mind you, I'll be honest, whatever he writes next I'll be buying.

MadDokta
20-04-2013, 19:35
Even though I was disappointed at first that the Tau weren't starring in the book as protagonists, I could not help but absolutely LOVE this book. I mean, I seriously think it's one of the best books Black Library has made and can not wait to see more from Peter Fehervari. And as a fan of the naive but ultimately good guys version of the Tau, I had little trouble accepting the Tau in this book as merely a splinter group of the Empire that have been driven into a dark and insane place by Phaedra and the grueling nature of the shadow war there. The planet is shown to affect various characters, why not affect the Tau as well? It might be a bit of a no-prize answer, but it's one way of allowing both viewpoints on the Tau to exist.

Really good book, and I seriously hope that Peter Fehervari does a sequel to this :) Or at the very least, write more about the Tau. And hopefully this time as the protagonists...

DarkChaplain
16-05-2013, 03:40
120 pages into this one, and loving it. This is a death world done right, a new regiment presented with lots of character even before getting to the interesting characters themselves.
This is definitely a grim novel, and so far everything has been set up nicely. Can't wait to read where this is headed, and who's gonna make it how far.

blackcherry
20-06-2013, 08:43
Sorry to resurrect this thread, but I finished the book yesterday. It was a really good novel. It was nice that for once, all the loose ends weren't explained or tied up. Though I'm not sure it fits the current 40k setting perfectly, I wish there more novels like it.

One more thing people keep talking about Raven as if she was the one in Cutler's head at the end- I get the impression it wasn't her at all, but a trick by the demon to help perpetuate itself. After all, the voice wanted everyone far, far away from Iverson in case he died- that doesn't seem like something Raven would want

MiyamatoMusashi
20-06-2013, 11:24
That reminds me. Can't PF write any quicker? I'm gagging for his next book.

The bearded one
01-07-2013, 20:42
Finished it, loved it, recommended it to others. I'll definately be on the lookout for new books from Fehervari, as this is something different entirely. An interesting take on the Tau and on what happens when the Tau are without guidance from an ethereal, rather than spontaneous Khorne-rage in all the firewarriors. The way the watercaste engineered the war into a selfsustaining slugfest between guard and turn-coats (so in essence just fighting itself) was quite clever, and befitting of how subtle the water caste supposedly can be. I found the description of the warfare on this bitter jungleworld very vivid and evocative as well. Despair and weariness clung to the pages. Another thing of note is that the way PF writes his battlescenes they don't bore as easily as they often tend to do, and I found his conversations to flow very well as well.

blackcherry
02-07-2013, 08:31
From a few interviews I've read, it seems that Fehervari spent quite a long time thinking about and building the world that the characters are in. Which explains why its so fantastically detailed and feels believable, unlike a lot of other BL novels where the setting is pretty much interchangable. The planet feel alive and like another character unto itself. Which I suppose is appropriate for a world that may be tainted by chaos :p

Soul Hunter
19-10-2013, 09:48
A cool new development regarding Fire Caste, there is a link to it in Peter Fehevari's short story The Crown of Thorns. After a discussion with the author over the short I figured out the link, and it's quite a good one.

(Only read if you don't want to work it out for yourself, and aren't bothered about spoilers for The Crown of Thorns.)


The link is the Undying Martyr from TCoT. A mysterious figure that appeared before the fortress-monastery of the Angels Resplendent and was taken in by the Chaplains. Soon after the Angels Resplendent became the Angels Penitent, a chapter that preaches a self-flagellating and penitent perversion of the Imperial Creed with their battlecry of "The Emperor Condemns!"

And when the protagonist describes the Undying Martyr whom he met briefly those who've read Fire Caste will recognise Confessor Yosiv Gurdjief, who managed to survive being stabbed by Cutler and somehow escaped Phaedra, the description of him hints that he isn't fully human anymore, and went on to spread his twisted version of the Imperial Creed to a Space Marine chapter that has embraced it very deeply.



SH

DarkChaplain
19-10-2013, 17:22
A cool new development regarding Fire Caste, there is a link to it in Peter Fehevari's short story The Crown of Thorns. After a discussion with the author over the short I figured out the link, and it's quite a good one.

(Only read if you don't want to work it out for yourself, and aren't bothered about spoilers for The Crown of Thorns.)


The link is the Undying Martyr from TCoT. A mysterious figure that appeared before the fortress-monastery of the Angels Resplendent and was taken in by the Chaplains. Soon after the Angels Resplendent became the Angels Penitent, a chapter that preaches a self-flagellating and penitent perversion of the Imperial Creed with their battlecry of "The Emperor Condemns!"

And when the protagonist describes the Undying Martyr whom he met briefly those who've read Fire Caste will recognise Confessor Yosiv Gurdjief, who managed to survive being stabbed by Cutler and somehow escaped Phaedra, the description of him hints that he isn't fully human anymore, and went on to spread his twisted version of the Imperial Creed to a Space Marine chapter that has embraced it very deeply.



SH

Glad I'm not the only one who was fascinated about this, and talked to him. I really, really want him to write more about these things.

MiyamatoMusashi
19-10-2013, 17:27
Where can one find "The Crown of Thorns"? [edit] Oh, it's one of the Angels of Death stories. I didn't bother with any of those... but I will now, I'll buy anything from this author sight unseen.

Nazguire
29-10-2013, 02:15
When I read A Crown of Thorns I didn't quite make the connection between the Confessor and the Angels Penitent. It didn't take me long to work out, however, that the Angels Penitent are about a bee's whisker away from turning to Chaos or wiping themselves out through a Chapter civil war.