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Nightmare84
14-05-2013, 09:19
This is a bit of a whinging thread about Gw aus. I have to say I have never seen a company that doesn't want to make money and help their situation as much as Gw. Firstly they close Sunday-Mondays across all stores in nsw ( possibly aus??). They close for one hour quite regularly on Tuesdays and Wednesdays for lunch.?!? And then like today I had made the hike into the city to go to their store and boom closed for stocktake.
Sure it was posted up on Facebook they were closed but why should I have to look online to see if a retail store is open beforehand?!?
What kind of company can't adequately staff to cover breaks so they don't have to close and can't oragnise outside of business hours stocktake like every other retail business in the world??

Is it just me that can't stand the situation gw Australia has taken since about November last year?

lijah_cuu
14-05-2013, 09:43
Is it a one man store?? Or is someone off sick??

I would assume that having to shut for one hour over lunch means that some poor sod is stuck there by him/herself. It would also explain having to shut for two days a week - I would think that these are the quietest trading days - as well as having to shut for a stock take...

blackcherry
14-05-2013, 09:45
Its a standard for all GW stores now. Even in the UK, most GWs I know are open only 3/4 days a week and even then at much reduced hours to what they used to be. When its a 1 man store, the guy has to have a few days off and they can't make him work more than 48 number of hours a week (I think) unless he signs to say hes ok with that.

Nightmare84
14-05-2013, 10:16
Australia doesn't have the one man stores like I've seen in Germany France etc. they are all 2-3 full time staff now. Closing for a stock take us ludacris. If your company isn't making sales you don't reduce it's operating hours to count your stock. I would never think to do that with my businesses

Jim
14-05-2013, 10:29
Australia doesn't have the one man stores like I've seen in Germany France etc. they are all 2-3 full time staff now. Closing for a stock take us ludacris. If your company isn't making sales you don't reduce it's operating hours to count your stock. I would never think to do that with my businesses

I would imagine stock takes are once per year? Not too much of an issue is it? Annoying you happened to go in on that one day...

I assume someone at HQ has figured out they'd pay their staff more in overtime to do the stocktake out of hours than they take on a regular mid-week day in sales...viewed like that it kinda makes sense, yes?

Jim

jinnai
14-05-2013, 10:46
Australia doesn't have the one man stores like I've seen in Germany France etc. they are all 2-3 full time staff now. Closing for a stock take us ludacris. If your company isn't making sales you don't reduce it's operating hours to count your stock. I would never think to do that with my businesses

Last time I checked, there are quite a fair few one man stores in Australia now. In fact my local (Warradale) and local when I go home to Canberra (Tuggeranong) are one man stores.

zoggin-eck
14-05-2013, 13:05
Wow, plenty of reasons to agree with the thread title, but I can't say I agree with you here.

It's pretty common for small stores of any sort to close for lunch (wish I got an hour, though!). Most GW stores I've seen have very few staff. If it's a one-man store, then fair enough closing. If it's a two-man store, then perhaps they can't/don't want to have one person operating on their own while the other eats, so just close up. Whatever the case, I think that's fine, and have worked in places that did, and did not.

Closing on stocktake is something I've done many times, so it's not exactly "like every other retail business in the world". They may just figure the money spent paying staff overtime isn't worth a days sales. I know people are inclined to hurry and do a poor job if they're made to work extra, rather than just on their usual day. It does suck going somewhere only to find that it's closed, but it just happens sometimes.

Abaraxas
14-05-2013, 14:03
Chatswood is a 1 man store, closed Monday-Tuesday and an hour for the poor git to have lunch.
I only work 5 days a week myself, and Im partial to my smoko and lunch-so I cannot get on this particular bandwagon:chrome:

Brother Asmodeus
14-05-2013, 15:28
The guy heading up the UK retail chain was from Oz and all his ideas are being passed around their other store chains due to his success in Oz.

Ahhhh G-Dubya, farting in one market and making all their other regions having to smell it since 1990...

Wiseman
14-05-2013, 22:46
Theres now plenty of 1 man stores around aus, the 1 hour lunch would be to cover time to do banking/other errands outside of the store (picking up stuff they need for the store and the like). Stocktakes were always done quarterly, with limited staff members its alot easier to close the store to get a proper count then to try and keep it open, and keep an eye on everything going on and counting at the same time.

In_Fiction
15-05-2013, 02:05
They couldn't just do the stock take a few hours before the store opens? Seems kinda odd (then again if business is slow it can be understandable, but still). But this is GW and they probably wouldn't want to pay the employees for extra time.

mav
15-05-2013, 08:17
Australia doesn't have the one man stores like I've seen in Germany France etc. they are all 2-3 full time staff now. Closing for a stock take us ludacris. If your company isn't making sales you don't reduce it's operating hours to count your stock. I would never think to do that with my businesses

That statement is not quite correct as I can say that in NSW at least, all but 1 store in NSW is now a 1 man operation. I was told this by a staff member at one of the GW stores I know.

Whilst it might be mildly frustrating that the local GW store is not open on a Sunday or Monday the staff need to have a least 2 days off for their weekend. They also need to have a lunch break and they cannot leave the store open if no-one is there ( i know I am stating the very obvious ).

Whilst these changes to the way GW operates can be frustrating for some ( or many ) people, we do not know why GW has taken this decision. We can only assume to know why and that wold be a very big assumption wouldn't it unless you have a crystal ball and can read people's minds.

I do not work for GW nor have I in the past. I am just a long term gamer of about 30 years located in NSW, Australia.

Just my 2 cents worth anyway.

Dr Zoidberg
15-05-2013, 08:53
In my uni days, I worked at a local video store. One some week days, I would regularly do 7-8 hour solo shifts from 0900 open to 1600/1700 when the evening team came on.

I didn't get to close for lunch. Don't necessarily agree with it, and recognise I was probably being shafted by the boss; but the concept of closing for an hour so I could eat a sandwich wasn't on the cards.

What's stopping a one-man GW employee from brining his lunch behind the counter and stay open? You can't tell me that he'd be SO busy that he couldn't find ten minutes to eat without having to serve customers.

Scammel
15-05-2013, 09:02
You can't tell me that he'd be SO busy that he couldn't find ten minutes to eat without having to serve customers.

Considering the range of duties a store manager is expected to fulfil (saying hello to those who walk in through the door, running impromptu introductory games, ensuring store events run smoothly etc.) I'd be very surprised if they could comfortably eat a sandwich in a single sitting.

zoggin-eck
15-05-2013, 11:40
In my uni days, I worked at a local video store. One some week days, I would regularly do 7-8 hour solo shifts from 0900 open to 1600/1700 when the evening team came on.

I didn't get to close for lunch. Don't necessarily agree with it, and recognise I was probably being shafted by the boss; but the concept of closing for an hour so I could eat a sandwich wasn't on the cards.

What's stopping a one-man GW employee from brining his lunch behind the counter and stay open? You can't tell me that he'd be SO busy that he couldn't find ten minutes to eat without having to serve customers.

Good for you. I've stayed at work overnight animating to meet a deadline plenty of times. Our examples have nothing to do with this topic, nor how a business should run.

Telling staff working for ordinary pay with screaming kids all day that they don't get a proper break is a great way to turn over staff.

Sorry, but this is the most absurd post I've seen in a long time. This isn't an owner operated milk bar or fish and chip shop.

Trasvi
16-05-2013, 04:56
I recently ran in to a GW staffer closing his store over lunch... pretty sure this was on a Saturday, and there was only one staff member there. Usually they've had two people.
It's not unusual for a one-man retail store here to close for a few minutes a day as the owner goes out. I see it a lot with boutiques, jewellery stores, books stores.
However for a multi-national chain in what is supposed to be the 'flagship' store, closing during a lunch hour seems remarkably short sighted.


* as mentioned by other posters, there are laws in Australia governing how many hours someone can work consecutively and over a certain time period without a break. I believe it might be 16 hours for longest shift, at least 15 minute break every 4 hours or 30 mins every 8 hours, and maximum 12 days out of 14. Its been a while since i worked retail. Some people do work longer, but employers can't force you to.

Treg Almighty
16-05-2013, 07:59
Aus has some pretty complex and strict labour laws which apply to retail workers so a break is a mandatory entitlement.

The city store is the flagship store in sydney though so I can relate to the op. I think its more because of the overall state of gw au pricing that is causing a slowdown and a reduction in openong hours and staffing. It also doesnt help that an independent stockist with a 10% discount on gw stock has opened right above the gw store.

esk34
16-05-2013, 09:32
Aus has some pretty complex and strict labour laws which apply to retail workers so a break is a mandatory entitlement.

The city store is the flagship store in sydney though so I can relate to the op. I think its more because of the overall state of gw au pricing that is causing a slowdown and a reduction in openong hours and staffing. It also doesnt help that an independent stockist with a 10% discount on gw stock has opened right above the gw store.

Is the Indy open 7 days a week? Do they shut the door for lunch? Because if the answer is yes then no, a small independent operator is able to better meet customer demand than a muiltinational. Kinda sad hey.

It is this kind of thing that makes me think they should just drop Australia completely. Well at least the stores anyway.

Brother Asmodeus
16-05-2013, 10:12
I would also ask anyone else posting here working in a sector other than retail? The reason I ask this is because if you were asked by your boss to... stop eating your lunch to finish writing a report/lay more bricks/take another call/fix that oil leak etc whether you would be happy to do so?

People think the poor people who end up working in retail should be treat like peasants and serfs by their bosses and customers alike. Its a ****** job and these poor red shirts need their legally allowed breaks too.

blackcherry
17-05-2013, 09:36
In my uni days, I worked at a local video store. One some week days, I would regularly do 7-8 hour solo shifts from 0900 open to 1600/1700 when the evening team came on.

I didn't get to close for lunch. Don't necessarily agree with it, and recognise I was probably being shafted by the boss; but the concept of closing for an hour so I could eat a sandwich wasn't on the cards.

What's stopping a one-man GW employee from brining his lunch behind the counter and stay open? You can't tell me that he'd be SO busy that he couldn't find ten minutes to eat without having to serve customers.

Whilst I'm not quite sure on Australian laws (though it looks (http://www.fairwork.gov.au/industries/accommodation-liquor-and-gaming/hours-of-work-rosters-and-breaks/pages/breaks.aspx) like they are in line with UK laws for the most part), but in the UK, if you work over a certain amount of time for a company (i.e. you aren't self employed) by law you have to have a break period and the employee cannot be expected to just work through lunch (though I know a lot of people do get guilt tripped into doing that in retail).

So, its perfectly normal and legal for a employee to want to have time off site during his shift where he can get a drink/food, go for a walk etc.

I'm betting your boss didn't pay you for those lunch breaks you worked through.

Dr Zoidberg
22-05-2013, 10:50
I would also ask anyone else posting here working in a sector other than retail? The reason I ask this is because if you were asked by your boss to... stop eating your lunch to finish writing a report/lay more bricks/take another call/fix that oil leak etc whether you would be happy to do so?


Often don't have much of a choice unfortunately. I usually end up having lunch at my desk, reading through some report or the other. I'm not expected to - I am entitled to an hour's lunch break - but I've got so much to do that taking time out for lunch really isnt a luxury. And to more specifically answer your question, my boss often comes to me with requests while I'm scarfing lunch. He's apologetic about it, but he's deadlines to meet too.



I'm betting your boss didn't pay you for those lunch breaks you worked through.

How do you mean? I was never formally given a lunch break. If I worked 7 hours, I got paid for 7 seven hours. I was simply expected to find 10 minutes to eat lunch between serving customers or doing other tasks. There was no prescribed 'lunch time' where I was off the clock.

Like I said above, I don't agree with it and recognise I was being screwed, but thats how it was. My point was closing the store because I was the only staff member on wasn't a luxury. I was there to ensure the store was open, customers could come in, and the owner make money. If I've closed up for 30 minutes to eat, that's 30 minutes of customers who didn't get served, 30 minutes of trade that didn't happen, and 30 minutes of income my boss didn't make.

How does that affect me? Well, if it keeps happening daily, customers slowly drift away as they cannot rely on us to be open, the store closes, and I'm out of a job. So its in my best interest to see that store open and serving customers as much as I can.

DYoung
22-05-2013, 11:42
I've had this problem. Went to the city GW to pick up an order and found it was closed for lunch. No sign or anything saying how long they'd be and it had taken me an hour to get there so I waited around. Came back an hour later and there were THREE employees there; two to sit around and one to harrass me to buy stuff.

IJW
22-05-2013, 15:20
Like I said above, I don't agree with it and recognise I was being screwed, but thats how it was. My point was closing the store because I was the only staff member on wasn't a luxury. I was there to ensure the store was open, customers could come in, and the owner make money. If I've closed up for 30 minutes to eat, that's 30 minutes of customers who didn't get served, 30 minutes of trade that didn't happen, and 30 minutes of income my boss didn't make.

To be honest, I'm struggling to see the relevance of your previous employer forcing you to work illegally-long periods has to how GW run their retail chain.

Now, having the staff member's lunch break be at office hours lunch time instead of just before/just after is another question...

TheMav80
22-05-2013, 15:55
I would also ask anyone else posting here working in a sector other than retail? The reason I ask this is because if you were asked by your boss to... stop eating your lunch to finish writing a report/lay more bricks/take another call/fix that oil leak etc whether you would be happy to do so?

People think the poor people who end up working in retail should be treat like peasants and serfs by their bosses and customers alike. Its a ****** job and these poor red shirts need their legally allowed breaks too.

I worked at a soup and sandwich type place where I worked 7am-2pm with no break in there.

I work at a hospital now and there have been plenty of times I did not get to take time to eat.

In the state I live in employers are not required to give breaks to anyone over the age of 16. They can also make it mandatory (at any time) that you work over-time. They still have to pay you time and a half for that, obviously.

anchorbine
22-05-2013, 16:10
It's always enjoyable to read posts by people who have no real clue how retail works, or the laws pertaining to breaks and such, or further, how companies respond to varying laws in varying states and countries. In many states, a lunch break is mandatory, period. A company has no say in whether or not the employee can or can't have a lunch break. If they fail to provide a lunch period, they are violating a labor law. Further, many large companies in an effort to achieve some consistency, will follow the strictest of the states labor laws across the board, regardless of where the location is. So, even if there is no lunch break mandated, the company is providing one regardless. I will say I do find it odd that a store with multiple staff members would close for lunch though, that makes no sense.

Mastodon
22-05-2013, 21:31
It's always enjoyable to read posts by people who have no real clue how retail works, or the laws pertaining to breaks and such, or further, how companies respond to varying laws in varying states and countries. In many states, a lunch break is mandatory, period. A company has no say in whether or not the employee can or can't have a lunch break. If they fail to provide a lunch period, they are violating a labor law. Further, many large companies in an effort to achieve some consistency, will follow the strictest of the states labor laws across the board, regardless of where the location is. So, even if there is no lunch break mandated, the company is providing one regardless. I will say I do find it odd that a store with multiple staff members would close for lunch though, that makes no sense.

Dependent on some laws, it can be illegal to be working on your own due to safety concerns. Ie if your coworker wanders over to the shop for half an hour to eat lunch, and you trip and smack your head on a shelf you could be dead by the time he gets back.

Thats the only reason I can think of for them shutting a shop with multiple people in. But 3 is strange, surely they should have just staggered their breaks.

Wiseman
23-05-2013, 02:05
If two were sitting around and one served you, I'm gonna bet that the two sitting around weren't actually working that day, and instead going in to the store to do some of their own Hobby.

Konovalev
23-05-2013, 14:48
I would also ask anyone else posting here working in a sector other than retail? The reason I ask this is because if you were asked by your boss to... stop eating your lunch to finish writing a report/lay more bricks/take another call/fix that oil leak etc whether you would be happy to do so?

Where I work, I need to be able to respond to emergency requests and so while I may not be happy about dropping lunch to work on something, I wouldn't hold it against anyone because it's my job to respond to such incidents.

As for working through lunch/breaks in general. I don't think it's uncommon that an employee might be faced with the decison to either: A)work through or skip lunch/break, or B)Risk being docked on their performence review for having bad time management and prioritising skills, Boss noting that something was late and giving that person a mental strike, etc. That's just life it seems. Sometimes you are just going to find yourself in a position where either through your own inefficiency, or through the sheer amount of work suddenly dropped on you(perhaps thanks to the inefficiency of others) that you will need to skip/work through lunch/break to get it done.

Worldeaters
23-05-2013, 22:13
In the uk if you work 4 hours or longer you are legally required to be given a break (due to record unemployment at the moment 3.75 hours is the new shift of choice in retail) unless 1 man stores are run on a self employed basis GW would have to have a break time in place for its staff, imagine someone from the council walks in and asks if he's on his own, if he says yes they can ask to see his contracted break time. If he doesn't have one GW would be in trouble.

Also, if you are working alone wouldn't you wanna lock the door to have a dump in peace 😜

Kalidane
24-05-2013, 13:34
It's always enjoyable to read posts by people who have no real clue how retail works, or the laws pertaining to breaks and such, or further, how companies respond to varying laws in varying states and countries. In many states, a lunch break is mandatory, period. A company has no say in whether or not the employee can or can't have a lunch break. If they fail to provide a lunch period, they are violating a labor law. Further, many large companies in an effort to achieve some consistency, will follow the strictest of the states labor laws across the board, regardless of where the location is. So, even if there is no lunch break mandated, the company is providing one regardless. I will say I do find it odd that a store with multiple staff members would close for lunch though, that makes no sense.

It's always enjoyable to read posts by people who have no real clue how the real world works.

I worked for 4 years without a lunch break. The law here requires a minimum 30 minute break after 5 hours work. So that was illegal. It's quite possible that a piece of paper exists somewhere that stipulated when my lunch break was to be taken.

Working in a two man team, there was no way either of us could go for a stroll for half an hour. Of course, it was the personal choice of every person who ever worked that shift to never have a break.

Actually it would be a pretty simple prosecution to bring but who would destroy their relationship with their employer in such a manner? Working anywhere in the same industry would be off the cards after that.

PrehistoricUFO
24-05-2013, 13:46
I'm a baker. I work sometimes 9 hours in a kitchen, on my feet all day in the blazing heat, hauling and lifting super-heavy dough and I normally don't take a single break to keep up with the work load of production. Anyone working in the food industry (real food, not fast food mind you), can attest to this sort of environment.

The odd times I go into my local GW, the staff literally do nothing but sit and chat with the regulars at the hobby table with the occasional standing up to approach a customer. It's probably one of the easiest jobs on this entire PLANET. I've heard the staff there bicker over break staggering before and it blows my mind. Break from WHAT exactly? Softies, they'd never make it in a tough workplace. I have no sympathy for even the one-man stores, I could eat that job for breakfast 7 days a week. I'll bet half the apologists in this thread are unionized, but that's a whoooooooole other story and way off-topic.

Now if you'll excuse me, I require several minutes to climb down the ladder off my high horse.

anchorbine
24-05-2013, 15:33
It's always enjoyable to read posts by people who have no real clue how the real world works.

I worked for 4 years without a lunch break. The law here requires a minimum 30 minute break after 5 hours work. So that was illegal. It's quite possible that a piece of paper exists somewhere that stipulated when my lunch break was to be taken.

Working in a two man team, there was no way either of us could go for a stroll for half an hour. Of course, it was the personal choice of every person who ever worked that shift to never have a break.

Actually it would be a pretty simple prosecution to bring but who would destroy their relationship with their employer in such a manner? Working anywhere in the same industry would be off the cards after that.

I actually have a very good idea of how the real world works. We however are talking about retail, not construction, interning as a physician, serving in the military or selling real estate. In the United States, there are very clear laws about breaks and lunch breaks. If a company fails to adhere to the labor laws, they can be fined or sued. Numerous retail companies now pay their managers per hour, directly as a result of many lawsuits brought forth and won by employees who as managers, were doing exactly the same things as their employees, thus the definition of manager didn't really hold. Now, instead of being allowed to work a manager 65 hours a week for a salary with no overtime, they must pay them per hour and have to pay overtime for over 40 hours.

As to the ease of the job, retail comes with pressure that isn't necessarily tied to physical labor. Some places pay you on commission, thus if your sales are flat or poor for whatever reason, you may earn minimum wage. Some places may pressure you big time to hit some achievable or possibly not achievable quota, with the threat of termination or cut hours if you can't meet their quota. As to "destroying" your relationship with your employer, in most cases, lost productivity from a lunch break simply gets replaced since the missing 30 minutes reappears at the end of the shift. Further, it certainly hampers productivity if you can't stop to recharge your batteries halfway through the day.

To each his own, if you want to work 10 hour days with no lunch break, don't care to inform the authorities that your employer is failing to offer fair, reasonable, and lawful work conditions, that's up to you.

TheMav80
24-05-2013, 21:27
I actually have a very good idea of how the real world works. We however are talking about retail, not construction, interning as a physician, serving in the military or selling real estate. In the United States, there are very clear laws about breaks and lunch breaks. If a company fails to adhere to the labor laws, they can be fined or sued. Numerous retail companies now pay their managers per hour, directly as a result of many lawsuits brought forth and won by employees who as managers, were doing exactly the same things as their employees, thus the definition of manager didn't really hold. Now, instead of being allowed to work a manager 65 hours a week for a salary with no overtime, they must pay them per hour and have to pay overtime for over 40 hours.

As to the ease of the job, retail comes with pressure that isn't necessarily tied to physical labor. Some places pay you on commission, thus if your sales are flat or poor for whatever reason, you may earn minimum wage. Some places may pressure you big time to hit some achievable or possibly not achievable quota, with the threat of termination or cut hours if you can't meet their quota. As to "destroying" your relationship with your employer, in most cases, lost productivity from a lunch break simply gets replaced since the missing 30 minutes reappears at the end of the shift. Further, it certainly hampers productivity if you can't stop to recharge your batteries halfway through the day.

To each his own, if you want to work 10 hour days with no lunch break, don't care to inform the authorities that your employer is failing to offer fair, reasonable, and lawful work conditions, that's up to you.

It's also possible that he works in a state, as I do, where it is not illegal to make someone work without breaks and forced overtime.

Only 8 states in America require employers to give you a break. Of those 8, two of them only require breaks just long enough to use the restroom. In addition, in about half the states employers can fire employees at any time for any reason (a handful of exceptions apply; race, religion, etc.)

Ben
26-05-2013, 10:24
It's probably a bad idea to be comparing labour practices in the US with labour practices in other countries. The US very simply don't have things like paid vacation, breaks, protections from unfair dismissal, etc, that countries in the developed world (Europe, Canada, Australia, etc) have.

zoggin-eck
26-05-2013, 13:03
Look, I think it's pretty pointless to get too excited over whether or not people we don't know are entitled to a proper lunch break, and the usual "that's how it works/doesn't work where I live" arguments don't help much when it's an international forum. The fact is, the store mentioned in the opening post is acting pretty much like any similar retail store does, and being closed one day a year and staff eating isn't Earth-shattering news. I understand this isn't the case in all industries, and it certainly can be annoying when you see people sitting around, supposedly "working".



Now if you'll excuse me, I require several minutes to climb down the ladder off my high horse.

You certainly do mate!

I've had enough different jobs (no time for union nonsense :)), some easy, some honest enough and some very hard. Saying you could "eat that job for breakfast 7 days a week" on the internet won't impress anyone. I save my put downs for people who genuinely refuse to work, anyway. Working at GW has always looked easy enough, but unless I was in a position to turn that awful music they seem to love playing off, I wouldn't consider it for a second!

(I know through living with a baker what a thankless, difficult and altogether hot job that can be! Made me so guilty working an office job at the time.)

mulkers
27-05-2013, 05:59
If two were sitting around and one served you, I'm gonna bet that the two sitting around weren't actually working that day, and instead going in to the store to do some of their own Hobby.

And just thought it would be cool to wear their uniforms while they were there too.

Wiseman
27-05-2013, 06:11
And just thought it would be cool to wear their uniforms while they were there too.
Theres no mention them being in uniform (also GW Australia doesn't have a uniform outside of wearing a collared shirt, long pants, enclosed shoes and a lanyard....)

mulkers
27-05-2013, 06:20
Theres no mention them being in uniform (also GW Australia doesn't have a uniform outside of wearing a collared shirt, long pants, enclosed shoes and a lanyard....)

I haven't been to a GW store for a few years, but a red polo with the GW logo embroided on it is the main part of the uniform. How would he have known they were employees if they weren't in uniform? I think it would be a bit incredulous for him to personally recognize the staff, but not know that they close for lunch.

Wiseman
27-05-2013, 06:28
I haven't been to a GW store for a few years, but a red polo with the GW logo embroided on it is the main part of the uniform. How would he have known they were employees if they weren't in uniform? I think it would be a bit incredulous for him to personally recognize the staff, but not know that they close for lunch.

No such uniform anymore, at least not when i stopped managing a store last year.
If the hours have changed recently, which has been happening with a few stores, its quite possible that he does know the staff, but wasn't aware of the changes, some staff stick around for years.

mulkers
27-05-2013, 07:14
No such uniform anymore, at least not when i stopped managing a store last year.
If the hours have changed recently, which has been happening with a few stores, its quite possible that he does know the staff, but wasn't aware of the changes, some staff stick around for years.

Well there you go.

PrehistoricUFO
27-05-2013, 20:25
Here in Canada, their uniforms are black/very dark blue polos with the GW logo on the upper left breast and the website on the back, with pants and shoes being black. It looks pretty sweet actually, I'd love to own a couple of those shirts.