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Alex_H
11-08-2013, 22:01
So, after a enjoyable few months, after putting it off numerous times, I am slowly approaching the end of reading Wheel of Time.

Have to be honest, one of the best series of books I have ever read..... And now I find myself looking at a literary black hole, with no idea what to read next.

So the question is to you all, what can I read now?

Any recommendations?

Oh and please don't suggest Game of Thrones - I am deliberately not reading them, as I am enjoying not knowing what's coming in the TV series.

ForgottenLore
11-08-2013, 22:56
The assassin and liveship trader books by Robin Hobb are excellent.

Hellebore
11-08-2013, 23:26
The assassin and liveship trader books by Robin Hobb are excellent.

+1

Yes, yes they are. An author that knows how to put characters through tortuous events in a believable way rather than Terry 'how can I contrive to stick my characters into the most ridiculously improbable horrible circumstances ever!?' Goodkind... :eyebrows:

Early Feist is good. I'm a sucker for Eddings (it's not super highbrow, but very entertaining).

Hellebore

Lothlanathorian
11-08-2013, 23:57
The First Law Trilogy and everything that follows it so far by Joe Abercrombie.

And GoT is inferior to ASoIaF.

Mr. Shine
12-08-2013, 00:44
Would also vouch for Robin Hobb's works. I wasn't such a fan of her Soldier Son trilogy, but her Farseer, Liveship Traders and Tawny Man trilogies are all excellent (and are a trilogy of trilogies).

Following on from them is her Rain Wilds Chronicles which I haven't really got into, but have been meaning to. She's really lovely, too, writing me a brief letter and giving me an embossed leather bookmark as a birthday gift on request from a friend of mine.

Caiphas Cain
12-08-2013, 02:31
Eddings and Robin Hobb are both really good authors, I'll second those recommendations. Also, Hyperion by Dan Simmons is so ******* awesome. That book is seriously one of the best I've read in a long time.

ctsteel
12-08-2013, 03:53
Peter F Hamilton - two different series - the Night's Dawn series, and the Commonwealth/Void sagas.
Great reads.

Also, a series that I read many years ago (still need to pick up the third book on ebay for my planned re-read) - the Winter of the World trilogy by Michael Scott Rohan.

Grim1
12-08-2013, 04:15
I loved the assassin and liveship taders by hobb, the early feist is also fab., Stephen Donaldson wrote the chronicles of Thomas covenant which is one of the early fantasy greats, I also enjoyed the belgariad books by eddings

AsleepByDay
12-08-2013, 10:53
I'd suggest the lost fleet book series as I found them enjoyable to read.

Mockingbird by Walter Trevis was an interesting read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mockingbird_%28Tevis_novel%29

Nomrana Est
12-08-2013, 11:50
Peter F Hamilton - two different series - the Night's Dawn series, and the Commonwealth/Void sagas.
Great reads.

Got to agree with this. Some of the greatest space opera stuff right there. Beautifully crafted, and well worth it. Might also suggest Iain M. Banks as well. Pretty much anything Culture related by him is fantastic.


I'd suggest the lost fleet book series as I found them enjoyable to read.

Although kinda tacky, they're decent. Good way to kill some time, although the characters can tend towards one-note wonders at times. However, the inter-fleet politics are handled very deftly.

As you've said you don't want to read ASoIaF, I'd go with these. Maybe pick up The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z if you can find them. Superbly written, and creepy with it.

Lothlanathorian
12-08-2013, 12:16
I wouldn't go so far as to call WWZ and the ZSG 'superbly written.' 'Poorly written' is a better phrase for them.

Not bad ideas, just, poorly executed. I'm very much not a fan of Max Brooks. As with all things, obviously, ymmv.

BigbyWolf
12-08-2013, 16:54
The First Law Trilogy and everything that follows it so far by Joe Abercrombie.

^For fantasy, totally this.^


Peter F Hamilton - two different series - the Night's Dawn series, and the Commonwealth/Void sagas.
Great reads.

^And this for Sci-fi.^

Also, other strong contenders for Fantasy are Russell Kirkpatrick's stories set in the same world; The Fire of Heaven and Broken Man trilogies.

scavenseer
13-08-2013, 07:51
I would reccomend the Terry Goodkind and Raymond E Feist books, both epic in scale!

Lars Porsenna
13-08-2013, 18:51
If you're reaching the end of Wheel of Time, and liked the last few books, The Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson might be a good choice. So far I have only read these and his (unrelated) Warbreaker, and the cool thing about them is he establishes some pretty unique "Magic" systems with a lot of hard rules the characters must abide by. Really enjoyed them (Warbreaker was great IMHO).

Damon.

ColShaw
13-08-2013, 21:00
Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn by Tad Williams (The Dragonbone Chair, Stone of Farewell, To Green Angel Tower). Epic (and VERY dark) fantasy. Slow to start, but if you made it through WoT, that won't bother you.

Hellebore
14-08-2013, 05:18
Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn by Tad Williams (The Dragonbone Chair, Stone of Farewell, To Green Angel Tower). Epic (and VERY dark) fantasy. Slow to start, but if you made it through WoT, that won't bother you.

God I read that a decade ago. It wasn't bad, but it was slow. WoT seemed to meander but MST was just slow.

I've enjoyed the Honor Harrington space opera series. It gets a bit Mary Sue, but the setting is cool. She just plays the 'brilliant upstart officer that figures out all the winning moves' character with flaws that turn out to be strengths etc.

Hellebore

Commodus Leitdorf
14-08-2013, 13:14
Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn by Tad Williams (The Dragonbone Chair, Stone of Farewell, To Green Angel Tower). Epic (and VERY dark) fantasy. Slow to start, but if you made it through WoT, that won't bother you.

I second this! The beginning is slow...and it is a LONG series. I mean book three of the trilogy is in two parts and each book is bigger then the first two parts....but once it gets going I couldn't put it down. Alternatively, if you don't want to read a long series read War of the Flowers. By far my favorite book from him.

As for Goodkind...I wouldn't read past book 4. Not to get to much into why, but he is very heavy handed with his own particular political views once book 5 hits. (and I've read the whole series too...mostly because I loved Kahlan as a character, not so much Richard).

ChromeZephyr
14-08-2013, 17:39
Heh, I'm back up to Fires of Heaven after waiting until Sanderson finished the series before I read it straight through again; got to Path of Daggers while they were still being written and got tired of having to re-read all of them over and over. I will second the notion of reading Sanderson's other books, Elantris was his first and a very good read. The Mistborn trilogy is very good, as well.

If you're interested in a complete change of pace I would suggest the Takeshi Kovacs trilogy by Richard K. Morgan. Altered Carbon (the first book) is one of my favorite books, ever. It's a noir detective story mixed with hypertech. Broken Angels and Woken Furies are more sci-fi/military fiction but are still enjoyable.

If you're more about the fantasy, I would echo the suggestion of early Eddings and Feist. The Belgariad is comfort-food fantasy, and so long as you quit after The King's Buccaneer Feist is a great read.

Zink
16-08-2013, 04:14
I'm planning on trying to read all the Wheel of Time some time this winter. Right now I'm reading some WW2 history and next up is the lost fleet books because of the reccomendations here and on some other forums. I'll toss out the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher as my contribution. I read all of them earlier this year and really liked them.

Odin
16-08-2013, 13:25
The First Law Trilogy and everything that follows it so far by Joe Abercrombie.


Absolutely, this.

My favourite author at the moment, and I can't wait for the next one.

ChromeZephyr
16-08-2013, 14:46
I'll toss out the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher as my contribution.

Oh, wow. How did I miss recommending the Dresden Files? Great stuff.

Mr. Shine
18-08-2013, 22:39
As for Goodkind...I wouldn't read past book 4. Not to get to much into why, but he is very heavy handed with his own particular political views once book 5 hits. (and I've read the whole series too...mostly because I loved Kahlan as a character, not so much Richard).

I'd agree with this, though having only read up to book 6. I found the story sort of spiralled into an epic in rambling, near-ridiculous nature :(

mattjgilbert
19-08-2013, 11:27
The Deverry novels by Katherine Kerr are a really good series of fantasy books.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Kerr#Deverry_novels

shelfunit.
19-08-2013, 20:27
The Stainless Steel Rat series by Harry Harrison, great fun sci-fi. I haven't read Bill the Galactic hero (same author) yet,but that is supposed to be pretty good as well

MLP
19-08-2013, 23:49
Some great suggestions here!

For sci fi I would recommend anything by Neal Asher. The Skinner is amazing.

Commodus Leitdorf
20-08-2013, 13:28
I'd agree with this, though having only read up to book 6. I found the story sort of spiralled into an epic in rambling, near-ridiculous nature :(

Lol! Trust me, you have no idea just how rambly and repetitive it gets...I mean book 6 was the nail in the coffin for me but I loved Kahlan so I kept reading.

Another one I enjoyed is the Chronicles of the Black Company by Glen Cook. Its basically written from the perspective of a mercenary company that gets involved in some crazy stuff. I enjoyed it even if it just throws you in with no explanation at all!

brightblade
21-08-2013, 10:35
Just read them again. Once you have got to the ending you will want to just to see what you missed.

A superb ending. The last book had me crying, laughing and cheering in turn.

I am on Fires of Heaven again and am thrilled at the nuances I am getting that slipped by. Now I know how it ends. . .

Robin Hobb is superb and the Rain Wilds Chronicles is shaping up nicely.

ColShaw
21-08-2013, 13:29
Just read them again. Once you have got to the ending you will want to just to see what you missed.

A superb ending. The last book had me crying, laughing and cheering in turn.

I am on Fires of Heaven again and am thrilled at the nuances I am getting that slipped by. Now I know how it ends. . .

Y'know, I tried to start again, now that the series has an end (I tapped out at book 6 last time).

I couldn't even make it halfway through book 1.

The main issue was wanting to punch every female character right in the face. I don't like books that make me feel misogynistic. I'm afraid I'm done with Jordan.

blackcherry
21-08-2013, 13:47
Could start on the Culture series by the late Ian Banks. Very good sci-fi novels that explore how a human society of the future that have eliminated all problems would function in a larger setting of space.

Matrim_Cauthon
21-08-2013, 17:14
As a WoT aficionado (I've read the first ten about six times now) I also recommend Joe Abercrombie. If you like complexity and keeping track of characters (if you like WoT that's a given, no?) I would read George RR Martin or perhaps Steven Erikson. Terry Goodkind is long but really simple, quite the opposite of WoT.

The Dresden Files get a +1 too... not exactly your typical fantasy, but fun reads!!

captain strongfist
21-08-2013, 22:48
I'd recommend Katherine Kerr and the Derry set as well. Really great setting and characters. Also read David Gemmels books, for heroic fantasy you can't go wrong. Another great set is Bernard Cornwalls warlord set. An amazing retelling of the Arthurian legend.

ColShaw
22-08-2013, 00:43
I second Bernard Cornwell's Warlords trilogy (The Winter King, Enemy of God, Excalibur).

leboy001
02-09-2013, 00:14
This is kind of a depressing thread. Having read WoT 2-4 times (i have only read the sanderson ones twice) i find my self in a reading funk. Nothing seems as bright as Wot. And i have read most of the books recommended here. So here is my two cents worth on the recommendations:
ASoFaI (GoT) AMAZING! but we are probably going to have to wait another 5 years for the next book :(
Farseer trilogy by Hobb - Great but a very depressing book
Sword of truth books - long, and relies to much on the "oh look i just happen to have found what i need just now to solve this problem" plot line
Nights Dawn and Commonweath Saga trilogies - incredible, vast and keeps you (well me, but i might be slow) guessing
Name of the Wind - Such a great fantastic read. But still waiting on the next book Mr Rothfuss if you are reading! Stop playing D&D and FB'ing!
All the books ever written by Alaister Reynolds. With out a doubt the best sci fi writer out there.
Wool, First Shift, Dust by hugh howey. - also great reads.

brightblade
03-09-2013, 13:05
The main issue was wanting to punch every female character right in the face. I don't like books that make me feel misogynistic. I'm afraid I'm done with Jordan.

I think you have missed the point of the female characters. As the series goes on everybody grows and changes. Each character (male and female) has ups and downs and each has a thoroughly satisfying conclusion.

I found the books in no way misogynistic and loved reading them. There were times where I didn't like what happened but having got to the end I can see how it all has a purpose. A series clearly planned out from inception.

However, if you don't like it, don't read it. Wouldn't the world be dull if we were all the same?

Another vote for Mr Rothfuss. Good stuff.

ColShaw
03-09-2013, 13:24
I think you have missed the point of the female characters. As the series goes on everybody grows and changes. Each character (male and female) has ups and downs and each has a thoroughly satisfying conclusion.

I found the books in no way misogynistic and loved reading them. There were times where I didn't like what happened but having got to the end I can see how it all has a purpose. A series clearly planned out from inception.

I think I didn't explain myself adequately. I didn't mean to say the books were misogynistic... I mean to say they made ME want to be, because of the degree to which I hated the female characters, which deeply disturbed me.

And unfortunately, if Jordan wanted me to wait around for his thoroughly satisfying conclusion, he made me wait a little too long. The first ~4000 pages didn't make me care for Nynaeve, Egwene, et al, so if their character arcs were planned out to make me like them in the end, the arcs were not planned accurately for me.

brightblade
05-09-2013, 20:30
@ColShaw, To be honest I didn't get on with Egwene or Nynaeve at the start. They didn't **** me off enough to make me not finish the books though.

I often find myself not liking characters but accept them as part of the ride the author is taking me on. Some don't go anywhere (Goodkind, Williams), some do.

In WoT Aviendha, Elayne and Min more than made up for Egwene's smugness and Nynaeve's self righteousness. Both of them resolve these paths and grow to have a greater part of the story as a result.

Out of interest, who are your fave fantasy characters and authors?

ColShaw
05-09-2013, 21:27
Out of interest, who are your fave fantasy characters and authors?

My favorite authors (not necessarily in this order) are:

-Tolkien
-Pratchett
-Lloyd Alexander
-C.S. Lewis
-Tad Williams

My favorite characters from each of these authors?
-Sam Gamgee and Faramir from Lord of the Rings
-Sam Vimes from Discworld
-Coll from the Prydain Chronicles
-Puddleglum from Narnia
-Duke Isgrimnur from Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn

I suppose I should note that it wasn't just dislike of Egwene and Nynaeve that put me off the books; it was the sheer size of them, coupled with their (significant) pacing problems.

brightblade
06-09-2013, 13:25
@colshaw

Interesting, I think the problems you had with Jordan I had with Williams. Lol. After reading Memory, Sorrow and Thorn I just felt robbed! Ha ha.

Hellebore
12-09-2013, 05:00
And unfortunately, if Jordan wanted me to wait around for his thoroughly satisfying conclusion, he made me wait a little too long. The first ~4000 pages didn't make me care for Nynaeve, Egwene, et al, so if their character arcs were planned out to make me like them in the end, the arcs were not planned accurately for me.

Haha this is EXACTLY why I haven't gotten past the first book in a song of ice and fire. I stopped towards the end of the first book (maybe 50 pages from the end or something) because at that point in time I was following a bunch of ******** or emos around and I really could not give a crap (or summon the reading effort) to keep reading about them. If I want depressing ******* murderer protagonists in a War of the Roses style story.... I'll read War of the Roses.

Everyone around me is aghast that I haven't read the whole series and they keep telling me 'it gets better' and 'it's amazing' etc etc but it's one of the few books I've never actually finished in my life which is saying quite a lot...

Hellebore

Count Zero
14-09-2013, 09:20
I really enjoyed Pricne of Thorns (Broken Empire series) by Mark Lawrence, sequal is great too, just waiting for the price to drop on the final part. Good if you like anti-heroes.

some good suggestions here, as i have been struggling to find something to read, will definately check out Abercombie, amazon have the 1st law trillogy bost set for £6.50 at the moment

Karhedron
03-10-2013, 12:03
Could start on the Culture series by the late Ian Banks. Very good sci-fi novels that explore how a human society of the future that have eliminated all problems would function in a larger setting of space.

I'll second that, the Culture novels are excellent.

How about the Rivers of London series by Ben Aaronovitch? Sort of Niel Gaiman meets CSI with gods, monsters and wizards hiding in present-day London.

williamsond
03-10-2013, 12:08
Have you read the gap series by stephen donaldson, they are really, really, really good, failing that if you want some thing a bit lighter try the david gemmell stuff he writes some of the best "Real" fantasy charaters out there and the litary world was a much bleaker place after he died a few years ago.

AndrewGPaul
03-10-2013, 20:00
You've finished the Wheel of Time? Why, then start again. :)

Alternatively, what about China Miéville? Perdido Street Station, The Scar and The Iron Council are the three books in his Bas-Lag series; urban fantasy with a Dickensian feel and some interesting worldbuilding.

Torga_DW
05-10-2013, 07:08
May i recommend the seafort saga? Relatively short series (only 4 books + 1 'afterwards' book), but its "18th century british navy" style sci-fi. Midshipman's hope is the first one (they all have hope in the name btw). I thought it was great reading.

Alex_H
09-10-2013, 22:31
I have decided to try Joe Abercrombie and brought myself "The Blade Itself". I will let you know how I get on. Thanks for all the suggestions.

Lothlanathorian
16-10-2013, 00:41
I have decided to try Joe Abercrombie and brought myself "The Blade Itself". I will let you know how I get on. Thanks for all the suggestions.

*searches for the 'like' button*realizes he isn't on FB*wonders why he isn't on FB.*

kaulem
16-10-2013, 01:17
there are some good suggestions in this thread, but my last two literary loves I've discovered after aGoT & WoT are:

Patrick Rothfuss' "the name of the wind" (truly a character masterpiece)

&

Brandon Sanderson's "Mistborm" (a really original take on the fantasy genre)

Alex_H
20-10-2013, 22:36
I think I am about 1/3 in to the book and so far I am really liking it. I like the way the characters are building. I have no idea where the story is going, but I like the writing style and the themes running through this.

Lothlanathorian
22-10-2013, 02:18
I think I am about 1/3 in to the book and so far I am really liking it. I like the way the characters are building. I have no idea where the story is going, but I like the writing style and the themes running through this.

I just bought the most recent book (Red Country, 6th book) and it took a whole two days for me to devour. Just couldn't stop reading. Joe Abercrombie's universe and characters are just fantastic.

Perrin
26-10-2013, 14:54
If you fancy a change from fantasy/sci-fi the Conqueror and Emperor series by Conn Iggulden are both really good, historical fiction about Genghis Khan and Julius Caesar respectively.
The Eagle series by Simon Scarrow, again historical fiction, is also good apart from the two main characters are basically Gotrek and Felix in the amount of danger they get in and out of.

All of the myth master books by Rick Riordan are good as well, although they are aimed at a mid-teenage age group I'd say. I'm twenty and still enjoy them, but I did start reading the series when it first started around a decade ago.

The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini is good, fantasy and a really big detailed world with a lot of background.

The Abhorsen Trilogy by Garth Nix is another, fantasy series with walking dead and sorcerers, evil spirits etc.

And of course any Discworld novel by the mighty Terry Pratchett.

dalezzz
26-10-2013, 15:05
The women in wheel of time are pretty much all ********s :p good books though . + 1 for robin hobb all her books have been good , soldiers son books got a bit too depressing I suppose.
+1 for joe Abercrombie too , his stuff is excellent .

No love for Tom Lloyd? I loved his books , can't wait to see what he does next

Odin
27-10-2013, 16:21
I just bought the most recent book (Red Country, 6th book) and it took a whole two days for me to devour. Just couldn't stop reading. Joe Abercrombie's universe and characters are just fantastic.

If he could be as prolific as Pratchett I'd still be wanting more. If anything I think the more recent books are even better than the trilogy, and that's saying something.

Lothlanathorian
31-10-2013, 00:10
All of the myth master books by Rick Riordan are good as well, although they are aimed at a mid-teenage age group I'd say. I'm twenty and still enjoy them, but I did start reading the series when it first started around a decade ago.

I'm almost 30 and started with The Lightning Thief and have been buying every book the day it came out since then. Granted, this is only with Percy Jackson/Heroes of Olympus. I haven't read any of his other ones yet, but, probably will.


If he could be as prolific as Pratchett I'd still be wanting more. If anything I think the more recent books are even better than the trilogy, and that's saying something.

I don't agree totally. I LOVE The First Law trilogy. Everything he's put out is absolutely fantastic, but, I really loved that whole dragging of the typical fantasy adventure party right through the mud it came from. I've read that the next books will be a trilogy to cap it all of and, with the intrigue that's been going on in the background (which stands out so plainly thanks to The First Law trilogy), I can't wait to see what kind of world changing events take place next.

And I'd really like for him to, after this 'end cap' trilogy, write about what Logen got up to after The First Law but before Red Country. Logen Ninefingers is just awesome.

Zink
31-10-2013, 02:04
I'm almost 30 and started with The Lightning Thief and have been buying every book the day it came out since then. Granted, this is only with Percy Jackson/Heroes of Olympus. I haven't read any of his other ones yet, but, probably will.

I'm 39 and started reading Percy Jackson a month ago when my 10 year old son bought the first series as a box set. I liked them enough I'm reading the second series now. The writing in the Lightning Thief wasn't the best but the story was interesting. The later books have improved a lot. Nice light reading. I plan on trying out the Kane chronicles later.

Lothlanathorian
31-10-2013, 04:10
I'm 39 and started reading Percy Jackson a month ago when my 10 year old son bought the first series as a box set. I liked them enough I'm reading the second series now. The writing in the Lightning Thief wasn't the best but the story was interesting. The later books have improved a lot. Nice light reading. I plan on trying out the Kane chronicles later.

Exactly this.

tristessa
04-11-2013, 12:13
Tad Williams' Memory Sorrow and Thorn series. Really really good fantasy. Up there with WoT for me and a lot shorter. Speaking of which, I rather think they are both due a re-read!

And on the subject of WoT, just feel I have to say how sad it is that RJ didn't get to see the finish. Still makes me sad six years on. Sanderson did a pretty good job of wrapping it up I think, though you wonder what might have been. I'd love to know who wrote what in AMOL.

Zink
13-11-2013, 16:48
Just finished reading "The Name of the Wind" because of the reccommendations here. Wow. Seriously wow. I'm starting on "The Wise Man's Fears" and already thinking the wait for the third book is going to be hard. All my favourite recent series are making me wait right now. Detroyermen, Dresden Files, Lost Fleet, King Killer Chronicles and others.

Chainsofsigil
21-11-2013, 21:14
In case it hasn't been mentioned: Michael Moorcock's Eternal Champion legacy of books is not only a good read, but a companion for life if you dig them.

The Elric Saga is simply incredible. You may have to read it many, many times. The Chronicles of Corum is rich in theme and character, but parts of it are a bit rushed. Still well worth it for the good parts though.

If they resonate with you, these books are so good the seep into your character and imbue you with power! I genuinely long for a real-life version of Craig Don *sigh*

182093

p.s. I knew a bloke who threw his Wheel of Time in the bin. Thought it was Trollocs :(

Freak Ona Leash
22-11-2013, 16:50
And I'd really like for him to, after this 'end cap' trilogy, write about what Logen got up to after The First Law but before Red Country. Logen Ninefingers is just awesome.

While I agree with the awesomeness of Joe Abercrombie's work, I think perhaps this last bit should be spoilered. As while it may be pretty obvious for those familiar with the series (or for those who closely examine cover art ;) ), those new to the series might be angry if that particular info gets spoiled.

Jim
04-12-2013, 16:15
I too went through a similar 'funk' as the OP when the final WoT book came out...I'll list what I've been diverting myself with recently:

Fantasy:

Joe Abercrombie as many have already said is AMAZING. The First Law Trilogy is great and the 3 further books set in the same universe (The Heroes, Best Served Cold & Red Country) get better and better - personal fav is The Heroes

Scott Lynch's The Gentleman B#asterds Sequence (The Lies of Locke Lamora, Red Skies Red Seas & The Republic of Thieves) is great reading like a fantasy Ocean's 11

Brandon Sanderson's work away from WoT is good - particular interested to see follow up to The Way of Kings

Terry Pratchett - anything with Vimes & the witches is good

Sci Fi

Alastair Reynolds & Iain M Banks are your go to guys here! Seriously.

Happy Reading!

Jim

Hellebore
05-12-2013, 02:15
Currently reading JV Jones' Baker's Boy. Not bad fare. Some full on imagery but more in the Robin Hobb than Terry Goodkind way...

I wonder if its due to the female authorship?

Hellebore

Odin
05-12-2013, 15:32
Joe Abercrombie as many have already said is AMAZING. The First Law Trilogy is great and the 3 further books set in the same universe (The Heroes, Best Served Cold & Red Country) get better and better - personal fav is The Heroes


So... they get better and better, but your favourite is the first one? ;)

Jim
06-12-2013, 14:50
So... they get better and better, but your favourite is the first one? ;)

I didn't read them in the release order! ;)

Jim

Freak Ona Leash
06-12-2013, 23:48
So... they get better and better, but your favourite is the first one? ;)

...huh? The Heroes is the second-to-last one in the series :p And incidentally, my favorite as well.

Odin
07-12-2013, 00:16
...huh? The Heroes is the second-to-last one in the series :p And incidentally, my favorite as well.

Oh yes, so it is!

My favourite too!

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk

Lothlanathorian
10-12-2013, 15:53
The Heroes was a fantastic read. It's a huge book and takes place in a span of 3 day, if I remember right. Lots of detail and very well written/executed. And I love how the non-trilogy books tie into the larger story of this world.