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hd.40
23-10-2013, 21:07
I've been playing Warhammer now off and on for about 15 years and I'm thinking about trying out my first tourney.

Problem is I'm a "friendly" gamer and I've a little nervous about trying out in the "big leagues." ie: forgetting rules/pissing people off/screwing up etiquette.


Any advise to a new comer?

jeffzcubfan
23-10-2013, 22:04
1) Have fun. Plain and simple.

Depending on the tournament most players are great and friendly. If you run into Mr. Hypercompetitive, don't let it ruin your day. Just use it as a learning experience and mark him down on the sportsmanship side.

Jeff

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Kayosiv
23-10-2013, 22:11
1. Read the rulebook again. No, don't just skim it because you "know that part already." Read the whole thing again. I'm still finding stuff I've been playing wrong for years and I've read through it 3-4 times by now.

2. Speed up your play. I'm an especially slow player, so I had to practice this quite a bit in preparation for tournaments. Make your decisions in advance. Don't think about what to charge on your turn, think about it on THEIR turn. Don't think about what spells you're going to cast, KNOW what spells you need to get off and how many dice each spell should be cast with, all ahead of time. Roll your dice fast. Be ready to roll your dice as soon as your opponent drops theirs. All these things can shave a few minutes off of every phase, which adds up to a significant amount of time over an entire game and can mean the difference between an extra turn.

3. Practice not getting frazzled. Don't worry about the mistake you just made. It isn't important. All that matters is what is left on the board and minimizing your opponent's victory and getting as many points as possible. Don't just worry about getting first place, especially in your 1st tournament, but always focus on getting the best score that you can. You'll need this mindset in order to get first when and if it ever happens in the future and it is best to start now. Living in the past and getting upset about things just ruins future games and in tournaments you usually have a long time to go until it is over after your first mistake.

4. Learn just as much from being defeated as you do when you win. If you're a friendly gamer with not very hard lists, and get demolished. Figure out why. Talk to your opponent about it. Stay positive and I bet they'll be happy to tell you why they won so easily.

underscore
23-10-2013, 22:21
Cheat sheets are also a good idea - if you're guilty of book-flicking all the time have a couple of printouts with your unit's stats and special rules on it. Then maybe one with all the standard misfire/miscast/etc charts.

Don Zeko
23-10-2013, 22:33
1. Read the rulebook again. No, don't just skim it because you "know that part already." Read the whole thing again. I'm still finding stuff I've been playing wrong for years and I've read through it 3-4 times by now.

2. Speed up your play. I'm an especially slow player, so I had to practice this quite a bit in preparation for tournaments. Make your decisions in advance. Don't think about what to charge on your turn, think about it on THEIR turn. Don't think about what spells you're going to cast, KNOW what spells you need to get off and how many dice each spell should be cast with, all ahead of time. Roll your dice fast. Be ready to roll your dice as soon as your opponent drops theirs. All these things can shave a few minutes off of every phase, which adds up to a significant amount of time over an entire game and can mean the difference between an extra turn.

3. Practice not getting frazzled. Don't worry about the mistake you just made. It isn't important. All that matters is what is left on the board and minimizing your opponent's victory and getting as many points as possible. Don't just worry about getting first place, especially in your 1st tournament, but always focus on getting the best score that you can. You'll need this mindset in order to get first when and if it ever happens in the future and it is best to start now. Living in the past and getting upset about things just ruins future games and in tournaments you usually have a long time to go until it is over after your first mistake.

4. Learn just as much from being defeated as you do when you win. If you're a friendly gamer with not very hard lists, and get demolished. Figure out why. Talk to your opponent about it. Stay positive and I bet they'll be happy to tell you why they won so easily.

This is all really great advice. In particular, think about why you lost when you lose and what you could have done differently. That's how you win next time.

Kain187
23-10-2013, 22:45
I suggest just being open with the guys your playing. Let them know this is your first tourney and for them to let you know if you do anything out of the ordinary. Be very clear not only in your movement but your intentions. "I am moving this unit to make sure I am outside of your line of sight. Do you agree?" 90% of the players out there in my experience are a ton of fun and love seeing new people join the tournament scene. Another general hobby tip is dont bring the rip your throat out lists. Bring a softer friendlier list. Doesnt need to be a push over list but you will definately meet more people for future games if both players have fun playing eachother. Above all else have fun.

Phazael
23-10-2013, 23:42
First time out, treat it like a long garage hammer day. Play, have gun, learn, and socialize. There will be dbags, but its easy to ignore them if you keep a good attitude. Play something you know that is fun, then tune it up or down the next time you hit an event accordingly. Never go in expecting to win (even people who win often don't), but go in expecting to get some good games and to make some new friends.

Gaming wise, practice playing at a brisk pace and never be afraid of asking a question about the rules. Be as transparent as you can at all times and be as fair to your opponent as you can. Remember, there is no game of warhammer worth arguing over, but don't let obvious cheaters off the hook either. And the most important thing is to play what you are familiar with, even if its not the best thing out there, because as they say "no plan survives contact with the enemy" and having things you know well in your army will serve you in those situations.

MOMUS
23-10-2013, 23:47
I would actually say bring your hardest list, it's good if you are a newer player in an area to shake things up a bit and it's doubtful you are going to smash the established regulars.

I would echo the comments about time of your games, you wanna be using 12 mins a turn. Get plenty of practice trimming yourself in games. Not only think ahead, but go back to your list and re think how it works for you.
A couple of friends of mine condensed their lists making them smaller so they could play faster and thus get in all 6 turns every game.

Have fun :)

boli
24-10-2013, 10:50
"I am moving this unit to make sure I am outside of your line of sight. Do you agree?" .

This is a good rule in any game - having oversized templates to showcase the 90* forward arc solves a lot of bickering over "you're just bending the tape measure to get a flank charge" arguments.

Oh and decide the charge distance (and confirm with them) BEFORE you roll the dice; trust me it solves a lot of problems.

Evil Hypnotist
25-10-2013, 07:04
@ The OP.

I played in my first tournament earlier in the year, I know exactly what you mean about the transition you are worried about, there is definitely a step up in terms of playing sytle and tactics. I played 6 games over two days and got 'tabled' by quite a gamey opponent in my first game (worst nightmare), but after that I had a whale of a time. Every other player I faced was a really good sport and many of them will be going to my second tourny in December, I am looking forward to seeing and playing against them again. I also learnt a huge amount.

In terms of advice I think Kayosiv absolutely nailed it on the head, especially point 1. Not many people have a complete knowledge of the rules but knowing what you are doing and being confident on rules queries really speeds up play. There are also an number of rules, just like Kayosiv said, that I had been playing incorrectly for years (I mean really, embarrassingly, basic rules!) so do brush up on them and the FAQs. Also, on the run up to my first tourny I sought out as many different armies as I could to test my list for it's flexibility and timed the games I was having. When I started I was only getting to turn 4 in 3 hours, at the tournament I was finished and having a cup of tea after 2.5hrs in some games.

Good luck, I'm sure you will have a blast!

SkawtheFalconer
25-10-2013, 09:39
I think the big thing for me in tourneys (and I've played in many) is to not assume that you are wrong, because someone who is clearly a vet tells you that you are. There is nothing wrong with politely asking them to show you the relevant part of the rule book. With that said, you don't want to do that a lot for purely time reasons, so as other posters have said read up on the BRB.

Don't give up information about your army list until you have to.

As with any gathering of strangers, you are likely to bump into people you won't get on with. Just accept it for what it is, and if you find yourself against a non-fun opponent, just do your best to enjoy your side of it, ignore their antics, and look forward to your next game! In a 6 game tournament, I've never had more than two duff opponents over the weekend - usually it's just one or even none.

Have a good time. :)

Sir Didymus
27-10-2013, 07:43
And first of all; don't take it too seriously, and don't be an **** :)

There are plenty of people, who go to tournaments with no hopes of winning - which doesn't equate not playing to win - but just to meet new people and see new armies across the table.

Knowing the rules by heart is a good thing - if you want to end up in a raised voice rules argument, since you will invariably meet opponents, who got it wrong - if not actually cheating. Although having no knowledge doesn't have to be a problem - I learned 40K by going to tournaments, and didn't end up last, but I did have a decent grasp of tactics and the role of my units, so I didn't have to take ages making decisions, just translating those decisions into the rules framework, and most gamers are actually nice guys.

Bring your own stuff - gamers can get very possessive about books, templates and dice in particular, and the hobby does have a tendency to attract the needlessly obsessive types - who can be quite fun individuals despite these quirks - so just remember your own.

Think ahead - tournaments are on a tight time schedual, and since you aren't actively doing stuff half the time (in your opponents turn), you can start planning your own moves there, so you won't have to waste time shuffling toy soldiers around, when your opponents has nothing to do but wait.

Don't be an ****, but don't get surprised if your opponent is a **** - if someone forgot to move or shoot some little unit somewhere, let them do so. You'll not only get a better challenge, but also a better mood to the game - and its not like you could have done anything to counter it anyway. Its a game meant to envoke a fatasy battle, not a boardgame about shuffling plastic toy soldiers around. But don't get surprised if your opponent denies you the same courtesy - but you can handle this in advance by just having a little chat about what 'fair play' is before placing troops.

Gorbad Ironclaw
27-10-2013, 07:50
I'd also add don't be too intimidated. Yes, there are some very good tournament players out there, but the majority of people are going to be just like your average guy down the club/store/whatever because that's essentially what they are.

Bring something youk ow how to play so you know how your own stuff works and then be nice and friendly. 99% of all people I've meet at tournaments are nice and are just there for a day of playing with toy soldiers and having fun with mates. So enjoy yourself.

Baluc
27-10-2013, 15:30
Likely you will lose one round big against a player who is there to win the event (which is not to say that the person will be a huge dick, but that the game may be very one sided). After that you will play against players more at your skill level or your intention.

Things to remember;

Just because they are tournament players doesn't mean they know all the rules. Read the book and be confident when you know you are right.

Try to resolve disputes before dice are rolled and there isn't a clear advantage to be had either way. (Charge distances, line of sight)

Describe your intent when moving. Saying something like I'm trying to get out of line of sight of your monster. Most players will work with you to do this. And since you have both worked together even if it isn't quite right I tend to give it too the player if they had the movement to do it.

Roll your dice beside the unit being effected by it. Combat dice near the combat, shots near the enemy, scatter dice near the target.

Scammel
27-10-2013, 16:02
Go to the event with no expectations whatsoever, try to have a good time, then adjust thereafter appropriately. Don't fall into the trap of assuming certain things about the nature of tourney-goers.

leopard
27-10-2013, 20:39
Take some headache tablets with you, take a drink as well and keep them with you - if you're like me you won't be as used to spending a day concentrating and thinking as the average event will require - its not hard but just be ready for it.

Take a note book, after each game jot down anything you want to look up later or just anything you think is worth remembering or that seemed 'odd'.

+lots to declaring what you are doing as you do it, especially with movement, avoids a lot of issues - also helps if you're trying to be out of arc/in arc of something for it to be obvious - i.e. not a hairs width but half an inch or more.

If you're concerned you play slowly take this into account when you pick your list, ditto think how long it will take to pack and unpack, not got round to it myself yet but apparently a second set of movement trays can work wonders - as models are killed put them on the other tray to help set up for the next game, also keeps things tidy. Practice setting your army up on a table somewhere, doesn't need to be a gaming table to be aware how long it will take to deploy, how big various units actually are. practice moving it about etc.