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Gor (dopanium opa) rok
17-12-2013, 21:22
1. The rule- and armybook (of your army) are needed if you are building an army, as annoying it sounds (and expensive) you can still ask alot from warseer pros.
2. you can make movement trays free from the box where your figs came + from blue tack.
3. Asking about things on the forum really helps you get started.
4. Warhammer is a hobby that can be playing or just painting some figures for fun, remember there's an gallery too in warseer where you can look at well painted models and learn.
5. Watching battle reports and how-to tutorials is helpful, doesn't matter do you like playing or painting more, they still help both. Bluetablepainting is an awesome channel on youtube either are you looking for painting or tactics.

SimaoSegunda
17-12-2013, 21:42
A supplementary point to no.5. The battle reports of Oncebitten360 have been hugely useful to me in making the transition from newcomer/whipping boy, to regular winner of games.

Tyrant of Zhufbar
18-12-2013, 05:50
Not just OnceBitten360 but the whole youtube community he is associated with put out great quality stuff. I tell all the noobs to watch batreps, I find bluetable to be great for modelling/painting and poor on applicable tactics (plus his steadicam makes me motion sick)

bigbiggles
18-12-2013, 10:25
Blue table has amazing models/boards and are fun to watch. But they are off on the fantasy rules many times.

Oncebitten and mrmalorian are good for warhammer rules batreps

Kingly
18-12-2013, 12:23
6. Don't be too concerned with what people say doesn't work, as most of the time the fractions between what doesn't work on the 'Netz' and what does work in real games are minimal. i.e. Posters saying White Lions > Sword Masters, then my unit of SM wipe out a DeathStar of Trolls, don't read into it too much N00bz.
7. Learn how to use fast cavalry/Vanguard/Scouts as even though they may look rubbish on paper and expensive as hell (See Shadow Warriors) they're a really great tool! Remember in CC warmachines don't use the Toughness of the machine, they use the juicy crew.

Blinder
18-12-2013, 18:23
8. Don't try to jump into a "full" 2500 (or whatever) point army right away just because that's what you usually see people playing. Check with your local group about setting up some smaller games, especially if there are other new players (or just people looking to start new armies). Doesn't hurt the wallet as much up-front, can make it easier to get accustomed to the rules (not just knowing them, but understanding what they mean during play), and doesn't present you with quite such a mountain of figures to paint (for some people it isn't an issue, but for many having a lot outstanding can kill the fun of the hobby side).

It's easy to buy more stuff whenever you feel comfortable with what you have and confident of what you want next... it isn't so easy deal with having bought too much (sure, you can just set stuff aside for a while, but then it's there, waiting, watching...). Even if you have no interest in painting and no pressure to do so (or aren't even using actual models!?!) starting smaller can work out better from a really-learn-the-rules perspective.

boli
18-12-2013, 20:16
Don't fart when you game, around the table there is no escape!

Oh, you meant serious tips? ;)

9. When you build an army ask yourself "how am I going to use this unit" for each unit and "How does this unit fit in with my overall battle plan?".

Examine each of your units for their weaknesses and strengths. You are planning to bring several monsters? Great! How are they going to defeat steadfast? Bring a lot of BS S3 shooting, what if they get close? He bring 1+ Save knights... What can I counteract them with?

You might not be able to answer all of his possible options (and if you bring nothing but a reactionary list your own build and plan will suffer) but knowing each units strengths and weaknesses and how you plan to use them on the table is the best tactics you can get before you even bring your forces to the table.

A good thing to do if you are shirt of funds is spend a good while building up many MANY lists and whittle them down using the above method. You should end up with a core 2 or 3 lists of the army you want to build and you can start to plan your purchases and painting accordingly.

Arny building is 30% Maths, 20% Inspiration, 20% research on the internet, 10% cool models and 40% getting the maths wrong so you'll have to bring an odd number of models in a unit ;)

Lordcypress
18-12-2013, 20:48
Ah, is there even a newb reading this post or is this just vetran players giving one liners one after another? :p.

SSquirrel
18-12-2013, 20:54
I'm newb :)

Yersinia Pestis
19-12-2013, 00:16
i'm a newbee too. but i have to say i've been a painter for a some time.... so i have some 5K WoC, about 4K fieldable and i've started with battles of 2000-2500 points....
this was hard in the beginning.... i expect of my opponent to do his worst.... and i tell him to too!
But i've learnt a lot already in a short period of time! Ok, a lot of players won't like this approach but it worked for me! (and still does...)

Lordcypress
19-12-2013, 00:34
@Yersinia Pestis,

You know what, your approach isn't all that bad. My son started warhammer about 5 years ago. I remember him jumping right into games of 2000-2500pts. Learned the game through playing. To this day he hasn't read a single warhammer rule book outside of the army books. He even won a major tournament. The game is complicated in some areas but simple in others. In the end of the day a good army list can pull a player along. I've been playing warhammer for 13 years now. I've been to lots of tournaments. Seen vetran players lose to newbs, seen vetran players crush newbs. From what I've seen it normally comes down to the list preparation and how you intend to use it.

Just remember; "You can read all day long on how to shoot a bow and arrow but until you do it, you don't know you $h@T".

Dirty Mac
19-12-2013, 12:25
Don't be scared to try every unit, try to have an idea of what you want the army to be or do, and then build a list around that.

Gor (dopanium opa) rok
19-12-2013, 14:41
Wow, sucg an awesome community this of ours, Im loving it how these pros are helping others who are starting warhammer fantasy and 40k Im so glad I made this post, keep being awesome warseer's!

Kahadras
19-12-2013, 15:06
My tips for newbies would be...

1. Before buying anything do some research on what army you want to play. Talk over what you are looking for and what ideas you have in your gaming club or on forums like this one.
2. Read the rules. Read your army book. You don't have to learn everything off by heart but try to get a good grasp of the basics before you play your first game.
3. Before buying any models create an army list and talk to people you trust about it (I'd speak to people in you local gaming club rather than go online for this)
4. Understand that the whole thing is going to be a learning process and there's going to be a lot of defeats along the way.
5. Try to focus on the good and bad points of each game. Look to improve something after every game so that you go into the next game better prepared.

Romark
19-12-2013, 15:33
The only thing I've found is to build an army you like. I've had a tough time deciding on a 40k army, purely because i didnt want to be Dark Eldar because they are too weak, Dark Angels (and all SM's) are too low model count, not many others really interested me until Orks! Now, i'll probably lose more battle's with Orks and i did with my Dark Angels, but i prefer the army so it's OK.

If you can walk away with an army you are invested in, and like it (aesthetically, play wise and fluff) your much more likely to enjoy the whole hobby.

Then again, you may enjoy powergaming/WAAC-yness. I'm more of a fluff guy though.

thesoundofmusica
19-12-2013, 17:02
If you're just starting out or joining a really small group of gamers, try get a feel for what kind of environment you're all looking for. Nobody likes having their fluffy/models-I-like army smashed repeatedly by the WoC flying circus for instance. You could find yourself without opponents real fast or having to swap half your army out to fit in. You shouldnt have to in a perfect world but this is reality for many of us. This can easily be avoided with some communication.

fishound7
20-12-2013, 20:23
Painted models play better. Its a fact.

SpanielBear
21-12-2013, 06:13
But only after their first game as painted models. For it is also true that a newly painted model will do poorly. The equation is something like (time before model's death)=(number of failed dice rolls)\(time spent painting).

Other points of interest-

- if one uses the phrase, "all I have to do is...", one will fail to do that.
- if you are ever certain of an outcome, that's just Murphy and Sod prepping you for an ambush.
- never go up against a Sicilian if death is on the line.
-don't mention fight club.
- the first model carries the weapon. The second model, carries the ammunition. When the first model dies, the, second model picks up the weapon.
- there is no rule six.
- an army is never finished. You will always add more.

ashc
21-12-2013, 08:11
My tips for newbies would be...

1. Before buying anything do some research on what army you want to play. Talk over what you are looking for and what ideas you have in your gaming club or on forums like this one.
2. Read the rules. Read your army book. You don't have to learn everything off by heart but try to get a good grasp of the basics before you play your first game.
3. Before buying any models create an army list and talk to people you trust about it (I'd speak to people in you local gaming club rather than go online for this)
4. Understand that the whole thing is going to be a learning process and there's going to be a lot of defeats along the way.
5. Try to focus on the good and bad points of each game. Look to improve something after every game so that you go into the next game better prepared.

This combined with Romark's comment are very good. Definitely choose your first army based on the models you like the most, and then start doing some research!

Light of the Emperor
23-12-2013, 17:36
Choose your army and units based on your own desires rather than your typical internet lists. What units fit the background you are trying to recreate? Do some units just look really cool to you? Are there any that just scream to be painted and put into the field?

I've found that I get much more enjoyment out of my armies and games when I build the list I want versus the competitive net lists. Not saying those are bad and not worth looking at, but don't get discouraged when a unit you really like gets negative responses in tacticas and such.

Finally, the ultimate tip: Just have fun :)

ewar
23-12-2013, 23:07
My tip would be to try out a wide range of units from your book, you'll learn just as much from how the bad ones fail as you will from how the good ones smash face. I've been playing my latest army, Tomb Kings, for two years and feel like I've barely scratched the surface of understanding how to get the most out of them (admittedly I only play about 20 games per year with them). But I try out a different army list as often as possible and a completely different style to see how things fall out in game. Some stuff I've theory hammered has been terrible and other stuff I chucked in on a whim has shone... it's the best way to learn instead of copying internet lists (though these can also be a valuable source of advice).

Ramius4
24-12-2013, 01:04
As a 20 year vet (started in 93), I'd say the best advice I can give is to realize one thing.

It's just a game. Winning is just the objective. But having fun is the point of playing. Don't confuse the two.

In other words, when things don't go your way don't get mad and throw a fit. Take a deep breath and maybe have a laugh about it. Sometimes that's just how things go, and no matter how hard you try, it's your day to lose. Hard.

On the other side of things, always be a gracious winner. If you can see that your opponent is getting crushed and not having fun, don't rub it in if you know it's someone who can't handle it. Next time, it could be you.

Tato
24-12-2013, 12:55
Winning is just the objective. But having fun is the point of playing.
I, my dear Sir, am going to put this quote in bold in my signature now. This is THE most important thing one has to remember playing any game, not only Warhammer. The amount of people getting ******** and mad over losing a game is waaay to high.

Ramius4
26-12-2013, 16:36
I, my dear Sir, am going to put this quote in bold in my signature now. This is THE most important thing one has to remember playing any game, not only Warhammer. The amount of people getting ******** and mad over losing a game is waaay to high.

Even one person is way too high.