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Shadoer
22-12-2013, 13:45
I've noticed that we've been getting a lot of threads and questions from people just starting Warhammer but there doesn't seem to be any consolidated thread dedicated to giving advice to them. So I figured Christmas is as good as any time to make one :)

In this thread we shall cover basic strategy's and tactics for new players, including:

- Common Terms and Strategies Used
- Fundemantals of Army List Design
- Army Deployment and Movement
- Tips and Ideas Useful for New Players

Any advice for new players is welcome as well as any questions from people just starting out the game.

Edit:

Also might as well start by collecting links to other Tactical Threads that would be good for a new player to read:

Wizard Bunkers: http://www.warseer.com/forums/showthread.php?387726-Bunker

Overbitten360 has done an excellent series of YouTube Videos on various tactics in the game: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0E0A35BC790171CB

Shadoer
22-12-2013, 14:17
To kick things off, let's go over some common terms and strategies referred to on Warseer and other websites.

Common Terms Used

Skaven Slaves (Slvs or SS): Games Workshop sometimes doesn’t like it when you post the exact point cost of a unit or an item, so many players have taken to expressing points of magic items and army units in Skaven Slaves instead. I won't say the cost of a Skaven Slave here, but it's a pretty easy google search to find out.

ASF Short for Always Strike First

Bunker: A block of infantry whose main job is to protect a character, usually a Wizard, by providing a “Look Out Sir Roll” and by preventing small fast units like Cavalry from easily charging them and running them down. Usually consists of cheap infantry.

Bus: A tactic where a block of Monsterious Infantry or Heavy Cavalry are ranked up and are led by one or more powerful heroes. Usually they are made especially narrow so units fighting the bus are forced to target some or most of their attacks to a very powerful hero as opposed to the unit itself.

Can Opener: A unit or hero whose main purpose is to deal with heavily armored units such as Knights. Usually uses a high strength attack or an attack that ignores armor.

Charge Redirectors: Very cheap units that you force your opponent to charge in order to get their units into a disadvantageous position. This usually exploits the rule that a charger must line up with the way the charged unit is facing and that charges move at a random distance. Think of it as using a pawn to draw out an enemy Rook into a trap.

Cheese: A tactic considered to be over powered or unfair.

Cowboy: Heavily Armored Heros on a mount and the Crown of Command which charge solo into an enemy unit with the express purpose of holding the unit off and slowly eating it. Because the Crown of Command makes it Stubborn and usually has a good weapon, it can tie up a unit for several rounds of combat while dealing considerable damage. Usually used by the Lizardmen, but also utilized by other armies.

Death Star:A unit where a large quantity of points (usually 30% to 60% of the Army’s total) is spent to create an almost unstoppable unit. Likely is composed of a unit that combines high strength attacks with Magic Items and Characters who protect it from magic and other hazzards. Death Stars that have gained a certain amount of notoriety usually are referred to by the unit mainly used combined with star. Like the Ogre Gutstar.

Fluff: Stories and lore related to the World of Warhammer. Ideas like a chaos god favors a certain number or that two characters tend to hate each other. These are ideas to theme an army around, but aren't always represented in the rules.

Fluff Bunny:A player dedicated to the fluff to the point they base their Army Lists and design around it. This can range from a desire to make an Empire Reikland Army consisting of Reiksguard and other units common to that area too trying to build your Chaos Daemon Army around multiples of Khorne's sacred number at the expense of strategy as well as sanity.

Gamey: A term that imples someone is willing to win by manipulating the rules rather than actually playing the game.

Gun Line: An army list design where a large portion of the army is dedicated to firing ranged attacks at its opponents. Usually incorporates other units to delay the opposing army from reaching the gunline in order to get in as many turns of shooting as possible.

Hammer: A unit designed to deliver lots of high strength attacks at an enemy.

Hero Hammer: When high point costing Character are used to do the majority of fighting in an army.

Math Hammer: Can refer to calculating the probability of a unit achieving a certain goal like the probability of a unit of Chaos Warriors defeating a unit of Orc Boys. It can also refer to a style of army design where you base all of your unit choices on getting the best "mathematical results" possible.

MSU: Or "Many Small Units". It's a style of play where you utilize several small, but efficient units to destroy an enemy army. This usually involves a number of feints, sacrifices, and combined flank & rear charges.

Net List: A popular army list found on the internet. Usually offers the seductive lure of an easy victory at the price of your soul :)

OP: Short for Over Powered. Used to express a tactic, magic item, or unit in the game that is too powerful in relation to it's point cost.

RAW: Sort for Read As Written. Refers to interpreting the rules as exactly as written while ignoring any implied intent. For example, before Games Workshop clarified things in a FAQ most people assumed that the "Warpflame Rule" implied any attack that had this rule also had "flaming attacks" even though it was not stated in the rules. Later GW made it clear that Warpflame, despite having the name flame in the name, was not a "flaming attack."

Tarpit: A unit which sole purpose is to hold off a much more powerful and expensive unit. Usually consists of ranked steadfast cheap infantry, but also are made from other stubborn and unbreakable units.

King Arthur
22-12-2013, 14:43
Large units are the norm in 8th so don't be led off as a player of many new players the box sizes may be small and dependent on which army or unit but average unit sizes are quite large like 25-30 models strong a prime example of this is high elf and dark elf spear men which need the ranks, for combat res and to negate enemy steadfast or keep their own steadfast, and enough ranks to utilize their spears. This means that all units cannot just punch through your units as they aren't big enough, and most armies need a solid centre to their force so their hammers can pummel the enemy, hold their own, or defeat units of larger sizes.

Gillette
22-12-2013, 15:26
Thanks for the clarification... a lot of those have caused some headscratching on my end.

pinktaco
22-12-2013, 16:26
Hmm.. As a Lizardmen player I sort of have to disagree on the cowboy part. The CoC is not needed.

A cowboy for us is either a scar vet (hero) or an oldblood (lord) which works as our Swiss army knife. What I mean is that you can build him for whatever you feel like. An oldblood can be give armour of destiny, dawnstone and a great weapon + he still have points left. He now have a rerollable AS1+ and Wars save of 4+ along with 5 S7 attacks. This guy can take down a lot.

You can also fit him with piranha blades (AP and Multiple Wounds D3) and Stegadon Helmet (T6, impact hit D3) for MI/MC carnage.

He can be fitted with steg helmet, dawnstone and crown of command for and will singled-handedly take down most infantry blocks.

With cold-blood and Ld8 he'll also have a high chance of staying put.

All of those build will have him feature S7 and AS+1, which is why our cowboys are so great. So while you weren't completely off crown of command is not needed, it's the fact that he can do everything you want and do it well.

moonlapse
22-12-2013, 18:39
I think 'cowboy' is used for stubborn mounted characters though (I've only ever seen it used in reference to Crown of Command 1+AS Scar Vets, actually). Extending the term to mean any fighty or tanky character somewhat dilutes its meaning in my opinion.

Drumknott
22-12-2013, 20:33
Lizardmen temple guard have shields and halberds: in close combat do they get to use the shields? (as halberds in the BRB require two hands)

moonlapse
22-12-2013, 20:38
Lizardmen temple guard have shields and halberds: in close combat do they get to use the shields? (as halberds in the BRB require two hands)

No they can only use the shields against ranged attacks. Such questions really belong in the rules forum rather than tactics though!

Soundwave
23-12-2013, 02:28
This is a great idea,there is heaps to cover for general strategies.What would be the best way to keep things orderley?Or do we just post stuff where ever and answer questions as they pop up?

Shadoer
23-12-2013, 03:11
This is a great idea,there is heaps to cover for general strategies.What would be the best way to keep things orderley?Or do we just post stuff where ever and answer questions as they pop up?

I think lets start with Army List Design and just answer questions as they pop up.

Soundwave
23-12-2013, 11:39
Ok.So army list design.
Well being a four phased game turn i guess it safe to say for a newbie i would go for a balanced list.A balanced list takes the basis of an army and uses components to be active in all phases,this will provide a variety of models and options to paint and game with.Some army books are devoid of options as they are geared toward a specific phase e.g.Warriors of Chaos do not have a great deal in the shooting phase and are geared more toward the combat phase.(more on gearing/focus at some point.).
A balanced list is generally made up of a couple of combat blocks,cavalry fast or heavy or both,some small ballista fire in the form of bow/pistol troops,a couple of war machines,monster or two and or some monsterous cavalry and or infantry as well as some small unit chaff and skirmish/scouting troops.
A balanced list will also be lead by a balance of characters usually in the form of a combat lord/hero a casting lord/hero and typically a bsb.
Well this is my take on a "balanced list" please feel free to add debate comment or ask.

Shadoer
09-01-2014, 01:39
Basic Army Design

Hello, welcome to Army Design 101. Here we'll talk about about how to put together an army for casual play.

First, and most importantly, the way you design your army list will determine what kind of game of Warhammer your going to have with it. Each army list should have a built in strategic idea of how it's going to win. Common strategic themes are:

Balanced Army

Favored Forces: The Empire, Warriors of Chaos, Tomb Kings, Dark Elves, High Elves, Daemons of Chaos

Description: The balanced army is what Soundwave talked about, an army which takes a little bit of everything and puts it together. This means taking a combination of artillery, shooting, blocks of infantry, and a monster or two and getting them to work together. This is probably the best way for beginners to learn how to play the game and get a good handle about how every unit in the game works. In terms of gameplay, you should always have a unit on hand that's capable of dealing with any situation you come across. On the downside, you may find yourself struggling against other gameplay styles and you'll rarely have a starting advantage in any given match up.

Gun Line

Favored Forces: The Empire, Dwarves, Skaven, Tomb Kings, Chaos Dwarves

Description: Where a large portion of your army is composed of a large amount of shooting units and you attempt to defeat your enemy before they even reach you. While this style of play seems easy, it's really hard to master. Since your army relies so much on artillery, you need to be able to intercept all the fast units (fast cavalry, flyers, and scouts) that are going to try and take it out. This requires you to build in several of your own fast units or reserve certain of your shooting units in order to "intercept" enemy fast units before they get to your precious artillery. You also need some way to delay part of the enemy army from reaching your gunline, or else their warriors and monsters will cut you down to size if you haven't shot them up enough. This means that a good gunline play will require a lot of strategic though and a portion of fast moving gameplay while a poorly designed one will just require you to stand and shoot each one of your turns while the enemy advances.

Monster Mash

Favored Forces: Dark Elves, Lizardmen, Beastmen, Vampire Counts, Tomb Kings, The Empire, Warriors of Chaos

Description: Sometimes players bring godzilla like armies onto the field in order to crush their enemies. Monster mash armies are characterized by having several Toughness 5+ monsters striding the battlefield, likely being healed by a caster or some other means (Lore of Life is popular in these lists). They also will be escorted by several fast units (fast cavalry, flyers, and scouts) in order to take out pesky enemy artillery which can make short work of them.

Cavalry Armies

Favored Forces: Brettonia, High Elves, The Empire, Warriors of Chaos, Ogre Kingdoms (In the sense that ogres with their mov of 6 end up playing a lot like cavalry armies)

Description: An army that relies on maneuvering and heavily armored units in order to achieve victory. This sort of playstyle involves focusing a large portion of your army on a small portion of your opponents and attempting to take them out piece meal. The antithesis of this army is artillery, steadfast infantry blocks, and monsters requiring a person commanding this sort of force to carefully plan each and every one of his charges.

There are other forms of design as well, but they are more exotic and shouldn't be attempted by a new player unless he enjoys a steep learning curve. Like Wood Elves are built around the idea of guerrilla warfare and is a rewarding army to play, but is very very difficult to play properly. Another good example is Orcs and Goblins which, while very fun, animosity makes every turn of Orcs and Goblins a mini game of crisis management.

Next when making an army list, you want to make sure you have all the tools you need to defeat your opponents. This means making sure you have something to deal with

- Toughness 5+ Monsters with Armor and/or Regeneration (Skaven Hellpit Abominations, Empire Steam Tanks, Chaos Chimeras)
- Massive blocks of cheap infantry which are stubborn thanks to steadfast. (Skaven Slaves, Empire State Trooper Hordes, Goblins)
- Heavily armored units with a 3+ or better (Chaos Warriors, Bretonian Knights, High Elf Silver Helms)
- Massed artillery to pound you into oblivion (Skaven Warp Lightning Cannons, Empire Gun Line, Dwarf Castles)
- Lightly armored specialist infantry that slaughter you in close combat (Almost all Dark Elf and High Elf specialist infantry)
- Super powerful heroes that can make up almost 25% of the army's point allowance (Vampires, Chaos Daemon Princes, Lizardmen Saurus Cowboys)

Keep these threats in the back of your mind whenever making an army list, and try and bring in units and strategies to defeat each one. A good army list should have an answer to each and every one of these threats.

If you want something specific to try and "test" your army or units against, test against the following units

- A Chaos Chimera
- A unit of 20 Chaos Warriors with Halberds and the Mark of Nurgle
- A Chaos Daemon Prince of Nurgle.

These aren't the most powerful units of their kind, but since Warriors of Chaos is as popular as they are, these units are a sort of "gold standard" in threats you should plan to face off against.

Finally, post your army list along with your notes on why you choose the units you did and what kind of plan you have in mind for your army and get some feedback. It's always a good idea to get a second set of eyes to look over your army list and see if other people might notice some mistake you've made or have an idea of how you could improve your list.

Shadoer
09-01-2014, 07:38
What Army to Start With?

You might be wondering "Gosh this game looks really cool, but I don't know what army to start with?!". As of the start of 2014, there are 14 different armies in Warhammer Fantasy and 15 if we count the Chaos Dwarves. Considering the costs and time it takes to get one army to 2000pts, your first army is a tough decision.

Personally I'd suggest if you are going to play any army, go with the one that captures your imagination the best. All the armies are good in their own way and have a wide range of beautiful models. However, if you are new to the game, you really don't know what army to play and I'd suggest you start off with the Warriors of Chaos.

The Warriors of Chaos are currently the best army to start off with if you are going into fantasy. In purely strategic terms, the Chaos Warriors are a forgiving army where you have a number of excellent unit choices and doesn't suffer from the same liabilities other army's do. For example, if you want to run artillery by fielding Hellcannons, you don't have to worry nearly as much as other armies do in guarding your hell cannon from fast units because, welp, your cannon can eat most of the fast units in the game. Also it helps that your basic trooper, the Chaos Warrior, is a good match against most of the other units in the game.

Another point about the Warriors of Chaos is that they are one of the cheapest Fantasy armies to collect. Because of their high point cost and lower prices on the GW store, you can put a 2500pt Chaos Army together for about $350 at the full Games Workshop Price. If you go the ebay or online seller route, that number drops dramatically.

Also Chaos Warriors are a bit easier to paint than other armies. You have to deal with a lot less faces and much more with armored helmets. Also, thanks to the low model count, it will take less time to paint up a Chaos Army than any other one.

Finally, since Chaos Warriors are a pretty popular army, if you decide you don't like them, you can sell them on ebay with relative ease.

If you don't feel like selling your soul to the dark powers, the High Elves and the Empire are your next best bet.

Both the High Elves and the Empire have almost full access to the full range of unit types available in the game. A variety of armies can be made with them and they can cater to a wide variety of play styles. Also they are both fairly forgiving armies, even though the High Elves lack numbers (they make it up in ward saves)

It's also worth noting that the High Elves are currently part of the Island of Blood set, making the a bit cheaper to collect if you are willing to trade the set with someone, do some converting, and go on ebay adventures.

After those three armies, the other 12 armies start catering to more specific game play styles and have some progressively larger glaring weaknesses. Orcs have a massive army selection but are hampered by their animosity rolls, Dark Elves have paper thin armor and several troop choices that suffer from stupidity and frenzy checks, Ogres's low initiative is a major liability for them, and so on. Now these army's are fun to play and are rewarding, but their learning curves are significantly steeper than other forces and you have to manage their weaknesses while maximizing their strengths.

It's worth noting again that Wood Elves and Beastmen probably shouldn't be taken as your first army and have a very high learning curve. They are rewarding and fun to play, but their play styles are tough to master.

The Wood Elves are effectively a vietcong-esq guerrilla fighting force that strikes from the forests while the Beastmen are an ambushing force which has to manage troops attacking from various vectors as well as managing the number of psychology tests you need to live through to make the army effective. Both armies require a lot of patience and practice to get really good at it.

Shadoer
09-01-2014, 18:01
Intermediate Army Design

Alright, now that we've gone over the general basics of good army list design it's time to go over some specific tricks involved in army design.



Choosing A Lore of Magic

When choosing what lore of magic to use in your army, you usually want to take something which will complement your army. For example, if you are light on artillery both the Lore of Shadow and the Lore of Death contain spells that will autokill a creature with a low initiative (almost all monsters have a very low initiative) making these lores an attractive option for monster killing. Alternatively if you are bringing a lot of artillery to the game, you might be more concerned with armored infantry and knights. Then Metal would become your lore of choice.

On the flip side, if you are running a Monster heavy list, taking either the Lore of Death or the Lore of Metal might not be your best option. Neither lore really helps your monsters or eliminates threats that they can't. However, the Lore of Life's passive ability can feed back your Monster's wounds and alternatively, the Lore of Light can give some protection against artillery as well as temporarily up your Monster's initiative.

Here's a quick run down of the strengths and uses of each lore in the main rulebook.

Metal - Take this lore if you don't have a lot of attacks that are Str5 or higher to fight heavily armored foes. Also known for the "Final Transmutation" which has a 1/3 chance of killing any model in the game.

Life - Good if your army is fielding several monster or you are a small elite force that can't take many casualties and need to preserve your soldiers. Also known for "Dwellers", a spell which forces an entire unit to take a strength test for each model and instantly kills them without any ward save. Since the average strength of a unit is Str3 and most heros don't have a Strength higher than 4, Dwellers has become one of the main "assassination spells".

Light - Use this lore if you find yourself bogged down by the "unbreakable" armies of Daemon, Tomb Kings, and Vampire Counts. Otherwise you can consider this lore if you find initiative and speed are a problem in your current army list.

Death - This is the current "damage" lore in the game and you should take this if you want your mage to deal damage rather then support the rest of your army. An added bonus is that it has the added bonus of generating power dice for your army for every wound you cause (1/3 chance). Finally the spell contains the "Purple Sun", a vortex that travels across the map and auto kills anything it touches which fails an initiative test. This spell is the bane of the Ogre Kingdoms, Lizardmen, Orcs, and the Nurgle Daemons of Chaos.

Shadow - A lore favored by armies with heavy shooting due to spells which can reduce movement and lower toughness. Also well suited for taking down monsters due to spells like Pits of Shades with is an low initiative auto death spell and Mind Razor which greatly raises a units strength for a turn.

Beasts - A decent buff lore which provides the best signature buff spell in the game and allows you to greatly increase the capabilities of your heroes. If you want a cheap buff spell or you want to increase your hero's combat potential, this is a good lore to take.

Heavens - A sort of "meh" lore that provides a hodgepodge of mediocre spells. Overall you might want to avoid this lore unless you are taking a wizard who has a major buff towards Heavens, such as the Lizardmen hero Te'tee'ko

Fire - The worst lore in the main rule book. It's not too terrible, but it's out-shined by every other lore to a good degree. You should only take this for fluff reasons or because you are worried about regenerating monsters and want a fire attack to remove regen.

Of course there is the "special lore" most armies have in their main rulebook. Some of them are much better than the Lores in the Main rulebook and are essential to running your army, like the "Vampire Counts Lore." Others are so laughably bad like the lore of Tzeentch that you really want to stick to the lores in the main rule book. I suggest you look at the individual tactics thread of your race and see how they rate their own lore.

Still the same rule applies, take a Lore that compliments the majority of your army and helps you solve one of your problems.



Wizard Bunkers and Managing Miscasts

As you may have noticed, Wizards aren't too good on the front lines and have a nasty habit of exploding. This creates a bit of a conundrum as you want your Wizard as close to the front line as possible, but you don't want to risk your most valuable troops getting blown to bits.

The answer most players have come up with is the "Wizard Bunker." Basically, you take some of your cheapest troops and use them to "body guard" your wizard. Usually a unit of 15-20 or so guys is good enough that your Wizard should be well defended from enemy fast units, artillery, and spells. Also, if your unit gets blasted a bit from a miscast, it's no big deal.

A good wizard bunker should be as cheap as possible, while protecting your Wizard. Again 15+ is a good number and since you want to avoid combat and you also want to shave off as many extras as you can get away with. Cutting off your command options from the unit is a nice place to start as only a musician might be useful for them, also cutting out things like "shileds" and other options also helps cut down on points.

Another option is to put your wizard in a small unit of shooting troops. Since your Wizard is firing spells from range anyways, expensive missile troops make sense as a place to guard them... so long as the troops are in just two ranks and the wizard is on the very edge in order to minimize the blast.

There are also some alternatives to a Wizard bunker in order to manage miscasts

- The Lore of Life spell "Throne of Vines" allows you to ignore miscasts on a 2+
- If you can give your Wizard a very good ward save (3+ or better) or have him be ethereal, you can relatively run him outside of a unit solo and not have to worry about miscasts as much. He'll still cause himself damage, but the main threat of blowing up your own troops will be mostly gone.
- The High Elves can use the "Banner of The World Dragon" to protect their troops from the ravages of a miscast.

Edit: Finally this thread here goes a bit more in depth into Wizard Bunkers:

http://www.warseer.com/forums/showthread.php?387726-Bunker


Charge Re-directors and Sacrificial Units

The art of charge re-directing is one of the pillars of great Warhammer players and mastering it will certainly help you win in an otherwise tough situation. Effectively, you take a series of very weak and low cost units and sacrifice them like pawns in order to bring a much more expensive enemy unit out of position or delay that unit from attacking your forces by a few turns.

When a unit successfully charges another unit, it must "close the door" and line itself up with the unit that it's charged. The idea is to angle your "charge redirector" in such a way that if your opponent wins combat and overuns/breaks your unit it will have to either move forward into a unit it doesn't want to charge or reform and accept a charge from possibly several of your own units.

For example, lets take this example of a unit of Khorne Bloodcrushers considering a charge against a Lizardmen army's Slann but are blocked by a unit of 10 Skink Coherts. If they charge directly, the Bloodcrushers will slaughter the unit, but the Coherts will be angled in such a way that the Blood Crushers won't be able to get into combat with the Slann for at least another turn, leaving it open to charges from the rest of the Lizardmen Amry. However, if they sit tight and not charge, they'll get blasted by spells from the Slann.

It's advisable that you should take at least a couple of "Charge Redirecting Suicide Units" into your army if only as an alternative way to deal with Deathstars and other units that may spoil your fun.



Tarpits

Another form of "sacrificial unit", but unlike a "charge Redirector", tarpits are used to hold up an enemy as long as possible without dying.

The general idea is to take a unit that is very difficult to kill and is unlikly to break or flee from your opponent and use it to hold up an enemy unit which is a threat to your forces. For most armies, this means taking some of your cheapest infantry units and ranking them up so they'll be steadfast. Then march them straight at the enemy unit you think might give you trouble.

A decent tarpit should consist of about 30 models, in ranks of 5 and 6 deep or better and placed within range of your battlestandard bearer. That will hold off threats like enemy monsters for a few turns as they try and munch through your infantry.

Some other examples of tarpits:

- Perhaps the most infamous tarpits are the massed 100 man units of Skaven Slaves and Goblin seen in the Skaven and Orc armies respectivly. The Skaven Slave tarpit is especially frightening because the Skaven can fire their artillery into it even if the Slaves are in Close Combat.
- Many armies have "swarm" units which can be theoretically used as tarpits. However, they are suprisingly terrible in the job and are rarely a cost effective solution.
- The Vampire Counts are particularly good at continuing the "raise" units of Zombies and Skeletons in order to tarpit enemy units.
- Dwarf Slayers are unbreakable infantry that should be good tarpits, but currently die so quickly and are so expensive that they are again not a very cost effective solution
- Empire Great Swords and Dark Elf Black Guard are both stubborn units which can be used as an effective, albiet expensive, tarpit.
- Characters wearing the Crown of Command always make decent tarpits. A "cowboy" hero with the Crown of Command with a +1 armor save can tie up several kinds of units without breaking a sweat. The Lizardmen Saurus are particularly known for this.



Hammers

A Hammer unit is a unit designed to have lots of high strength attacks to destroy enemy units. These units should be the work force of your army and the units your enemy fears the most.

The signatures of a good hammer unit are:

- Hits with Strength 5 or higher
- Lots of attacks. (At least 15 attacks)
- And either should be likely to hit before your opponent, or have a very good armor/regen/ward save (4+ or better)
- At least a total of 20 wounds or higher. Anything less and your hammer will be eaten up by magic and missile fire.

In a 2000pt game you should try and have at least two units in your army capable of this kind of damage output.

Some examples of Hammers

- Chaos Warriors in units of 20+ and armed with halbreds always make excellent hammers.
- High Elves and Dark Elves White Lions and Executioners make great hammers respectively
- Usually Strength 4 doesn't cut it, regardless of the number of attacks. Saurus Warriors, even in units of 30, will always have problems taking down Chaos Warrior units.
- Also sheer number of attacks also doesn't help that much. A horded unit of Dark Elf Witch Elves will usually lose to a unit of 10 knights despite their massive number of attacks. The same goes for a horded unit of Skaven Clan Rats facing off against the same knights.

Anvil

From Kahadras

The Anvil differs from the Tarpit in the fact that it isn't just there to hold up an enemy unit but to grind it down in combat without the need for another unit to help. While a Hammer unit aims to do a lot of damage in a short space of time the Anvil aims to win over time. Like Tarpits the Anvil likes having plenty of warm bodies to absorb punnishment but are also looking to deal damage back to whatever they are fighting against. Good examples of an Anvil are units like Phoenix Guard, Saurus Warriors and Grave Guard.

They are all reasonably good in combat. The Phoenix Guard have ASF, can attack in an extra rank, come with a base WS of 5 and have a halberd for strength 4 attacks. The Saurus get two attacks each at strength 4 with the Predatory fighter special rule. Grave Guard only get a single strength 4 attack each but they do get the Killing blow special rule. All three units are pretty tough. The Phoenix Guard can fall back on their 4+ ward save. The Sarus are toughness 4, with a 4+ save and a parry save in combat. Grave Guard are toughness 4 with a 4+ armour save, get a parry save in combat and can regain models thanks to Invocation of Nehek from the Lore of the Vampires. All three units have good leadership. The Phoenix Guard have a base leadership of 9. Saurus have the Cold Blooded ability which allows them to roll 3d6 dice in leadership tests and discard the highest die. Grave Guard are undead and therefore Unbreakable.

Shadoer
10-01-2014, 11:08
Ok, I think I covered a bunch of Army Design stuff. Does anyone have any thoughts or would like to add anything?

I think next it would be a good idea to discuss common Character builds and how to use Characters in your army list.

Jinxed Mojo
10-01-2014, 11:59
As a relative new player I have to say this is gold. Well explained, good examples, great work. I think this will help a lot of new players, cheers!

Shadoer
13-01-2014, 16:29
As a relative new player I have to say this is gold. Well explained, good examples, great work. I think this will help a lot of new players, cheers!

Thx man, means a lot to me :)



On another note, I'm going to try and collect links in the opening post for other threads/articles that a new player might want to read. If anyone has them, feel free to post them.

Belthelas
19-01-2014, 13:35
As a relative new player I have to say this is gold. Well explained, good examples, great work. I think this will help a lot of new players, cheers!

I'll second this! I've been reading the forums for quite a while as I have been painting my High Elves but never really got the hang of some of the terms and tactics. This is a great thread and I will be checking in regularly for more tips!

Shadoer
29-01-2014, 10:50
Ok to kick of character creation, I'm going to do a quick review of our common magical items starting with Magical Weapons:


Magic Weapons

Strength Weapons (Giant Blade for +3 / Ogre Blade +2 / Sword of Might +1

Rating: 3/5

Description: Strength bonus weapons have the benefit that they still allow you to take a shield on your Character and that you won't suffer a penalty like "Always Strike Last" for the equivalent bonus from something like a Great Weapon. It's not a bad choice if you want to deal damage but still have the defense bonus of a shield.

Extra Attack Weapons (Sword of Bloodshed +3 / Sword of Strive +2 / Sword of Battle +1)

Rating: 2.5/5

Description: Gives your character an extra attack and allows you to use a shield. If your character has a base strength of 4, this option isn't that great an idea as Str 4 isn't good enough to get past toughness or armor. On the odds, you'd be better off with a Strength Option. However for armies like Lizardmen, this suddenly becomes an attractive option. As Saurus Hero's have a base Strength of 5 or higher and gain extra attacks for every 6 they roll on their initial set of attacks, this becomes a much more attractive option

Obsidian Blade

Rating: 3/5

Description: A weapon that doesn't make many list, the Obisdian Blade allows you to ignore armor saves. Good for a hero that has either a lot of attacks and you need a canopener. (Dark Elf Hag Witch Elves are good carriers of this blade)

Fencer's Blade

Rating: 4/5

Description: A popular choice, this option gives you Weapon Skill 10 and effectively another attack as it's effectively two weapons. However the real selling point is that most enemy units will require a 5+ to hit you in close combat thanks to Weapon Skill 10 and most enemy hero's will need at least a 4+ to hit you.

Combo Alert: Glittering Scales isn't a bad item to combine with the Fencer's Blade. Effectively, you get a hero that needs a 6+ to hit in Close Combat for most enemy units and a 5+ for their characters to hit you.

Sword of the Anti Hero

Rating: 2.5/5

Description: Give you +1 Attack and Strength for every hero in base combat with you. It sounds like a great weapon, and it's a decent price, but most of the time you want to kill enemy troops where you won't get any bonuses against them.

Spellthieving Sword

Rating: 0/5

Description: So if you hit a wizard, it loses a randomly determined spell. If Wizards weren't so squishy this might be a better option, but currently it's just better to kill them outright and the Spellthieving Sword doesn't help with that.

Sword of Swiftslaying

Rating:2/5

Description: Gives Always Strike First. Not a bad option if your character has a high initiative and a high base strength like Chaos Warriors. Then you'll strike first and get those precious rerolls to hit. Unfortunately most armies that could take advantage of it (elves) already have ASF.

Berserker Sword

Rating: 1/5

Description: Gives you Frenzy... so a whole +1 attack, immune to psych until you lose frenzy, and you get to take constant leadership tests to see if you are going to charge a near by enemy. If you really want the extra attack, the Sword of battle will give it to you for the same number of points without the pitfalls.

Gold Sigil Sword

Rating: 2/5

Description: Attacks are made at Initiative 10. Sort of meh as there are other ways to boost your initiative.

Sword of Striking

Rating: 4/5

Description: Gives +1 to hit. Useful for characters that already have a high base Strength and Wpn Skill. It also has effectively become standard equipment on Daemon Princes. The biggest selling point though is that it's really cheap for what it does as it's bonus to hit is in many ways better than having an extra attack but doesn't cost anywhere near the same number of points.

Biting Blade

Rating: 1/5

Description: Gives armor piercing. It's cheap and that's about all it's good for.

Relic Sword

Rating: 1/5

Description: Allows you to wound anything on a 5+. Not bad, except you can wound anything on a 5+ or less if you boost your strength anyways.

Shirking Blade

Rating: 2/5

Description: It gives the wearer fear. Again sort of meh as there are plenty of other ways to get fear and fear doesn't do that much.

Tormentor Sword

Rating: 2/5

Description: Anything taking a wound from this weapon gains "Stupidity". Not a bad option considering it's dirt cheap in points. Unfortunately since stupidity doesn't effect close combat, the "Stupidity" is more of a spite left if you failed to kill whatever you tried to and failed.

Warrior Bane

Rating: 3.5/5

Description. Anything taking a wound from this weapon loses an attack. A much more practical option over the Tormentor Sword as it will actually help you win combat and is still a dirt cheap weapon. Useful for Characters who already have a high base strength.

Kahadras
29-01-2014, 13:39
In intermediate army design I think you need to talk about the Anvil unit.

The Anvil differs from the Tarpit in the fact that it isn't just there to hold up an enemy unit but to grind it down in combat without the need for another unit to help. While a Hammer unit aims to do a lot of damage in a short space of time the Anvil aims to win over time. Like Tarpits the Anvil likes having plenty of warm bodies to absorb punnishment but are also looking to deal damage back to whatever they are fighting against. Good examples of an Anvil are units like Phoenix Guard, Saurus Warriors and Grave Guard.

They are all reasonably good in combat. The Phoenix Guard have ASF, can attack in an extra rank, come with a base WS of 5 and have a halberd for strength 4 attacks. The Saurus get two attacks each at strength 4 with the Predatory fighter special rule. Grave Guard only get a single strength 4 attack each but they do get the Killing blow special rule. All three units are pretty tough. The Phoenix Guard can fall back on their 4+ ward save. The Sarus are toughness 4, with a 4+ save and a parry save in combat. Grave Guard are toughness 4 with a 4+ armour save, get a parry save in combat and can regain models thanks to Invocation of Nehek from the Lore of the Vampires. All three units have good leadership. The Phoenix Guard have a base leadership of 9. Saurus have the Cold Blooded ability which allows them to roll 3d6 dice in leadership tests and discard the highest die. Grave Guard are undead and therefore Unbreakable.

Shadoer
30-01-2014, 08:30
In intermediate army design I think you need to talk about the Anvil unit.

The Anvil differs from the Tarpit in the fact that it isn't just there to hold up an enemy unit but to grind it down in combat without the need for another unit to help. While a Hammer unit aims to do a lot of damage in a short space of time the Anvil aims to win over time. Like Tarpits the Anvil likes having plenty of warm bodies to absorb punnishment but are also looking to deal damage back to whatever they are fighting against. Good examples of an Anvil are units like Phoenix Guard, Saurus Warriors and Grave Guard.

They are all reasonably good in combat. The Phoenix Guard have ASF, can attack in an extra rank, come with a base WS of 5 and have a halberd for strength 4 attacks. The Saurus get two attacks each at strength 4 with the Predatory fighter special rule. Grave Guard only get a single strength 4 attack each but they do get the Killing blow special rule. All three units are pretty tough. The Phoenix Guard can fall back on their 4+ ward save. The Sarus are toughness 4, with a 4+ save and a parry save in combat. Grave Guard are toughness 4 with a 4+ armour save, get a parry save in combat and can regain models thanks to Invocation of Nehek from the Lore of the Vampires. All three units have good leadership. The Phoenix Guard have a base leadership of 9. Saurus have the Cold Blooded ability which allows them to roll 3d6 dice in leadership tests and discard the highest die. Grave Guard are undead and therefore Unbreakable.

Excellent. Incorporated what you wrote in.

Thanks man :)

Shadoer
30-01-2014, 08:51
Magic Armor

Armor of Destiny

Rating: 4/5

Description: One of the best armor options in the main rulebook, you get a 4+ ward save and also add in heavy armor for a cheap price.

Trickster's Helm

Rating: 2/5

Description: Forces a re-roll of successful wounds against the bearer and gives an extra point of armor. It's potentially useful on high toughness characters like Vampires but otherwise is a bit overcosted for what it does.

Armour of Silverd Steel

Rating: 3/5

Description: Gives you a 2+ Armor Save. Not that useful for armies that have a lot of armor options for their characters, but is a godsend for armies like Skaven that only have pitiful heavy armor to put onto their heroes. \

Armour of Fortune

Rating: 4/5

Description: Like the Armor of Destiny except it's cheaper and gives a 5+ ward Save

Helm of Discord

Rating: 2.5/5

Description: A theoretically awesome item that can disable an enemy character provided they fail a leadership test. Unfortunately, the odds of failing that leadership test is low unless in an age of Battle Standard bearers allowing you to reroll all psychology tests. Has some potential in an army like Dark Elves where you have units and spells that lower enemy leadership.

Glittering Scales

Rating: 3.5/5

Description: A brilliant item that makes close combat attacks hit at -1 that would be a 5/5 item if it wasn't light armor instead of heavy armor. Still a solid choice that can make your character difficult to hit and pairs well with other items. Also has some truly nasty builds with Empire Magic Items and the Mark of Nurgle.

Shield of Ptolos

Rating: 3/5

Description: An underrated item that gives you a 1+ armor save against shooting attacks. Pretty good for characters that you want to run harassment but are worried they'll be picked off by non-artillery shooting.

Spellsheild

Rating: 2/5

Description: Gives a free shield and a point of magic resistance. Would be not bad if there weren't a ton of cheaper options.

Gambler's Armour

Rating: 4/5

Description: See Armour of Destiny

Dragon Helm

Rating: 5/5

Description: A fantastic item that gives you a point of armor and a 2+ Ward Save against flaming attacks. Useful for any character with points to spare and you want to increase their armor while allowing them to be able to tank enemy units with flaming attacks. Also, incredibly useful for any character that might be flammable (I'm looking at you Tomb Kings)

Enchanted Shield

Rating: 4/5

Description: A cheap item that's an economically sound way of getting a shield and an extra point of armor.

Charmed Shield

Rating: 5/5

Description: An essential item for any monstrous mount build, the charmed shield gives a 2+ save against the first hit against the bearer. Doesn't sound like much except it effectively allows your squishy character to survive a hit from a cannonball without too much hassle. So if you plan on running a dragon or carnasaur, consider taking this cheap item.

Danger-Russ
01-02-2014, 21:57
Shadoer

While I am not necessarily a 'new player' , but a returning one after a long hiatus, I really appreciate the article. I especially like the rating on the common magic items as I try to get a handle on the changes since my departure from the hobby.


Keep it up.

D-R

Lord Solar Plexus
02-02-2014, 15:25
One needs to remember that the rating of any item can vary drastically from the PoV of a different faction. Armour of Destiny / Fortune are pretty bad for Empire or WoC, as they prevent a much better armour save and you can usually get more mileage out of the two warding talismans. In the same vein, I'd class an enchanted shield as 5/5 because it gives one character a 2+ AS on foot (fullplate/chaos armour) for a pittance.

Some statistics could be helpful for a newcomer to be able to make a basic threat or success assessment: 186457

Knifeparty
02-02-2014, 16:02
This is a very good idea, great job to the OP!

That being said, I disagree with the scores you've given many of the magic weapons. Remember too that many of these magic weapons vary in usage from army to army. Of course a High Elf army will never take the sword of swift slaying, they already have ASF. But a Doombull with the Sword of Swift Slaying is a monster!

Strength Weapons: 5/5

If you are going for magic weapons, these guys are your meat and potato's. If you have any kind of beatstick (there's another common name you could add to the list. It means fighting character) hero in your army and you have points for a magic weapon, usually it's going to be something like an ogre blade. +2 strength at regular initiative is why Vampire Blender Lords work.
Even the humble sword of strength is great if you have a few points left over and want to be strength 5 or 6.

Multiple Attack Weapons: 5/5 if you have hero's with strength of 5 already or has a combo magic item. 2.5 if your hero is strength 4.

These weapons need to be combo'd with other magic items most of the time, unless your lord is actually base strength 5 or higher. If you take the potion of strength with the Sword of Bloodshed you can get 7 strength 7 attacks on a normal lord for one round of combat. That is enough to break a strong unit of knights.
Combo Alert: Bretonnian Lord with the Virtue of Heroic Killing Blow and the Sword of Bloodshed has 7 attacks with heroic killing blow, this is a scary combo that can threaten Daemon Princes, Steam Tanks, and kind of monster and the entire Ogre Kingdom Army.

Sword of Anti-Hero's: 1-5/5 depending on who's using it and how many enemy hero's are around
This weapon is brutally good on Vampire Lords and Doombulls for a reasonable price.

Sword of Swift Slaying: 4/5 for any hero that isn't an Elf and has a base strength of 5. 2/5 for any hero who has base strength 4. 0/5 for Elves.
Giving ASF to a Chaos Lord or Doombull is scary business. Even a regular Vampire Hero with this sword and Red Fury is great against rank and file units. The keeper of secrets with this weapon is terrifying.

Obsidian Blade: 4/5 for hero's with strength 5. 2/5 with hero's with strength 4.
This weapon is downright scary on Vampire, Chaos, Lizardmen lords. They are also great on a Dark Elf Hag because she can join a cauldron of blood and re-roll wounds. Downside is that it is expensive.

Everything else is fairly useless. Remember sometimes you just need to put any kind of magical attacks into your army to deal with etherial creatures and the rest of these magic weapons are cheap enough to put in just to have one handy.

Shadoer
03-02-2014, 22:39
One needs to remember that the rating of any item can vary drastically from the PoV of a different faction.

Oh yes, you are absolutely right. I did try to make that point in some of the item descriptions but I might not have made it clear enough or I made it a bit too general. I'll go back and do a bit of a review and try and make that point more clear :)[/QUOTE]



Armour of Destiny / Fortune are pretty bad for Empire or WoC, as they prevent a much better armour save and you can usually get more mileage out of the two warding talismans. In the same vein, I'd class an enchanted shield as 5/5 because it gives one character a 2+ AS on foot (fullplate/chaos armour) for a pittance.

Erm I'd say it depends, if we are going into the nitty gritty. Like the Armor of Destiny for Warriors of Chaos isn't that good for Heroes with the Mark of Slannessh or Khorne which doesn't give you any built in defense bonus, but it's a god send for someone running the Mark of Tzeentch or Nurgle. With Tzeentch you get a 3+ ward save which you could reroll a 1 on and for Nurgle you already have a nice close combat defense bonus but probably want an extra ward save for those special attacks coming at him (Cannon Balls, Attacks that bypass armor)

Then there's the point that if you want to run the Dawn Stone (reroll for failed armor saves) you want to take a Ward Save on your armor as opposed to a Talismen. You'll be shot out 1 point of armor, but you'll get the reroll and a 4+ ward.

The thing is there are only two 4+ Ward Saves available in the main rulebook and I'd say if you want to give a 4+ Ward to two or more hero's it's better to take the hit to armor. However, you're right, I should probably clear that up under the Armor of Destiny and maybe lower the rating a bit.

As for the Enchanted Shield, yeah you're probably right, I should give it a 5. Fact is it is super efficient that you get two points of Armor for only 5 points.



Some statistics could be helpful for a newcomer to be able to make a basic threat or success assessment: 186457

Aww man this is awesome! I need to work this into the opening somehow.

Thanks!

Shadoer
03-02-2014, 22:47
This is a very good idea, great job to the OP!

Thx man, appreciate it.



That being said, I disagree with the scores you've given many of the magic weapons. Remember too that many of these magic weapons vary in usage from army to army. Of course a High Elf army will never take the sword of swift slaying, they already have ASF. But a Doombull with the Sword of Swift Slaying is a monster!

Yeah you're right, I should make that point clear about initiative. Like it's a good weapon for Warriors of Chaos and Vampires as well.



Strength Weapons: 5/5

If you are going for magic weapons, these guys are your meat and potato's. If you have any kind of beatstick (there's another common name you could add to the list. It means fighting character) hero in your army and you have points for a magic weapon, usually it's going to be something like an ogre blade. +2 strength at regular initiative is why Vampire Blender Lords work.
Even the humble sword of strength is great if you have a few points left over and want to be strength 5 or 6.

Err I'm not so sure. Your right it's good for a Vampire Blender Lord and stuff, but in terms of efficiency you can get similar results for a lot less points in the mundane equivalent. However I should probably make the point about magical attacks and that there's a choice involved in designing your character



Multiple Attack Weapons: 5/5 if you have hero's with strength of 5 already or has a combo magic item. 2.5 if your hero is strength 4.

These weapons need to be combo'd with other magic items most of the time, unless your lord is actually base strength 5 or higher. If you take the potion of strength with the Sword of Bloodshed you can get 7 strength 7 attacks on a normal lord for one round of combat. That is enough to break a strong unit of knights.
Combo Alert: Bretonnian Lord with the Virtue of Heroic Killing Blow and the Sword of Bloodshed has 7 attacks with heroic killing blow, this is a scary combo that can threaten Daemon Princes, Steam Tanks, and kind of monster and the entire Ogre Kingdom Army.

Err I think I made this point already, but your right I could make it more clear. Maybe I should give more than one rating depending on the Str or Initative of an item.




Sword of Anti-Hero's: 1-5/5 depending on who's using it and how many enemy hero's are around
This weapon is brutally good on Vampire Lords and Doombulls for a reasonable price.

Well that's the problem, it's rare you are going to have more than 1 hero around and it doesn't help for killing troops. Maybe if you have a high base strength already, it is more useful.



Obsidian Blade: 4/5 for hero's with strength 5. 2/5 with hero's with strength 4.
This weapon is downright scary on Vampire, Chaos, Lizardmen lords. They are also great on a Dark Elf Hag because she can join a cauldron of blood and re-roll wounds. Downside is that it is expensive.

Ok I'm really seeing your right, I do need to make a distinction between strength, or at least make it more clear than what I have described.



Everything else is fairly useless. Remember sometimes you just need to put any kind of magical attacks into your army to deal with ethereal creatures and the rest of these magic weapons are cheap enough to put in just to have one handy.

That's a good point. I should point out the threat of ethereal creatures and make a point that you might want to spend those 5 points on something that can kill them.

Shadoer
03-02-2014, 22:48
Shadoer

While I am not necessarily a 'new player' , but a returning one after a long hiatus, I really appreciate the article. I especially like the rating on the common magic items as I try to get a handle on the changes since my departure from the hobby.


Keep it up.

D-R

Thx man, I will :)

Kahadras
04-02-2014, 00:29
As for the Enchanted Shield, yeah you're probably right, I should give it a 5. Fact is it is super efficient that you get two points of Armor for only 5 points.

When you concider the fact that Lords normaly pay around 3 points for a normal shield and Heroes pay around 2 the Enchanted Shield looks a really good deal.

Kahadras
09-02-2014, 17:14
I've noticed that nobody's mentioned the importance of deciding on what type of general to run. Especialy in smaller games (2000 points or less) you're probably only going to be able to take one Lord choice and whatever you go for will have a knock on effect with the rest of the army. While different armies have different lord choices the choice can be boiled down to either a combat lord or a magic lord. Although there are variations on the theme, which I'll discuss later, it's the most basic choice after deciding what army you want to play.

Combat Lords - The name 'combat lord' can be a bit misleading as it indicates that the character has to be in combat in order to do his job (which is not always the case). So what are the advantages of taking a 'combat' lord over a magic casting one? For this I'm going to compare a basic General of the Empire to a Battle Wizard Lord from the Empire army book (to keep things as simple as possible). The first thing we notice is that the General has better stats than the Wizard Lord. He has a better weapon skill, better ballistic skill, better strength, better initative, more attacks and a better leadership. We'd also notice that he's significantly cheaper in terms of points. Looking at his options we can see that the General can be outfitted with a variety of weapons and armour giving him access to ranged weapons (pistol, longbow and hangun), more options for fighting in close combat (extra hand weapon and great weapon) and a better armour save (full plate armour, heavy armour and shield). So in summery then. The General has better stats, has more equipment options and (at base cost) is significantly cheaper than the Wizard Lord.

There are a couple of ways that a 'combat' lord can be set up. The first way is for combat. In this instance the primary goal is to get the character into combat where he can bring his superior stats to bear. In this case you want him to be mobile (so he can get into combat quickly), well armoured (so he can survive returning attacks) and equipt to deal damage (a magic weapon of some desciption). I've highlighted a couple of examples of a General of the Empire set up in this way....

1. General of the Empire + Barded steed + Full plate armour + shield + Dawnstone + Ogre blade.

2. General of the Empire + Griffon + Full plate armour + Enchanted shield + Sword of Might.

The other way to set up your combat lord is for survival. In this case you want to keep him alive so he can provide his leadership bubble to the rest of the army arther than running him off to beat up enemy units. In this case mobility isn't so important as you want to keep him with the rest of your army but you do want him to be as tough as possible to keep him alive. You also want to try to keep him cheap as you want to spend the points you save on units which will deal damage to the enemy. I've provided an example of how I think a tough General of the Empire should be set up...

3. General of the Empire + full plate armour + Enchanted shield + Dawnstone.

So we have three different builds all of which demand slightly different things from the rest of the army. Option one would work best with a big unit of Knights for him to lead. If he's by himself he'd be vulnerable and unable to deal with big enemy units so having him running with another mobile unit is an obvious advantage. Option two can deal more damage thanks to the Griffon that he's riding but he's vulnerable to warmachine fire. In this situation you might want light cavalry to deal with enemy warmachines or your own warmachines to provide counter battery fire. Option three works best in the center of you battleline. He possibly wants a nice big infantry unit to hide in an plenty of other units to remain close so he can grant them his leadership as well.

If you take a combat lord for a Lord choice the first thing you want to look at for Hero options is a Wizard to provide magical defense. While not as effective as a Wizard Lord the Wizard can carry a Dispel Magic Scroll to provide a hard counter to at least one spell your opponant is going to throw at you and at least gives you a chance of stopping other spells he tries to cast.


Magic Lord - The magic lord does exactly what he says on the tin, casts magic. These spells can deal damage to enemy units, debuff enemy units or buff your own. Depending on what Lore you decide to take (and what spells you roll up) will effect what kind of support the magic lord lends to the army. While they don't (usualy) have the stats of a combat character magic lords really aren't supposed to get in combat and are best sitting back supporting the army from the safety of their bunker. While there are plenty of builds for combat lords magic lords are usualy more straight forward. The most important upgrade is takling them from a level 3 to a level 4 magic caster as it gives them +1 to cast, +1 to dispel and an extra spell which is well worth the points cost you pay for it. Am example of a Battle Wizard build would be...

Battle Wizard Lord (Lore of Life) + extra level.

He's got a good lore that he can use to support other units in his army and he's got the extra level to give him as many spells as possible. While I could outfit him with some magic items I've decided to try to keep his points down so I can maximise the amount of points I've got to spend elsewhere. It also has be pointed out that, while magic lords seems very powerful, they are somewhat at the mercy of the magic phase. A couple of poor rolls on the winds of magic or a bad miscast can be very painful. On the other hand a Wizard can change the course of a game with a well placed spell.

When looking at Hero options the first thing a magic lord army probably wants to look at is a BSB who provides a bubble leadership roll which can help shore up the fact that the a wizards leadership is rarely anything to write home about.


In summary making a choice between what type of Lord you want can greatly impact on the Heroes that you take and what other units you might want to invest in.

Lord Solar Plexus
09-02-2014, 17:49
Good post, Kahadras.

When making an army list, make a little mental (or physical, or digital) checklist of common things you might encounter. For example, you could see a horde - how are you going to deal with it tactically, in-game, and what do you have to get its points? What can you do against armour, combat lords, magic? How are you going to deal with opposing skirmishers or light cavalry? Do you have a source of flaming or magical attacks? Anti-monster stuff? and so on. Also, try to think of scenarios or what ifs. What happens if you have one tool and it is destroyed or neutralized? Do you have some backup or redundancy?

GuroG
10-02-2014, 07:04
Cheers lads have had a good read of this thread many thanks