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strongbow
02-06-2014, 21:22
http://careers.games-workshop.com/2014/06/02/new-release-range-coordinator-nottingham-uk/

Was wondering what everyone's take on this is?

I was wondering if it's a role that means that whoever gets it will be contacting customers in order to ascertain what works well/what doesn't, to get some kind of feedback on what people want in releases.

On the other hand it almost sounds like a sales rep role, just worded differently. Does anyone else see this?

Thanks.

AlexHolker
02-06-2014, 21:25
It sounds like the job involves deciding how best to screw the independents by making things Direct Only.

strongbow
02-06-2014, 21:30
Why do you think that?

EDIT: I ask only out of interest, I would like to understand why you think that and what you leads you to think that.

Tay051173096
02-06-2014, 21:34
cuts out the middle man when done right (good for GW, Not good for indies)

Reinholt
02-06-2014, 22:05
I think it's telling that they are hiring for this role based primarily on a cover letter and attitude when this kind of thing, at most firms, are hired for on the basis of skills (often statistics, economics, or accounting).

This kind of practice gives a window into why GW makes such baffling decisions: I suspect, often, they don't know any better. It's like hiring a 3-year old to be your fire marshal.

AlexHolker
03-06-2014, 02:14
Why do you think that?
Because "the most appropriate channel" is almost certainly the one that funnels as much money as possible through the GW online store (because of the better margins), and not the ones that expand the breadth of GW's customer base.

Samsonov
03-06-2014, 02:23
Could this be related to the citadel vault, as discussed on this forum? Perhaps the job may involve someone deciding what old models need to come back.

Poncho160
03-06-2014, 03:52
I obviously know nothing about hiring people in a multi million pound company, but surely skills and experience are slightly more important than attitude?

Attitude to work is obviously important, but more important than possessing the right skills to do the job?

Just seems a weird thing to put in a job advert. Might be standard corporate wording for all I know though. :)

TonyFlow
03-06-2014, 03:57
"It may also help to include an up-to-date CV."

WTF??? So skills and experience take the backseat to motivation? That is weird!

Nicolivoldkif
03-06-2014, 04:45
I obviously know nothing about hiring people in a multi million pound company, but surely skills and experience are slightly more important than attitude?

Attitude to work is obviously important, but more important than possessing the right skills to do the job?

Just seems a weird thing to put in a job advert. Might be standard corporate wording for all I know though. :)

Cover letters are often important, if for nothing less as it shows you put forth some effort and its another way to helps cut out the chaff. Cover letters are also a good place for potential employees to put stuff that is not resume material but may be something you want the prospective employer to know. So its not uncommon to see a Cover letter requirement, though its the first I've seen where only a letter is the requirement with no resume for job experience reference.

BaloOrk
03-06-2014, 05:22
"New Release Range Coordinator"
I thought this was about some fancy new tape measure

Hellebore
03-06-2014, 05:33
I think it's telling that they are hiring for this role based primarily on a cover letter and attitude when this kind of thing, at most firms, are hired for on the basis of skills (often statistics, economics, or accounting).

This kind of practice gives a window into why GW makes such baffling decisions: I suspect, often, they don't know any better. It's like hiring a 3-year old to be your fire marshal.

Dear Mr Boss,

I've ALWAYS wanted to be a fireman! You wear cool hats, carry cool axes and drive cool trucks! I think your company is the bestest ever and would love to be your fire marshal, because I love being a fireman and love your company.

Signed,

Johnny Shitshispants

Hellebore

Voss
03-06-2014, 06:19
I obviously know nothing about hiring people in a multi million pound company, but surely skills and experience are slightly more important than attitude?

Not for a job like this. This does all but explicitly state that it is a 'yes-man' position. The job is: make decisions no one is going to like, and do it in the way that management tells you to with no backchat.

The de-emphasis on CV and the like also tell me that this is probably not a long term job, and there is no way in hell you could build a career on it.

The language throughout the document just makes me cringe, and reminds me of Reinholdt's thread, specifically the bit on consumer relations. Partially its because I'm going through the joys of professional job applications again, but most at least pay lip service to some concept of professional development (of the applicant), benefits, what benefit the organization passes along to other people, some sort of larger context, who you'll be working with or... something. Not just.... that.

Here's what I get out of this:

About the Job

Do you want to help Games Workshop decide on the most appropriate channel a product should be sold through?
Move things to direct only.


Are you excited by gathering information and working across the business to make sure we sell the right product to the right internal and external customers?
Spreadsheets and maybe some feedback from distributors/stores.


You will be responsible for analysing and collating data and talking to key stakeholders to ensure that each product is sold in the most appropriate channel to meet the current sales strategies.
And I say maybe because the key stakeholders suddenly take over here. Yes, they matter. But the emphasis suddenly becomes about them and whatever these 'sales strategies' are. Off my head, I can't tell you what they are, and they'll likely stay a mystery until after the applicant is hired.


You will then communicate with our key customers appropriately.
Ouch. Delivering bad news. Good thing no one gets killed for that anymore.

You will also be ensuring that all systems are accurate and up to date to an agreed standard.
Up to date systems is good. 'Agreed standards' is not so good if you don't know the who, what and why. [see sales strategies, above]


We know what makes this job hard is using the right information to reach the best solutions for Games Workshop.
But notably, not their partners, customers, or even stakeholders anymore. Real bad sign.


Working at Games Workshop

At Games Workshop we are looking for people who will do their best to understand the needs of the company and to put those needs first when they are at work. Because of this we believe that what you are like, hence the attitude you show to work and the way you choose to behave is even more important than your skills or experience.
Yes, sir, thank you sir, may I lick your boots sir!



Other Essential Information

Closing date: Applications must be received by midnight, UK time, on 15 June 2014.
This is the only bit that doesn't make me outright cringe, but some salary and benefit information would be nice, even if it is fairly common for companies not to include it.


How to Apply

If you wish to apply you must send us a letter telling us why you want this job. We select candidates for interview on the content of their letters. This is a great opportunity for you to let us know that you understand what we are looking for.

No letter, no interview.
Grovel, worms.


It may also help to include an up-to-date CV.
Your past, future, skills and experience matter very little. Did you finish groveling already?




Cover letters are often important, if for nothing less as it shows you put forth some effort and its another way to helps cut out the chaff. Cover letters are also a good place for potential employees to put stuff that is not resume material but may be something you want the prospective employer to know. So its not uncommon to see a Cover letter requirement, though its the first I've seen where only a letter is the requirement with no resume for job experience reference.
Yes, cover letters are important, but notably not the way they are being asked for here. A good cover letter should build on the resume (flesh it out and give it some context), address specific aspects that are particularly relevant for the specific position (and organization) and explain why the applicant is a good fit. Boiling it down to just attitude is actively missing the point, because at that stage the 'best applicants' are specifically people who can spin BS and talk a good game. There is literally no check here for 'can the applicant actually do the job.'

Notably, it is very hard to do a decent cover letter for the job, since the job description doesn't actually talk about specific skills, systems or software packages. Do you need to give presentations, or are you chatting at Joe Storeowner over the phone? Do you need to know a bit about excel, or do you need real experience with Access, MySQL or other real software? What systems will you be expected to keep up to date? Analysis, statistics, anything? Nope. All they present to you is you must always make the right decision for GW. Whatever you're told that is.

shelfunit.
03-06-2014, 07:28
But notably, not their partners, customers, or even stakeholders anymore. Real bad sign.

That bit stood out for me as well, probably with similar thoughts as yourself.

MiyamatoMusashi
03-06-2014, 08:10
I have made it a general rule in life never to apply for anything where there isn't at least some suggestion of what the salary will be. Granted, most job ads are wildly imprecise, but (a) you get some indication of whether it's worth your time even applying, and (b) it is another clue as to what the job expects. Will this job pay £12K? Fair enough, any muppet can do it, hire for attitude if you like, whatever. £60K? Then they're looking for a really senior-level hire who will be making important, fundamental decisions that will meaningfully affect the future of the company, and most people shouldn't even consider applying.

The real figure is probably somewhere between those two, of course (I suspect a lot closer to the former...), but given how little information they give about what the requirements of the job actually are, a number would be hugely helpful to anyone considering applying.

Apart from that, yeah, what Voss said. This is the vague job ad from hell, apparently (we can only conclude, as we're not told otherwise) for a dogsbody/lackey/do-what-you're-told position, for which the only valued skill is how good you are at ********ting. I guess if that's the kind of job they want to offer, it's up to them, but...

Wayshuba
03-06-2014, 08:28
This job ad is just another symptom of the problem (as is the general Careers at Games Workshop blurb).

There has to be something special in the GW Kool-Aid. Although, this does explain why GW cannot even seem to be able to do Business 101. We have a lot of people with attitude (read "boot-lickers") and very few with skills (especially in business - starting with GW's CEO).

Also, reading a bit into this, I find it rather concerning that hard decisions have already been made (going to only one man stores, moving more than 1,100 products to online only, alienating the independent stockists, etc.), yet two positions as of late have been opened (one visiting all the GW stores on a two year project to tell them how they can sell more product at the stores and this current opening) that focus on telling GW what they should do. Personally, I see intentional fall-guy positions here. When the store model begins to fail, we'll blame it on the suggestions of the new guy in that job. When the recent move to 1,100 products online only, etc. fail, we'll blame it on the new guy in the position.

Does anyone else see the concerning correlation here? It is almost as if they know what they are doing is going to fail (must be the declining financials giving them a clue) and they just want to make sure there is enough "cannon fodder" surrounding them to protect themselves as long as possible.

tristessa
03-06-2014, 09:59
Funny that so many of you say this is symptomatic of the problem when back in the so-called golden age it was a lot more informal.

Nicolivoldkif
03-06-2014, 13:06
Funny that so many of you say this is symptomatic of the problem when back in the so-called golden age it was a lot more informal.
Smaller companies of which GW was back then can be a bit more informal. The problem is when you get larger you have to change management styles to a bit more structured and deliberate style because as you get larger, mistakes get exponentially more painful. At this point in time GW needs to get out of the guys in a garage mentality and actually get some experienced professionals, especially on the marketing side.

Voss
03-06-2014, 14:07
Funny that so many of you say this is symptomatic of the problem when back in the so-called golden age it was a lot more informal.

Informal is actually preferable to this. It isn't right for a lot of organizations, but for an entertainment-based company, it isn't a bad approach to take. You do want to get a sense of the applicant as a person, and if they'll fit into the organization (and if you can stand working with them all day, and the other way around). But you can still get a sense of someone's skills and abilities while being informal, and whether or not they can do the job. This... this is actively soliciting a mindless drone to say yes and (and I agree with Wayshuba here) to take the fall later down the line.



On another topic, I noticed browsing through the other jobs listed, that they are going to be opening new stores in the US for areas that either never had them or haven't had them since the initial push and die back in the 90s. I can't quite figure out what is pushing them to open another half-dozen stores in the US, especially given the iffy nature of GW stores here, especially since half of them are on the back end of nowhere. I'd absolutely love to know their thinking here, but while I can sort of understand Boston (poor hobby shop presence and lots of University kids), Albuquerque, NM (which I lived in not to long ago, and was notable for the number of hobby shops that died 2 years ago), Billings, Montana (!), Lubbock, Texas (?), Sioux Falls, South Dakota (!!) and Eugene, Oregon.... are those really places in dire need of a GW store? What could possibly be the rationale?

Sotek
03-06-2014, 14:58
I obviously know nothing about hiring people in a multi million pound company, but surely skills and experience are slightly more important than attitude?

Attitude to work is obviously important, but more important than possessing the right skills to do the job?

Just seems a weird thing to put in a job advert. Might be standard corporate wording for all I know though. :)

I work for a >million £ company with worldwide distribution. Their whole 'If you wish to apply you must send us a letter telling us why you want this job. We select candidates for interview on the content of their letters. This is a great opportunity for you to let us know that you understand what we are looking for.' looks totally lassez faire and without a proper job description it means they can pick people who they think will fit in the company rather than people who can actually do the job.

Reinholt
03-06-2014, 16:20
On the topic of stores, it's all about cost. If hiring someone in Billings is super cheap, and rent is super cheap, then maybe it does work. Keep in mind the stores are not about revenue, they are about revenue less costs. If your costs are tiny, you might not need much revenue.

So I'm actually not against opening stores in smaller areas if your costs are also smaller. This may not be as dumb as it would appear at first. Also, several of these (Billings and Lubbock) are cities with major universities, so they may be targeting those.

rwphillipsstl
03-06-2014, 18:36
On another topic, I noticed browsing through the other jobs listed, that they are going to be opening new stores in the US for areas that either never had them or haven't had them since the initial push and die back in the 90s. I can't quite figure out what is pushing them to open another half-dozen stores in the US, especially given the iffy nature of GW stores here, especially since half of them are on the back end of nowhere. I'd absolutely love to know their thinking here, but while I can sort of understand Boston (poor hobby shop presence and lots of University kids), Albuquerque, NM (which I lived in not to long ago, and was notable for the number of hobby shops that died 2 years ago), Billings, Montana (!), Lubbock, Texas (?), Sioux Falls, South Dakota (!!) and Eugene, Oregon.... are those really places in dire need of a GW store? What could possibly be the rationale?

I think you stumbled on to something really important--the connection among these locations is all are college towns: Eugene is the university of Oregon, Lubbock is Texas tech University (which is BIG), Billings is Montana State University, and Sioux Falls is the University of South Dakota. I think a new theme in GW marketing is emerging to keep up with its old teen customers as they go to college, and maybe grab new college kids. This is actually REALLY interesting.

Coldhatred
03-06-2014, 20:49
I think a new theme in GW marketing is emerging to keep up with its old teen customers as they go to college, and maybe grab new college kids.

That just makes me giggle if it's true. My hardest potential sells when I managed a GW store was college students. They simply either don't have the money or are most assuredly already allocating the little they do have towards other expenses or activities.

Reinholt
03-06-2014, 22:29
That just makes me giggle if it's true. My hardest potential sells when I managed a GW store was college students. They simply either don't have the money or are most assuredly already allocating the little they do have towards other expenses or activities.

Even worse, those little s--ts know about the internet! How dare they!

There is a double edged sword to pitching to college kids, and it's exactly what you said. Honestly, I actually think it's a great market for wargaming... if you have the right cost of entry. GW has nuked themselves here, though.

rwphillipsstl
03-06-2014, 22:46
Maybe pitching to college kids is going to be linked to the "new, improved" Warhammer with smaller blocks of troops, lower entry point, etc.?

Verm1s
04-06-2014, 01:01
Maybe GW are targeting the 'ironic' demographic. :shifty:

Gorbad Ironclaw
04-06-2014, 06:10
It looks like the "we don't care about skills, just have the right attitude" blurb is standard across all their recruitment posts. Even for things like IT technicians, retail supply managers and planning managers. Because thinking GW is great is way more important than actual skill in logistical and technical positions.

frozenwastes
04-06-2014, 09:01
The absolute worst thing possible is a know-nothing IT guy that's also a corporate yes-man. Those guys make other employee's work impossible.

strongbow
04-06-2014, 18:07
I did see one position where there was a requirement for some IT knowledge.

In their defence, they do state that they would train people who they think have 'potential'. Some roles (like logistics and IT I imagine), may well only attract people with those skills already. They don't rule out skills as important. Anyone can be a yes-man, but if one candidate has 20 years of experience and another 0, I'd guess that the one with experience would have the edge (if both were yes-men). Apologies for the stereotype, but it wouldn't surprise me if people in the Hobby are over-represented in IT fields.

Thanks for posting your opinions everyone, I was thinking of applying for this role (I'd really like to work for GW in some capacity in Nottingham), and tbh the yes-man and fall-guy stuff is putting me off a bit. I really thought this would be a role to bring real vision and ambition to improve GW sales and turn things around, using feedback from customers and data to inform a strong sales policy that shows consideration for hobbyists whilst improving GW's numbers. Maybe that isn't possible.

Reinholt
04-06-2014, 18:40
I did see one position where there was a requirement for some IT knowledge.

In their defence, they do state that they would train people who they think have 'potential'. Some roles (like logistics and IT I imagine), may well only attract people with those skills already. They don't rule out skills as important. Anyone can be a yes-man, but if one candidate has 20 years of experience and another 0, I'd guess that the one with experience would have the edge (if both were yes-men). Apologies for the stereotype, but it wouldn't surprise me if people in the Hobby are over-represented in IT fields.

Thanks for posting your opinions everyone, I was thinking of applying for this role (I'd really like to work for GW in some capacity in Nottingham), and tbh the yes-man and fall-guy stuff is putting me off a bit. I really thought this would be a role to bring real vision and ambition to improve GW sales and turn things around, using feedback from customers and data to inform a strong sales policy that shows consideration for hobbyists whilst improving GW's numbers. Maybe that isn't possible.

If you are thinking of working for GW, I suggest you read this (http://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Games-Workshop-Reviews-E11822.htm) and draw your own conclusions.

Vazalaar
04-06-2014, 22:03
I did see one position where there was a requirement for some IT knowledge.

In their defence, they do state that they would train people who they think have 'potential'. Some roles (like logistics and IT I imagine), may well only attract people with those skills already. They don't rule out skills as important. Anyone can be a yes-man, but if one candidate has 20 years of experience and another 0, I'd guess that the one with experience would have the edge (if both were yes-men). Apologies for the stereotype, but it wouldn't surprise me if people in the Hobby are over-represented in IT fields.

Thanks for posting your opinions everyone, I was thinking of applying for this role (I'd really like to work for GW in some capacity in Nottingham), and tbh the yes-man and fall-guy stuff is putting me off a bit. I really thought this would be a role to bring real vision and ambition to improve GW sales and turn things around, using feedback from customers and data to inform a strong sales policy that shows consideration for hobbyists whilst improving GW's numbers. Maybe that isn't possible.

If you want to work for GW, apply. Never, but never you should be influenced what people post here. You should apply, maybe do the interview and than decide.

rwphillipsstl
04-06-2014, 22:30
Those reviews seem to stress the sales manager side of things. Working in Nottingham might be better. If they are "clubby" versus "professional" then working AT the club itself would be a different experience than just working for the company generally.

Verm1s
04-06-2014, 23:58
Never, but never you should be influenced what people post here.

I agree.

Don't listen to Tonny.

Vazalaar
05-06-2014, 08:19
I agree.

Don't listen to Tonny.

Damn, Touché. ;)

jack da greenskin
05-06-2014, 12:21
This summer I'm doing my final year exams and should be going to uni in september.

I'm going to make the most nauseous, butt licking, yes man letter possible, and see if I can bag an interview. Any stock phrases they'll be sure to appreciate? Calling gamers "Games Workshop Hobbyists" (Possibly with a tm) is sure to go a long way.

MiyamatoMusashi
05-06-2014, 12:29
Damn, Touché. ;)

:)

In all seriousness though, deciding who to work for is a really important decision, but there is very little correlation between "a company that makes cool stuff" and "a company that is good to work for". That's the same for wargames, videogames, movies, comic books and magazines, to my sure and certain knowledge. Of course, if you can work somewhere that makes cool stuff and offers good employment terms, then that's the ideal, but just because a company does one thing, doesn't mean it does the other. In that context, researching what current- and ex-employees say about the place is entirely sensible (what do ex-GW-employees say about GW?), and indeed what the company itself says about itself (for me, that advert says a lot...).

So in my view, "if you want to work somewhere, apply, go for the interview, then decide" is terrible advice that will likely end up wasting a lot of time. "If you think you might want to work there, carefully research what the company is like, to see if you're being blinded by the cool end product regardless of what employment there would actually be like" is much sounder.

Vazalaar
05-06-2014, 13:09
:)

In all seriousness though, deciding who to work for is a really important decision, but there is very little correlation between "a company that makes cool stuff" and "a company that is good to work for". That's the same for wargames, videogames, movies, comic books and magazines, to my sure and certain knowledge. Of course, if you can work somewhere that makes cool stuff and offers good employment terms, then that's the ideal, but just because a company does one thing, doesn't mean it does the other. In that context, researching what current- and ex-employees say about the place is entirely sensible (what do ex-GW-employees say about GW?), and indeed what the company itself says about itself (for me, that advert says a lot...).

So in my view, "if you want to work somewhere, apply, go for the interview, then decide" is terrible advice that will likely end up wasting a lot of time. "If you think you might want to work there, carefully research what the company is like, to see if you're being blinded by the cool end product regardless of what employment there would actually be like" is much sounder.

Why is it terrible advice? It's not because you apply that you wil get the job. Most people do need to do multiple interviews/job applications before they succeed in finding a job.
I also don't think this forum or another forum is a great place to ask information about any company you want to work for. You never know that what is written here is the truth. So imo the best way if you are interested in working for GW is that you should try to get to the interview phase and see what kind of contract they are going to give you and than when you know the contract/working conditions you can decide.

MiyamatoMusashi
05-06-2014, 13:50
Why is it terrible advice? It's not because you apply that you wil get the job. Most people do need to do multiple interviews/job applications before they succeed in finding a job.

It's a waste of time for all concerned going to an interview that you don't expect there to be a reasonable chance you'll take the job if it's offered (pending the right to change your mind depending on what happens in the interview, of course). As you say, there could be multiple stages, it's going to take up quite a lot of your time and potentially money if you have to travel, interviewing is stressful... you're doing yourself a disservice if you don't do the research ahead of time. "I like game X, therefore I want to work for company Y" is a total disconnect because what are company Y like to work for? That's the important thing - if you like game X, play game X, you don't need to work for company Y to do it. Working for and company - company Y or otherwise - is first and foremost a matter of employment, which involves things like getting paid, not just what games they make - you can't eat plastic toy soldiers, nor pay the rent with them. (Clue: how much does this job pay? Even as a ballpark? A rough guide? A broad range of pay band? No idea, they don't even see fit to mention it in the job ad - they expect people to apply anyway and be grateful for whatever they get offered).

Reinholt
05-06-2014, 13:52
Why is it terrible advice? It's not because you apply that you wil get the job. Most people do need to do multiple interviews/job applications before they succeed in finding a job.
I also don't think this forum or another forum is a great place to ask information about any company you want to work for. You never know that what is written here is the truth. So imo the best way if you are interested in working for GW is that you should try to get to the interview phase and see what kind of contract they are going to give you and than when you know the contract/working conditions you can decide.

A few thoughts:

1 - I disagree with one on general principle. Most of the best jobs come from a single interview/application because you already knew it was a go before you applied. This usually takes networking and connections, but unless the job you want is entry level or perpetually low-level, application spam is usually the wrong method.

2 - I agree this forum is not a good place to ask for advice on employment at GW...

3 - Instead you should look at what people who have actually worked at GW have to say (which is, you know, why I linked to Glassdoor, and there might be something you can glean from a place like LinkedIn as well), and go pay attention to both the general perception of the company by customers and by employees.

Knowledge is always power.

ColShaw
05-06-2014, 14:27
Well, I have worked for GW (Seattle area, Redshirt, 2004-05, so quite some time ago now). I've also read several of the Glassdoor reviews. I won't say anything that's hearsay, I'll just talk briefly about my own experience.

The Good:
-My immediate manager was a very solid guy, very enthusiastic, supportive, and positive. Working with him taught me a lot of things which have helped me later on.
-Great bunch of guys I worked with. All very keen on the hobby, good workers, pleasant people.
-I got to paint models, run games, be a hobby consultant. A lot of the job was a lot of fun.

The Bad:
-It was a lot like working as a commissioned salesman--except that I didn't get paid commissions. There was relentless pressure to always upsell; I often felt like a slightly-sleazy used-car salesman.
-We were quite heavily understaffed and overworked, especially over the holiday season.
-Middle management were not helpful, understanding, or... well, gosh. They were basically jerks. When I talked to my old manager the year after I was "resigned" (more on that below), the first thing he said was, "I've got good news. We got rid of *name of his immediate boss*." And it WAS good news.
-There was basically no chance to move up, nor even stability in the current position. Turnover was horrendous. Remember that great bunch of guys I was talking about above? All but one of them got sacked, myself included, within a span of about 6 weeks.

My boss actually wept when he was ordered to let me go. I was an excellent employee, except that I wasn't generating instantaneous sales. Since I didn't fit into the upselling culture, I was deemed a poor fit for the company and cut loose. There was no concern whatsoever about making long-term hobbyists; there was a deliberate and explicit focus on short-term profits.

The job was a good experience for me. I was just out of school, still a very shy young man, scarce more than a boy, and being forced to interact with apathetic or even hostile people in a mall-store environment taught me a lot about self-confidence. The discount was nice--when I could afford any hobby supplies! (I was making $8.50 an hour and trying to support my fiancee as well, as she did a year of volunteer service) One thing I also found, however, was that my love for the hobby started to disintegrate after a few months there. When your hobby is your job, it can either lead you to love your job, or to dislike your hobby. It can certainly go either way.

It was actually a relief when I no longer worked there. I wasn't a disgruntled employee; I kept going to game nights there, I have no issue whatsoever with my old manager (I even based one of the heroes in one of my novels on him), but it wasn't a good place to work.

Coldhatred
06-06-2014, 02:56
Well, I have worked for GW (Seattle area, Redshirt, 2004-05, so quite some time ago now). I've also read several of the Glassdoor reviews. I won't say anything that's hearsay, I'll just talk briefly about my own experience.

The Good:
-My immediate manager was a very solid guy, very enthusiastic, supportive, and positive. Working with him taught me a lot of things which have helped me later on.
-Great bunch of guys I worked with. All very keen on the hobby, good workers, pleasant people.
-I got to paint models, run games, be a hobby consultant. A lot of the job was a lot of fun.

The Bad:
-It was a lot like working as a commissioned salesman--except that I didn't get paid commissions. There was relentless pressure to always upsell; I often felt like a slightly-sleazy used-car salesman.
-We were quite heavily understaffed and overworked, especially over the holiday season.
-Middle management were not helpful, understanding, or... well, gosh. They were basically jerks. When I talked to my old manager the year after I was "resigned" (more on that below), the first thing he said was, "I've got good news. We got rid of *name of his immediate boss*." And it WAS good news.
-There was basically no chance to move up, nor even stability in the current position. Turnover was horrendous. Remember that great bunch of guys I was talking about above? All but one of them got sacked, myself included, within a span of about 6 weeks.

My boss actually wept when he was ordered to let me go. I was an excellent employee, except that I wasn't generating instantaneous sales. Since I didn't fit into the upselling culture, I was deemed a poor fit for the company and cut loose. There was no concern whatsoever about making long-term hobbyists; there was a deliberate and explicit focus on short-term profits.

The job was a good experience for me. I was just out of school, still a very shy young man, scarce more than a boy, and being forced to interact with apathetic or even hostile people in a mall-store environment taught me a lot about self-confidence. The discount was nice--when I could afford any hobby supplies! (I was making $8.50 an hour and trying to support my fiancee as well, as she did a year of volunteer service) One thing I also found, however, was that my love for the hobby started to disintegrate after a few months there. When your hobby is your job, it can either lead you to love your job, or to dislike your hobby. It can certainly go either way.

It was actually a relief when I no longer worked there. I wasn't a disgruntled employee; I kept going to game nights there, I have no issue whatsoever with my old manager (I even based one of the heroes in one of my novels on him), but it wasn't a good place to work.

My experience, spot on, except as a Store Manager and more recently. If you want to work in a company where LITERALLY everyone is scared to lose their jobs, thus no significant action is taken on any issue then apply, jack da greenskin. I may be bitter about still being unemployed, but that doesn't make what I, or any other previous employees, say any less true if you take the time to look clearly.