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Greyfox-ex
27-06-2014, 02:24
Ok,

im very new to model making and want a good set of tool, now I'm aware this citadel toolkit is a ripoff at £90 (esp when its a few £ cheaper if bought in seprate.)

but as I'm new I want a good tool kit , with clippers that sheet, and decent files , its being bought for me as a present for someone I did a LOT of counter work for and the person doesn't exactly have money worrys so the cost of it doesn't really bother me.

but I want sonething that I know is good so if my stuff doesn't turn out that well I know its me not cheap tools, but as we all know expensive doesn't mean good.

Like citadel primer and games workshop (not citadel) shop branded brushes, from what I'm told are shocking products.

so in short are these tool good has anyone used them? As I said the cost is irelevent in this case as the person getting it for me isn't short on money and would hate it more if I have them a massive list of stuff knowing them lol

if it isn't any good does any one know of another toolkit set that's better?

any advice would be great

many many thanks

R.D.
27-06-2014, 02:53
The new clippers from what I've seen are definitely a good improvement, but I'm very hesitant about the price.

About what alternatives there are, well it depends where you are and what's available.

Greyfox-ex
27-06-2014, 03:03
Well I'm in the uk, so I can't really order from the us, as the import charges are insane.

as I said cost is NOT an issue ( for once ) as a friend is getting them for me for fixing his company server and saving him £1200+ on an engineer as its what I do for a living.

i just don't know expensive doesn't mean good.

yeah I've read the clippers "sheer" instead of "snip" so it greatly lowers the loose part pinging off over the other side of the room and taking someone's eye out, as well as them being thin and point not snub ended.

i just wish I wasn't such a noob I don't know if I'm looking at good stuff I have no idea what makes a good tool yet :(

Sanai
27-06-2014, 04:22
I have the clippers and the drill, and have found that both are pretty good.

The clippers have just the right amount of tension in them to feel good when clipping things, and they cut things pretty cleanly. The shearing effect of the clippers definitely works, as I have not had any bits of plastic flying across the room to get lost in the carpet so far while using them.

The drill I have found to be a vast improvement over the old citadel drill, as it is much easier to change bits and operate, and comes with a variety of different sized drill bits, unlike the old citadel drill which only had one size.

The only real problem with the citadel tools is price, and as you said, that isn't an issue for you.

Citadel brushes are really awful, but their tools are fairly decent.

Fangschrecken
27-06-2014, 04:23
Go to a nearby hardware store and look for some electrical clippers. Or try and find the kind they use for cutting track on model railroads. Those are stupendous.

I may have gotten lucky. I inherited a pair of really nice clippers from my great-granddad. No idea where he got them or what he used them for, but they cut GW plastic damn well.

jtrowell
27-06-2014, 07:54
Search in the forum archive, when the new tools were released there was a thread explaining how they were (all ?) rebranded tools from a well know manufacturer.

In other words, yes they are supposed to be good, or at least decent, but you can get the exact same quality for much cheaper going directly to the original manufacturer range.

Greyfox-ex
27-06-2014, 10:03
Ohhhh rebranded ,sneaky citadel although I'm not sure why that suprises me lol

thanks for the infomation that exactly what I need to know that essentially they are decent tool, despite the money, although I will go and check out this rebranding thing.

then its just the brushes to worry about and find a good brand.

many thanks to each of you each of your replies were all really helpful

Verm1s
27-06-2014, 10:29
Don't know too much about the GW clippers, but if it's shearing in general you're worried about, I've used a pair of xuron shears for years with few issues.

I had a look at the GW tools in person, and gave a few a quick test. Most of them seem okay, nothing particularly untoward, though the only one I bought was the mould line remover. (apart from the price, I'm set for the others; and it might be an overpriced gadget but it's a useful overpriced gadget) The files have an extremely fine grain, which looks like (as others have said) they're for filing plastic smoothly. You might want something a bit coarser if you ever pick up metal minis from another company.

The only new GW tools I wouldn't recommend, due to quality, are the sculpting tools. The last couple of generations suffered from great, thick, rough edges, which isn't much good when you're trying to sculpt fine, smooth details onto your wee, likkle 28mm miniatures. The latest set has smoother edges, but they're still quite thick. It'd be like trying to sculpt with an ice lolly stick. Pity, because I was interested in how they'd switched to a wax #5/zahle shape. (a particular type of dental wax carver, highly considered among some mini sculptors)
You might be only a beginner now, but if you ever want to start sculpting little bits of putty on conversions, or even full sculpts, I'd recommend getting a decent wax carver or two. You can regularly get dental-quality carvers on ebay for quite cheap prices, around £3-4. There are a few different, useful shapes, IMO: mainly the zahle (http://falconmedical.eu/img/0b5a0838_large.jpg), lecron (http://falconmedical.eu/img/6a07a265_large.jpg) (the old GW sculpting tool shape), or vehe (http://www.sklarcorp.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/l/4/l49-1320.jpg).
You can also get sets of non-dental-quality wax carvers for bargain prices, but IMO the quality can be variable, and some of the big 12-packs you might see are bulked out with a bunch of similar-looking probes. Not a big help, especially as you'd probably gravitate towards one or two favourite carvers anyway. And AFAIK none have zahles! ;)

Greyfox-ex
27-06-2014, 10:32
Ohhhh really , ok so the sculpting set is a waste of time, ok well while sculpting is prob out if my ability right now but I would def like to start practicing , so yeah ill do as you suggested and pick up some of those dental ones then, lol @ painting with a lolly stick.

as I def like the idea of doing some conversions.
I also still have to look out for a magnifiginy eye, vice and tweezers and paint gun as well and look at what brushes I wana get its a minefield , then the last job is to look at
Lighting , anyone use the daylight bulbs ?

thanks for your reply its good to know from someone that actually used the set !

Anyone else thing of any other things I might need when starting out? I wana give myself the best chance possible.

Bloodknight
27-06-2014, 10:39
Don't know too much about the GW clippers, but if it's shearing in general you're worried about, I've used a pair of xuron shears for years with few issues.

The new clippers are Xuron shears, IIRC. Unless they want to get into a trademark fight with Xuron, of course. (They advertise them as Micro-Shears, which is a Xuron TM).

Verm1s
27-06-2014, 10:40
Search in the forum archive, when the new tools were released there was a thread explaining how they were (all ?) rebranded tools from a well know manufacturer.


Ohhhh rebranded ,sneaky citadel although I'm not sure why that suprises me lol

Not that it makes much difference, and far be it from me to defend GW's mark-ups, but I'm not sure that sounds entirely fair. Made for GW by some top manufacturer, maybe, but not exactly knuck from them with a 'citadel' logo over the serial numbers. For one thing, was it ever obvious, or even determined, which 'well known' manufacturer was involved by the look of the new brown chevron look?

Edit: fair enough about the xuron thing. Still a wee bit skeptical, tho. :)

Edit edit:

lol @ painting with a lolly stick.

The daft thing is, with a bit of judicious carving, sanding and smoothing, a lolly stick would probably be a decent makeshift sculpting tool, and put it a step ahead of GW...


I also still have to look out for a magnifiginy eye

Speaking just for myself, I've found plain good lighting to be a bit more useful for sorting out fiddly details. Maybe I needed more practise, but the magnifiers I tried mucked about with my depth perception and magnified my tools, fingers and movements too. Nevertheless, I know folks who swear by optivisors and swing-arm magnifying lamps, so I won't put you off them. I'll just warn that they can be a subjective experience.


tweezers

Straight for general use, curved needle-nose for picking up very tiny things!


and paint gun as well and look at what brushes I wana get

Much less experience with these, but I recently got a wee Aztec A270 airbrush that does me for now. I have the same opinion about citadel brushes, although they're only starting to irritate me now, and I'm thinking about all those Winsor & Newton and Rosemary sable recommendations that get bandied about.


Lighting , anyone use the daylight bulbs?

I've got an 11w fluorescent tube in my lamp that isn't too far off, and used some incandescent daylight bulbs back when they were legal. Apart from cutting out the yellow tinge when painting, the brighter light helps you get a better look at smaller details, as mentioned.


Anyone else thing of any other things I might need when starting out? I wana give myself the best chance possible.

Non-GW glue? Even pound shop superglue is usually better than GW's, and I've always used Humbrol poly cement, from before I ever heard of Games Workshop.

Greyfox-ex
27-06-2014, 13:27
@verm1s

thank you so so much for such a detailed reply that's more than I could ever hope for (I look if there's a way to give rep points on this site.

really thank you, I've decided to go ahead with these new offical tool ,brushes I'm just guna get a wide varity and see what works well, as I too have heard a lot about Windsor and Newton brushes browsing old forum pages.

as for the other advice thank you I was a lol worried about my depth perscription with it so I'm going to try and borrow one first or see if the art shop will let me have a go with it first.

all you guys and your painting skills have put me in awe I just really hope I get even a little as good over time.

thanks again for all your advice.

@bloodknight sweet thanks for the name I gotta go check this out and take a look for myself , they def do advertise them as custom made for them so I'll be interested in looking this up to take a look.

Sigh I really also wish I hadn't always been a sucker for brand name stuff I've always been the same lol

Moralein
27-06-2014, 15:54
I've tried magnifying loupes (very expensive, high quality ones at that!), but couldn't get on with them. I do use them for work and tried them first for my painting rather than experimenting on patients. They do strange things to your depth perception and whilst you do get used to that, it's easier to use your eyes whilst you're still learning the basics. If nothing else using magnification just shows you where how bad your initial attempts are and that can be very disheartening.

Similarly whilst I now use Windsor and Newton brushes, they are expensive (very good brushes though), I started with cheaper sable one from art shops. I've tried various makes including GW and whilst others may disagree, I think while you're learning it's not worth paying out for the top of the line brushes. Have a look in your local art shop and just look for a range of sable brushes that keep their point. Initially you'll abuse whatever you buy and use too much paint, but it's a learning process and practice will give you great results in the end.

For lighting, I prefer natural daylight when I paint. I've tried daylight bulbs and desk lamps but find the shadows are too harsh and the contrast too marked when you're painting.

BFalcon
27-06-2014, 16:49
Best tool for painting minis and the like is an old GW pot, some bluetack and a good desklamp over your offhand shoulder. Attaching the mini to the top of the pot allows you to keep your hands clear and a firm grip as well as boosting the height.

If your eyesight is poor, a large magnifier with an all-round light might be a wise investment, but I would strongly recommend not using it for painting, but for studying the mini before painting a colour, to plan what you're going to do, since it also screws up your depth perception (I've been told - I'm a mono, so...).

lanrak
27-06-2014, 18:12
Hi folks.
I found this realy good in depth review on B.o.W.

http://tomschadleminiatures.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/games-workshop-has-recently-advertised.html

Verm1s
27-06-2014, 18:28
@verm1s

thank you so so much for such a detailed reply that's more than I could ever hope for

No probs. I can rabbit on about about sculpting tools at least (and come back to me when you want to decide on a sculpting putty ;) ) but for other things, especially the airbrushes and paintbrushes, you'll want to hear a few other opinions. Like Moralein's here.


I do use them for work and tried them first for my painting rather than experimenting on patients.

Is there an ombudsman or something we should phone? :eek:


I think while you're learning it's not worth paying out for the top of the line brushes. Have a look in your local art shop and just look for a range of sable brushes that keep their point. Initially you'll abuse whatever you buy and use too much paint, but it's a learning process and practice will give you great results in the end.

Yarp.


(I've been told - I'm a mono, so...)

I'm more shortsighted in one eye meself, so depth gives me occasional problems, but my stomach still starts to roll after a while staring through a lens. :)

Moralein
27-06-2014, 19:14
Is there an ombudsman or something we should phone? :eek:



There are times it's useful to be anonymous on the internet :)

Inquisitor Kallus
27-06-2014, 19:37
Hi folks.
I found this realy good in depth review on B.o.W.

http://tomschadleminiatures.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/games-workshop-has-recently-advertised.html

His 'review' (in no way is it a review Lanrak, he never even used the citadel tools....) is flawed.
Two things I know straight away.
1.A Mold line removal tool doesn't 'dull' like a knife blade edge. It is substantially thicker and unlike a blade edge it is not used for cutting, ONLY removal of flash. I have seen a number of these tools online and they work well and as far as I am aware dont need replacing...
2. There is a huge range in quality of files (also known as 'Swiss' or 'needle' files). I have used everything from poor quality to the jewellers quality grade and this is a massive difference in the results you get from each. These look like jewellers quality grade ones to me, the ones from Amazon are definitely not. Again, this 'reviewer' of yours who doesn't even state that he has used the tools he has listed is merely putting forward options.

'Here is a car it will get you from A to B, here is another, it will do the same. It is a lot cheaper, but its got a blown tyre, the suspension is shot so the ride wont be smooth, no air con, and does about 1 mile to the gallon....'

In no way shape or form is this a review Lanrak. It shows cheaper tools, thats cool, but again there may be a marked difference in quality, work results, durability, life span and so on. If someone does a real review, you know, one in which the tools are actually used then thats fine, just don't try and mislead people.

It is quite apparent that tools can be found cheaply elsewhere, indeed quality can vary, you may even get things as good as or better than the GW tools for a similar or lower price. Ive used all kinds of different tols throughout the years and have also bought GW ones too. On the whole they've been pretty good quality, not the best but good, and if ive had a problem with any ive been able to get a refund or have them replaced.

The new GW tools look of a high quality, but I havent used them so can't comment on how ergonomically sound,good at their job and durable they are. They are still quite pricey, but, if they last longer aand are of good quality etc you may save yourself some money in the long run. If you want to try them out I imagine you could robably get a trial at your local GW. Give them a call and see if its ok. You could try that or get some cheaper tools, really up to you at the end of the day

Greyfox-ex
27-06-2014, 19:57
His 'review' (in no way is it a review Lanrak, he never even used the citadel tools....) is flawed.
Two things I know straight away.
1.A Mold line removal tool doesn't 'dull' like a knife blade edge. It is substantially thicker and unlike a blade edge it is not used for cutting, ONLY removal of flash. I have seen a number of these tools online and they work well and as far as I am aware dont need replacing...
2. There is a huge range in quality of files (also known as 'Swiss' or 'needle' files). I have used everything from poor quality to the jewellers quality grade and this is a massive difference in the results you get from each. These look like jewellers quality grade ones to me, the ones from Amazon are definitely not. Again, this 'reviewer' of yours who doesn't even state that he has used the tools he has listed is merely putting forward options.......

i agree with post totally ,oddly enuff that link telling ppl not to waste there money on the new offical tools was what made me come and ask you guys for a proper response, the Alt's he showed for the items you are getting expect maybe the drill are massively inferior I have tried the new tools in the shop and they feel good, I have used many of those cheaper ones admitily not with mini model making but I've found them ok but more general purpose.

@ianrsk, as I said thankfully the price isn't an issue on this one occasion as I'm not laying for it lol. But I app' you showing me the link I might not have seen but I did of loads of reserch before coming here, but warseer and bolter & chainsword alwYs seem to have the best people for info.

@verm1s many thanks again for taking the time to give me so much detail.

and everyone really I know you must have a lot of new players asking silly questions all the time and it must get tiring so I do really app' all your help.

i really do try to find a response via google before asking anything tho ,as a lot of things I wonder about I find without having to ask,thanks for being so welcoming to a new hobbyist like you have been.



going to look forward to painting bids once I've got good at these marines too.


and I should prob consider learning how to play the game at some point ,as at the moment I'm just a fluff builder

@moralein I took your advice and went and bought 8 cheap but well pointed sable brushes to go along side my more expensive ones as your advice seemed really good.

i dont plan on painting from the pot lol but its true I have no idea what to thin the paint down with , I've heard thinners can really affect pigment , flow corrector I've read can keep old paints alive and helps keep a good thinning without pigment degradation, or I guess there's good ol fashioned water, 2:1 paint to water ratio maybe?

ivd been watching a lot of painting guides so fingers crossed in a month when I've got starterd I'll be sure to post my first attempts , I'm sure it will be very funny for you all as they will prob look awful lol, as I've seen many of you guys posts of your minis and they look amazing , but do done told me it doesn't matter how bad you are at the start as long as you get better each time, eventually you'll be an expert. So basically stick with it and don't get disheartened

BFalcon
27-06-2014, 20:32
I'm more shortsighted in one eye meself, so depth gives me occasional problems, but my stomach still starts to roll after a while staring through a lens. :)

Ah, another who has to carefully move the brush along the line of sight to where you want it until the bristles bend slightly then? :P

Glad I'm not the only one...

Coldhatred
27-06-2014, 22:43
i dont plan on painting from the pot lol but its true I have no idea what to thin the paint down with , I've heard thinners can really affect pigment , flow corrector I've read can keep old paints alive and helps keep a good thinning without pigment degradation, or I guess there's good ol fashioned water, 2:1 paint to water ratio maybe?

I wouldn't consider myself a pro painter by any means, I'm average at best, but I'll tell you that I pour a small amount of paint onto my palette and then just dip my brush in my water and use it to thin the paint on the palette. I'd say it's pretty close to a 2:1 all said and done, but YMMV. Hope my vague advice helps.

Bloodknight
27-06-2014, 22:54
I'm more shortsighted in one eye meself, so depth gives me occasional problems, but my stomach still starts to roll after a while staring through a lens.

Ditto. I have (corrected) 3% eyesight in one eye and 100 in the other. Can't see 3d for **** and needed a special approval by an opthalmologist to get a driver's licence (as soon as I had that, I played Pokemon with those, the only one I haven't got is for 8+ ton trucks and buses because it was too expensive), but after trying a magnifying glass once I decided against ever doing it again.

Litcheur
29-06-2014, 15:22
I also still have to look out for a magnifiginy eye, vice and tweezers and paint gun as well and look at what brushes I wana get its a minefield , then the last job is to look at
Lighting , anyone use the daylight bulbs ?
In my not-so-humble opinion.

About fancy stuff :
Most of this stuff can be found in electronic stores (that's also one of my hobbies).

Daylight bulbs : I used to have one. They're nice, but I tend to prefer fluorescent bulbs : less powerful, but they won't heat.

Magnifying lens : useless. Or maybe it's my eyes.

Third hand : not really useful, I've used mine one or twice to glue metal minis, but that's all.

Tweezers : not that useful, unless you're doing delicate surgery on a kit you've kitbashed. Don't know why, but I prefer crossed ones.

Hand drill : useful if you want to drill your barrels/exausts and work with plastics/resin only. Just forget about drilling holes to reinforce a metal mini with this kind of tool. I use an electric drill that was designed for electronics, and use a model train transformer to regulate the speed so it can turn veeeery slowly. Works great with plastic, metal and printed board. :D

Clippers : any will do. Shearing clippers may be slightly more convenient, and GW's current clippers will work really well on plastics, but I wouldn't trust them on metal minis.

Paint gun : totally worthless. Airbrushes are nice tools, but it's a technique in its own, and paintguns are just useless.

X-Acto : I only use them when my Olfa blades won't do the job. Which is quite rare. A regular cardboard cutter with Olfa blades will be safer, less expensive and usually cut better, because you're only one snap away from having a fresh tip.


About regular stuff :

Palette : do yourself a favor, make your own wet palette.

Water pots : one for clean water, one for dirty water. I use glass yoghurt pots.

Paints : Citadel are fine. I prefer Prince August/Vallejo, but to each one his own. They're less expensive, the range is wider, I find the eyedropper bottle to be much more convenient, and the metallics are just great. Alcohol-based ones are FANTASTIC.

Glues: Citade ones are ovepriced, and not that good.You can basically buy any PVA glue in a hardware store, they're pretty much all the same. Cyano glues can be found everywhere, they're mostly all the same too. Plastic glues are best found in modelling stores, my favorite is the Revell one with the needle tip. Surgical precision.
(tip : if the needle is clogged, just heat it up slightly with a lighter)

Brushes : Your most important tool. Citadel ones are overpriced, and GW sellers frown upon seeing you take all of their brushes to handpick the best ones. Frak them. You want to select your brush and have one with a good tip. Brick & Mortar art shops are a good place to find your brushes. RaphaŽl and Windsor & Newton are good brands. You'll need lots of crappy brushes, though, to spread PVA glue, to dry/wet brush, even to lay your base colors. For that kind of tasks, any brush will do. Yup, that's right, you don't need that 5/0 siberian albinos sable brush for your base color. Tiny brushes are a pain in the back, they're fragile and cannot hold much water. Stay away from them, you don't actually need these x/0 at all, except for very specific tasks.

Freehands on 6mm minis wouldn't even qualify as a specific task. :o
http://image.noelshack.com/fichiers/2014/26/1404054610-brush.jpg

I used this brush to paint these minis. It's not a part of a challenge or something. That brush just has a great tip, can hold three to four gallons of water and is tougher than a Leman Russ. As you can see from the writings (or what's left), it's not a brand new one. It's a size 3 squirrell brush, it looks huge but it works great and can do everything.

Vazalaar
29-06-2014, 15:43
In my not-so-humble opinion.

About fancy stuff :
Most of this stuff can be found in electronic stores (that's also one of my hobbies).

Daylight bulbs : I used to have one. They're nice, but I tend to prefer fluorescent bulbs : less powerful, but they won't heat.

Magnifying lens : useless. Or maybe it's my eyes.

Third hand : not really useful, I've used mine one or twice to glue metal minis, but that's all.

Tweezers : not that useful, unless you're doing delicate surgery on a kit you've kitbashed. Don't know why, but I prefer crossed ones.

Hand drill : useful if you want to drill your barrels/exausts and work with plastics/resin only. Just forget about drilling holes to reinforce a metal mini with this kind of tool. I use an electric drill that was designed for electronics, and use a model train transformer to regulate the speed so it can turn veeeery slowly. Works great with plastic, metal and printed board. :D

Clippers : any will do. Shearing clippers may be slightly more convenient, and GW's current clippers will work really well on plastics, but I wouldn't trust them on metal minis.

Paint gun : totally worthless. Airbrushes are nice tools, but it's a technique in its own, and paintguns are just useless.

X-Acto : I only use them when my Olfa blades won't do the job. Which is quite rare. A regular cardboard cutter with Olfa blades will be safer, less expensive and usually cut better, because you're only one snap away from having a fresh tip.


About regular stuff :

Palette : do yourself a favor, make your own wet palette.

Water pots : one for clean water, one for dirty water. I use glass yoghurt pots.

Paints : Citadel are fine. I prefer Prince August/Vallejo, but to each one his own. They're less expensive, the range is wider, I find the eyedropper bottle to be much more convenient, and the metallics are just great. Alcohol-based ones are FANTASTIC.

Glues: Citade ones are ovepriced, and not that good.You can basically buy any PVA glue in a hardware store, they're pretty much all the same. Cyano glues can be found everywhere, they're mostly all the same too. Plastic glues are best found in modelling stores, my favorite is the Revell one with the needle tip. Surgical precision.
(tip : if the needle is clogged, just heat it up slightly with a lighter)

Brushes : Your most important tool. Citadel ones are overpriced, and GW sellers frown upon seeing you take all of their brushes to handpick the best ones. Frak them. You want to select your brush and have one with a good tip. Brick & Mortar art shops are a good place to find your brushes. RaphaŽl and Windsor & Newton are good brands. You'll need lots of crappy brushes, though, to spread PVA glue, to dry/wet brush, even to lay your base colors. For that kind of tasks, any brush will do. Yup, that's right, you don't need that 5/0 siberian albinos sable brush for your base color. Tiny brushes are a pain in the back, they're fragile and cannot hold much water. Stay away from them, you don't actually need these x/0 at all, except for very specific tasks.

Freehands on 6mm minis wouldn't even qualify as a specific task. :o
http://image.noelshack.com/fichiers/2014/26/1404054610-brush.jpg

I used this brush to paint these minis. It's not a part of a challenge or something. That brush just has a great tip, can hold three to four gallons of water and is tougher than a Leman Russ. As you can see from the writings (or what's left), it's not a brand new one. It's a size 3 squirrell brush, it looks huge but it works great and can do everything.

Great post!

BFalcon
29-06-2014, 18:59
Water pots : one for clean water, one for dirty water. I use glass yoghurt pots.


Great post Litcheur.

One thing I'd add here, if possible, use 3 pots - one for metallics - you don't want the metallic flakes floating in water you'll be using to wash out brushes you use for non-metallics and try to keep a brush or two purely for metallics too. You should be OK without doing this, but it never hurts. And, if you decide to get some of those Vallejo alcohol-based metallics, don't forget the brush cleaner and conditioner - they last a while and might save your brush.

Oh and clippers: If, like me, you go around the sprue and decimate it first before carefully holding the item you want and then removing the mould sprue from it, get yourself some cheapest-possible wire cutters for the first part - I usually go around the sprue and cut the sprue well away from the part, usually where the sprue splits off to meet the parts. I actually have three - the older GW red-handled set with the snub nose for tougher precision work, a £1 Blackspur set I use for the rough work and the last-gen needle-nose GW ones (with the grey handle) which I like for the precision work (and I use those only on plastics and then on removing the last pieces of the sprue from the part because they can get in where the others can't).

GrandmasterWang
03-07-2014, 06:00
The gw new clippers and mold line remover are of great quality. I strongly recommend them both. Imo these are the 2 nest tools GW sells. For sculpting I use dental tools, never used the gw ones.

I wouldn't recommend the GW glue but the clippers and mold line remover are quality and will last a lifetime.

Their undercoat sprays are good quality but I haven't heard (havent used personally) anything good about their air gun. GW brushes are decent. I rate their wash and dry brush as better than most. For detail etc brushes I prefer other hobby store options

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

Zingraff
03-07-2014, 08:50
I'd like to add my experiences with the Citadel tools range. I haven't purchased the tool set, but I've purchased a few of them individually.

Cutters: I'm reasonably happy with the cutters. I've previously been using cutters which look a lot like the Xuron cutters and I find that the Citadel cutters are more comfortable to work with as the Citadel cutters have a nice weight and shape which fits into my hand.

Needle files: I really like the Citadel needle files. They're not as good as a Swiss needle file set would be, but decidedly better than most files marketed as "needle files" nowadays.

Sculpting tools: Other reviewers haven't been enthusiastic about the sculpting tools, and they may be right, but if you're only looking for tools to aid you when you're filling gaps with greenstuff, then the Citadel sculpting tools are all right.

Pin vice: I haven't tried the new pin vice, but you will need one. I think my pin vice was packaged as a Citadel tool when I purchased it ages ago. It's still good.

Knife: I haven't tried the new knife either, but it's actually a re-packaged Swann-Morton scalpel and I have one of those. Swann-Morton is amongst the best makers of surgical blades in the world, so this is easily a very good knife and nothing like the knives GW used to sell. This Tom Schadle guy compared the Swann-Morton scalpel with some sort of X-acto copy, so he clearly doesn't know what he's talking about. I should stress that a scalpel generally isn't a good model building tool, because it's too sharp and flimsy. It doesn't cut through thick materials, like cardboard and plasticard and it's often easy to cut away too much, due to the blade being too sharp. What the scalpel excel at, is removing hard to access mould lines and other fine detail jobs.

I'd say that overall, the Citadel tool set is a reasonably good deal. Maybe it's a bit expensive but this is GW and you should be used to that by now.

Mounting your miniatures temporarily on old paint pots while you paint them, is a good idea. I've been using wine corks for a long time now, you can buy bags of new unused corks from big supermarkets and home brewing supplies shops. Corks will usually fit snugly inside the round GW infantry bases.

As for tweezers, I use mine all the time to remove fibres that get stuck in the wet paint. I believe those fibres come from either my clothing or the paper towels I use, as theyíre too fine to be hairs.