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.Torch.
21-10-2014, 16:23
Afternoon all,

I'm writing this in some brief down time before I'm drawn back to a lovely pile of thermodynamics revision for next month.

I was pondering today how people find time to paint/build/play when life gets busy. I'm currently studying a Marine Engineering cadetship with the RFA and this, if you are not aware, takes up a huge portion of my time.

My questions are simple: I've never had a fully painted army, how do people who work in maritime or the armed forces manage to balance hobby with work? A large amount of my free time is spent socialising, as it's almost impossible to see people in the day. The rest is spent revising. I don't want to ditch the hobby all off my best friends at home play, the problem is I don't see them enough or have enough time to build an army.

I've been pondering a commission if anyone has any good UK based recommendations? But I'd much rather paint it myself as I find it one of the more enjoyable aspects of the hobby.

Sorry for the whine, it's just what's been on my mind this week.

Torch

.Torch.
21-10-2014, 16:24
Sorry, dual posted off my tablet as I thought the first one failed

soullessginger
21-10-2014, 16:45
I'm in the Army and I do most of my painting in the evening whilst the TV is on in the background.

When I was a Lt I would do a bit after work before going to the mess for a couple of beers (drunk painting is a BAD idea).

I've known people who take projects with them on tour as you have no family to see, see your friends all day and can't but beer and there is only so much grot you can watch.

It is all about time management and prioritising, sometimes it's my hobby and sometimes it's my xbox, sometimes it's a beer.

Skidman
21-10-2014, 17:50
While I am not in the armed forces I do my work as a sous chef in the States and regularly work 12-14 hours a day. I agree with soulessginger it is all in how you prioritize what you want for your free time mine is usually split between spending time with my fiance, my hobbies, or going and grabbing a beer or 10. At the end of the day it is your hobby if you are still interested in it and can find the time it will all work itself out. You just have to decide if it is what YOU want

austen powers
21-10-2014, 18:53
Being in the army helps massively,I'm away from home a lot,so the hobby take my mind off being away from loved ones,I'm on exercise ATM and I've brought my army to paint...

Still Standing
21-10-2014, 19:07
Finish work, do half an hours hobby stuff. Also "A large amount of my free time is spent socialising" is long speak for "I'm a pisshead".

.Torch.
21-10-2014, 19:59
Somehow I feel I might be taking half a company of marines with me to Sea!
I guess its just the workload of the academic phase thats got me down a bit.
Cheers guys!

Sir Didymus
21-10-2014, 20:01
Vow never to put an unpainted model on the table, spend your game time painting untill you're ready, and play smaller games.

Still Standing
21-10-2014, 20:14
Somehow I feel I might be taking half a company of marines with me to Sea!
I guess its just the workload of the academic phase thats got me down a bit.
Cheers guys!

I took an army to Afghanistan and did quite a bit of work. Don't underestimate those half hour painting sessions.

Dr.Clock
21-10-2014, 20:36
It really is all about scheduling. While I've never been in any armed service, I spent a few years abroad studying and teaching in China. During these periods of relative isolation, I was only able to carry a few minis, but after the first couple months of adjustment to find my 'groove', I ended up painting very regularly - 1-2 hours a day, 4-5 days a week. This meant that by the time I came home, I had models painted to a higher standard than ever, as I hadn't had access to the 'distractions' of the rest of my collection.

From experience, I know that 'revising' as you Brits call it is really mentally draining. I found that spending an hour to decompress and paint while listening to an e-book or podcast would actually help me get distance from intense research and writing. While it might SEEM like they're similar activities, the focus on physical painting and detail was actually refreshing to the mind. The mind needs rest like any part of the body... at a certain point, you gotta stow the revisions, and pick up a paint brush.

This isn't to say that I didn't spend significant time 'socializing'... just that painting was a good way to alleviate a bit of that weekly grind. I'm sure you can likely find a few hours a week at the minimum.

Cheers,

The Good Doctor.

.Torch.
21-10-2014, 23:24
Just for reference, I started my Tau army in March 2012, and I've only got a Riptide, 8 drones and 2 Broadsides to paint...

Anyone got any experience painting on a moving ship? ;)
I suppose for the most part it'll be stable....

Althenian Armourlost
21-10-2014, 23:44
Just for reference, I started my Tau army in March 2012, and I've only got a Riptide, 8 drones and 2 Broadsides to paint...

Anyone got any experience painting on a moving ship? ;)
I suppose for the most part it'll be stable....


I work 12 hour days, work out every day, play classical guitar as well as painting almost 10,000 points of Eldar in a year. It's easy - No computer games and no TV. You'd be amazed how productive you become when you quit these two. I'm still out twice a week, too.

Borchsenius
22-10-2014, 02:30
Im a dual officer on a merchant ship, and I do all my painting out here. I've never painted as many dolls as I do now.

Chem-Dog
22-10-2014, 02:43
From experience, I know that 'revising' as you Brits call it is really mentally draining. I found that spending an hour to decompress and paint while listening to an e-book or podcast would actually help me get distance from intense research and writing. While it might SEEM like they're similar activities, the focus on physical painting and detail was actually refreshing to the mind. The mind needs rest like any part of the body... at a certain point, you gotta stow the revisions, and pick up a paint brush.

Absolute truth. For me anyway, assembling and painting minis is a relaxation method. You work different areas of the brain and I find it help process other information as my mind leaves the hands and eyes to their amusement and decides to have a bit of a tidy up, so it may even help you revise.

muggs
22-10-2014, 11:18
I'm a doctor, so long hours and frequent exams too.

I've never managed to complete an army either. My situation is slightly complicated as I tend to do my modelling when I go back to my parents and take finished squads home to paint. This is due to mine and my brothers shared collection and bitz box being there. My fiancé isn't too keen on having our flat covered in boxes of sprues etc whereas my parents are quite used to it!

I think the 'socialising' may be the reason I don't finish too much. None of my friends are into 40k, it's only really something I do with my brothers.


Sent from my Styges Mk XV Dataslate using Tapatalk

Alex_H
22-10-2014, 13:00
I had my first Child in January and started a new job in March, and to be truthful I simply have no free time these days to really spend on the hobby. I know this will change once my daughter is older, but currently everything revolves around her (as it should be) and catching up on sleep. (No matter what, my daughter thinks 5:30AM is a good time to get up and start the day and therefore parents should be up and entertaining me!)

Also, tip bit of wisdom to anyone thinking of having children. You will have NO MONEY to spend on the hobby - unless your stupidly rich. I now find myself spending the £50 a month I might have spent of White Dwarfs, paints glue etc, on toys that will encourage my daughter to crawl/walk, or new socks for ones she has lost whilst out and about, or shoes the nursery demands so that she can "go outside" even though she can't crawl yet, let alone stand unsupported. And don't even get me started on Nursery fees.......

T10
22-10-2014, 13:59
Putting on my Captain Obvious costume for a moment, I think there's a case to be made for "Get it done!" For most kinds of armies you can get away with murder, figuratively, by first applying the base primary color on the whole army and then go back and fix the details.

Here's what I've been guilty of, and got away with :)

Paint on sprue: Simply paint the pieces on the sprue before snipping them off. In fact, if you have a pigment-rich base color you can even consider skipping the priming stage and paint straight onto the plastic. Either way, this approach lets you quickly paint every part of the mini, even those spots that are going to be hard to reach after assembly (e.g. the part of the chest behind a weapon).

I recommend applying two or three thin layers for a uniformly smooth result. Also, if you have pieces that are going to have distinct base colors (e.g. green Ork arms/faces, yellow torsos and black legs), make the distinction early and use the appropriate base paint. :)

You can also consider shading and highlighting the pieces before you cut them off the sprue, but from experience this can create a problem down the road, because...

Mold lines: Leave these for later. As long as you make the contact surfaces fit together (you need to make sure those arms stick to the body piece!) you can deal with the mold lines you can actually see once the model is fully assembled. Unfortunately, this will involve scraping off some of that paint you applied earlier, so expect to go back and re-paint. This is simpler and less time consuming if you haven't already done shading/high-lights.

Leave bases black: Unless you have a sure-fire way to texture bases and then placing the (basic) painted model on it, you can defer basing to a later date.

Ok, so this sounds like a lot of work. But this is assembly-line painting: The overhead of getting set up and started is the same for painitng a single squad or ten, but the process of applying brush to plastic is really quick as you sacrifice detail for bulk. What you get out of it is a fully painted army you can use immediately, but it still needs followup for detail.

I'm not a very dedicated painter, so for the longest while I've had a space marine army with its basic color scheme in place. Then I spent an afternoon doing shoulder-pads, another doing faces, bases and so on. And suddenly, a heap of mini's just exploded into the done! category. I'm still working on the army, with a huge back-log of almost done, but every afternoon I spend of it gives results.

-T10

Denny
22-10-2014, 14:25
Vow never to put an unpainted model on the table, spend your game time painting untill you're ready, and play smaller games.

This.
Also paint a little but often. An hour a day adds up.

Spiney Norman
22-10-2014, 15:09
A slightly different, but related question, does anyone else suffer with feeling intimidated or overwhelmed by the size/magnitude of painting some minis, like when a model is especially large, or significant or both?

I've been painting up a tesseract vault for the last 8 months but the whole thing just seems too daunting. I've half-done a few bits to it, the T.Ctan, the insectoid thing that sits above it and I've even started the laborious job of painting the inner surface of the pyramid, but very often I get sidetracked on to other projects I know I can finish quickly and see a result from and then come back to the vault a month or so later only to paint a little more before I get disillusioned with lack of progress again.

Rabbitden
22-10-2014, 15:13
As a father of 2 (2yr old and 11wk old) there is very little time for painting let alone the 3-4hrs needed for a game. I find it best to set aside 1 evening a week where there are 'no jobs allowed' - No washing, no shopping, no tidying. And once the kiddiwinks are tucked up in bed (usually by 7:30pm) I can get a few hours of painting done. Sure it's only once a week but these few hours of 'hobby time' really help. It does need a bit of planning though, for example, I will always ake sure the last 'layer' of paint to go on a model is a wash so it can be dry by the time you next pick u a brush. There is nothing worse than spending my precious little bit of hobby time first applying a wash and then waiting an hour for it to dry before adding a new colour. Schedule in a few hours a week as dedicated hobby time and the chores can wait till the next evening.

Denny
22-10-2014, 15:42
A slightly different, but related question, does anyone else suffer with feeling intimidated or overwhelmed by the size/magnitude of painting some minis, like when a model is especially large, or significant or both?

Yeah I do, especially when I'm just doing the basecoat/washes and the model just looks awful for ages no matter what I do.
But I find if I keep going they'll come a point where the model suddenly starts to look not far off being finished (even if, in reality, the details will still take ages) and I find my motivation comes flooding back.