PDA

View Full Version : Storing 'warhammer'



Alex_H
29-12-2014, 22:34
Due to a growing family my hobby has been displaced to the external garage. Now I didn't really worry about any possible long term damage with it being stored out of the house until I awoke to see the garage roof covered in frost this morning, and entering and find it almost below zero inside.

Should I rethink how things are stored. Could things get damaged by the damp cold temperatures? Books, magazines, painted models?

Does anyone else have experience storing their hobby in a garage? Anyone loose anything this way?

Voss
30-12-2014, 02:38
Not sure on painted models, but books and magazines? Short answer is yes, it is a problem.

Longer answer is also yes, but more complicated. For print materials what you want most is stability. Cool and low humidity are optimal, but the worst thing to have is a place where temperature and/or humidity (and the humidity is the more important of the two) fluctuate a lot (and a garage is often just behind an attic as the worst possible place). Upwards of about 20 degrees (thats Fahrenheit, not Celsius, so feel free to convert that number into something sane) and 25% change in humidity, and the fibers are going to expand and contract and significantly shorten the lifespan of the materials. Cardboard boxes are also a poor choice of storage medium unless you know absolutely (i.e., they say so, or you test them) they're acid free.

Now, admittedly, over the course of a couple months, this isn't the worst thing ever. But long term damage will occur, and it is accumulative. As long as it stays cool and damp, unless water gets into things, there isn't an immediate danger, but when spring rolls around, and temperature and humidity start changing independently, and then on into summer, fall and back into winter, thats when you'll run into real problems with long term damage.

Given your geographical location and climate, and my own background as an archivist... I'd say it is very much less than ideal.

Generalizing, most things like stability and cool, low humidity*. Actually if you have an old refrigerator or freezer, even if it isn't on, it will isolate materials from the outside environment to a fair degree and significantly lessen the impact. Though you should check it first, a shoddy one that isn't fairly air tight won't do any good.

*though most paper types tend to be fine in high heat and almost no humidity, as long as it is consistent. Just... don't store old film this way. Unless you're a pyromaniac, because some of the materials used for capturing images were really volatile. 'Safety film' being one of the worst.

ExquisiteMonkey
30-12-2014, 02:40
I have similar concerns about being displaced to the garage as the family grows larger, but being in Australia, its at the opposite end of the temperature spectrum.

Many are the tales of plastic/resin models being left in cars on moderately hot days and melting as a result. My garage is easily the hottest room in the house on these type of days....

Avatar_exADV
30-12-2014, 02:55
True, but cars routinely reach temperatures that the interior of your garage won't, simply because of the solar heating involved. If you're in a hot environment, and you've got to store stuff in an area that's not climate-controlled, definitely try to keep it close to the floor and away from the attic.

Scaryscarymushroom
30-12-2014, 05:07
Due to a growing family my hobby has been displaced to the external garage. Now I didn't really worry about any possible long term damage with it being stored out of the house until I awoke to see the garage roof covered in frost this morning, and entering and find it almost below zero inside.

Should I rethink how things are stored. Could things get damaged by the damp cold temperatures? Books, magazines, painted models?

Does anyone else have experience storing their hobby in a garage? Anyone loose anything this way?

I kept all my models and books in a garage for a month before we moved house. I had no problem with the books (it was during the summer), but I am going to suggest that if you store things in the garage, you should expect other people to handle them -- and they probably won't be handled carefully. People at my old house would turn the garage over looking for any number of things, and I expect that's fairly normal.

If you're going to leave your models in the garage at all, then make sure the container clearly says what they are, and that they're fragile. Make sure they're in foam or something.

Gerod253
30-12-2014, 05:59
Agreed on the foam. Hard containers are best. Most figures should be fine enough if sealed inside their containers well enough to prevent moisture from seeping through the cracks. Books, try and store those inside if you can.Paper is far more sensitive to temperature, moisture, mold, and many legged critters then most plastics and paints. Good luck with your storage.

Commissar Vaughn
30-12-2014, 14:21
The only adverse effect Ive noticed on miniatures stored in cold environments is that it can make PVA glue turn white, so if youve used that in the decorating of bases or construction of scenery it might look a bit wierd. Does clear up though as it gets warmer again....

Kaptajn_Congoboy
01-01-2015, 12:19
Cold in, in general, good for long term storage of both paper and plastics. Dampness is not. Frost on the models or magazines could be a disaster. The magazines will likely be more vulnerable than the paint job on your models. Isolate them well and keep them in the dark and all should be well. Note that "isolate" does not mean completely shrink-wrapping the boxes if you store them in a damp environment. The risk of creating a damp microclimate is too great. So if you put them in hard plastic boxes your should inspect them for condensation after wet spells.

stroller
01-01-2015, 14:21
It depends. I kept my stuff in an external garage for years in mid UK. I kept paper indoors, and models, boards and scenery in the garage. Over time one of the plywood boards warped - took somewhere between 3 - 5 years. Figures were in tool boxes GW & other cases and never suffered. That said, I'm a gamer not a keep for ever collector - my brother, for example, stores his comics in individual plastic open topped bags. I don't expect my stiff to last for ever, but some of his stuff, stored in a leaking garage - has suffered mould, damp, warping and some has had to be thrown out.

Keep it dry and things are a lot simpler. Keeping models in a hard plastic case, in foam, will also insulate to a degree.

lorelorn
10-01-2015, 04:03
As mentioned, it is dampness rather than temperature that you need to watch out for. Your miniatures should be fine, paper based products including card components will suffer.

Bloodknight
10-01-2015, 12:50
The miniatures are unlikely to take damage, but from my own experience (I had to store my stuff after moving a lot), do not ever put anything made out of cardboard or paper in the garage. Your collection will suffer unless you have access to completely air- and watertight boxes.

mrtn
10-01-2015, 22:39
If you want to break up a superglue bond you put your minis in the freezer. If you've used superglue I wouldn't store my models in a place that could freeze.

Tyron
11-01-2015, 04:41
What about putting them in the loft? The heat from the house rises into the loft and should help with the books.

You could always just keep the books in the house and models in the loft/garage just in case.

Alex_H
13-01-2015, 20:14
Well I've moved the books and magazines indoors, now just need to find room for the board games

The Black Shield
13-01-2015, 21:05
Make sure to keep your paints and glues in a stable environment in the the house also I would be more worried about heat with miniatures than the cold.

Bloodknight
13-01-2015, 22:37
Yeah, and take a look at your paints every 6 months or so. I stored mine for 3 years and a lot of them went kaput over that period although I stored them on the head.