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Dean5150
28-01-2015, 18:11
Sounds interesting and yet another potential series of books to get?

DarkChaplain
28-01-2015, 19:15
Now at the new and improved price of only 27,50€! What a bargain.

I expected the release closer to march or april, considering the Amazon pages for it. Looks like BL is trying to release even earlier via their own site, to make a premium.

MiyamatoMusashi
28-01-2015, 22:20
What an intensely patronising way to announce this.

"Your new favourite Space Marine Chapter!"

"All action, all the time."

"The Dark Hunters don’t have all the gear, but you’ll admire their mad ambush skills."

"Mad ambush skills"? Is their target audience nine-year-olds? My new favourite Chapter? ORLY?

Anyway. Much as I am loathe to pre-judge anything :angel: I'm expecting a 20 hardback novel from a brand-new author backed by patronising hype is going to turn out much like it did in similar previous cases... it seems like the authors they make the most noise about tend to be pretty dreadful, while in many cases the ones that are actually genuinely good slip by unnoticed, and often slip away entirely. Maybe I'll be wrong, if it gets good reviews I may give it a go, but their track record doesn't exactly have me leaping to open my wallet on pre-order.

To put it another way: even ignoring the obvious big hitters like ADB/Abnett, I'd happily buy the next Guy Haley or Peter Fehervari novel sight unseen (albeit that 20 is still a lot to ask unless it's a major release), because they've earned that faith with the novels they've published already. (At least Haley is still writing for them. Not heard anything from Fehervari since the sublime Fire Caste). So why do the expensive hardbacks with accompanying frothing mailshots come from... well... writers that don't justify it?

Dean5150
28-01-2015, 22:22
Here it be!

http://www.blacklibrary.com/Images/Product/DefaultBL/xlarge/Umbra-Sumus-(Royal)-UK.jpg

and an e-short as well.

Fen
29-01-2015, 00:41
Anyway. Much as I am loathe to pre-judge anything :angel: I'm expecting a 20 hardback novel from a brand-new author...
Actually,he isn't exactly a "completly new" author

He had a Dark Hunters story ,that i'm kind of betting will somehow link to this one,in Legends of the Space Marines and at least another one in a WHFB collection.So,he started the same way most of the more "recent" BL authors i can think of have (since you name him,wasn't Fehervari first BL story in Heroes of the space marine?)

BTW,i liked that story.Time will tell about the quality of this one

DarkChaplain
29-01-2015, 07:16
What an intensely patronising way to announce this.

"Your new favourite Space Marine Chapter!"

"All action, all the time."

"The Dark Hunters don’t have all the gear, but you’ll admire their mad ambush skills."

"Mad ambush skills"? Is their target audience nine-year-olds? My new favourite Chapter? ORLY?

Anyway. Much as I am loathe to pre-judge anything :angel: I'm expecting a 20 hardback novel from a brand-new author backed by patronising hype is going to turn out much like it did in similar previous cases... it seems like the authors they make the most noise about tend to be pretty dreadful, while in many cases the ones that are actually genuinely good slip by unnoticed, and often slip away entirely. Maybe I'll be wrong, if it gets good reviews I may give it a go, but their track record doesn't exactly have me leaping to open my wallet on pre-order.

To put it another way: even ignoring the obvious big hitters like ADB/Abnett, I'd happily buy the next Guy Haley or Peter Fehervari novel sight unseen (albeit that 20 is still a lot to ask unless it's a major release), because they've earned that faith with the novels they've published already. (At least Haley is still writing for them. Not heard anything from Fehervari since the sublime Fire Caste). So why do the expensive hardbacks with accompanying frothing mailshots come from... well... writers that don't justify it?

I was thinking "like Peter Fehervari" way before you actually named him. I'm still hoping he's getting another release. The man really impressed me with Fire Caste.
Good news regarding Haley, though: There should be two original novels by him released in 2015, outside of Black Library. There'll be plenty of Haley, one way or another.

I'm still waiting for End Times short stories, though. There's so much room to fill between the novels and beyond..... They really don't hype Fantasy enough, even despite all the renewed interest it gets.

MiyamatoMusashi
29-01-2015, 07:41
Actually,he isn't exactly a "completly new" author

He had a Dark Hunters story ,that i'm kind of betting will somehow link to this one,in Legends of the Space Marines and at least another one in a WHFB collection.

Then I stand corrected and beg his pardon. Not "completely new". I don't recall it, which suggests it was neither effusively brilliant nor terrifyingly awful... hence one is still left to wonder whence came the hype and expensive hardback?


Good news regarding Haley, though: There should be two original novels by him released in 2015, outside of Black Library. There'll be plenty of Haley, one way or another.

Yes, I've read one of his non-BL novels and really enjoyed it, I'll be looking out for more from him. BL do seem to have realised he's good (he's getting lots of things published by them - Skarsnik was incredible - and they've put him on HH as well), it just seems strange to me who they choose to hype up (I'll refrain from naming names) and who they don't.

Darke
29-01-2015, 11:56
Paul Kearney is one of the best fantasy writers currently writing. He's never been a break out commercial hit, but his fantasy books are extremely well respected in the field. If fantasy is your thing, check out A Different Kingdom, as well as his Monarchies of God series, which have been recently re-issued in a two volume omnibus. In fact, Solaris Press has re-issued almost all of his books recently. His Macht fantasy series was also excellent military fantasy.

jareddm3
30-01-2015, 14:43
Paul Kearney is one of the best fantasy writers currently writing. He's never been a break out commercial hit, but his fantasy books are extremely well respected in the field. If fantasy is your thing, check out A Different Kingdom, as well as his Monarchies of God series, which have been recently re-issued in a two volume omnibus. In fact, Solaris Press has re-issued almost all of his books recently. His Macht fantasy series was also excellent military fantasy.
Completely agree. Kearney may be relatively new to 40k but he's an experienced author with a lot of publications under his belt. I'm feeling optimistic about it.

Also speaking of Peter Fehervari, if you haven't read his short story A Crown of Thorns, I can't recommend it enough.

Nickolas94
01-02-2015, 10:10
Paul Kearney is relatively new to 40k but The Last Detail (Legends of the Space Marines) is an awesome short story :D

Nazguire
01-02-2015, 19:32
Read the excerpt - seemed pretty good. Didn't scream out 'AVOID, AVOID, AVOID' which I'll admit I kinda half-expect with most of BL releases nowadays :(

Fen
02-02-2015, 14:51
206915
new short on BL site

DarkChaplain
06-02-2015, 14:54
It looks like the book, and monday's eShort, were pulled from Black Library's store. The blogposts about the book and the author were also removed.

Looks like **** hit the fan.

Darke
06-02-2015, 15:15
The paper books were likely printed and the audio book recorded. Hell, there are probably palletts sitting in the warehouses of the hardcover ready to ship right now. It must be a serious rights dispute for this to happen.

MiyamatoMusashi
06-02-2015, 15:40
How very odd.

dram
06-02-2015, 19:13
It must be a serious rights dispute for this to happen.
What could the rights dispute be about?

ElGigante
07-02-2015, 15:39
What could the rights dispute be about?
No idea. The last time I remember anything this drastic was when a WD writer decided to cut and paste chunks of a Terry Brooks novel as fluff for his articles about elves.

DarkChaplain
07-02-2015, 16:02
The Last Detail standalone was also removed from the store.

Why are you all thinking it must be some rights dispute/plagiarism case? I doubt Kearney, an established, popular Fantasy author, would ruin his career with something like that.
It wouldn't surprise me at all if it was more like a personal disagreement between him and Black Library, or a contractual problem that popped up.

ElGigante
07-02-2015, 17:05
The Last Detail standalone was also removed from the store.

Why are you all thinking it must be some rights dispute/plagiarism case? I doubt Kearney, an established, popular Fantasy author, would ruin his career with something like that.
It wouldn't surprise me at all if it was more like a personal disagreement between him and Black Library, or a contractual problem that popped up.

I wasn't. Just remembering the last time I'd heard of GW pulling something quickly. Its a bit late in the day for contract disagreements though, when the item was actually sold for a while. Could be a problem with the eBook itself, a file corruption or something?

reds8n
07-02-2015, 17:41
No idea. The last time I remember anything this drastic was when a WD writer decided to cut and paste chunks of a Terry Brooks novel as fluff for his articles about elves.


First I've heard about this, can you elaborate please ?

DarkChaplain
07-02-2015, 17:55
Could be a problem with the eBook itself, a file corruption or something?

Ebooks aren't rocket science. A corrupt file is easily replaced. Pulling an ebook from 2011(!) and one from last monday means that there's something bigger happening.

MiyamatoMusashi
07-02-2015, 22:12
Overheard someone talking to the BL guys at the HH Weekender today. Apparently there's another series of books called the "Dark Hunters" series, means nothing to me but I'm sure Google will reveal all if you are interested. The expression the BL guy used was "oops" and I got the impression that it will be available again once they've resolved the problem (presumably, renamed the Chapter).

dram
07-02-2015, 23:10
From Wiki:

Dark-Hunter is a paranormal romance series by Sherrilyn Kenyon.
Couldn't they just remove Dark Hunters from the title of the book?

Fen
08-02-2015, 02:52
From Wiki:

Couldn't they just remove Dark Hunters from the title of the book?
Sounds like the most sensible option (renaming the chapter might be a problem since they are also showcased in the latest space marine codex,unless they start editing that too)

That also means "burning" all the hardbacks they had ready printed *ouch*

shadowhawk2008
08-02-2015, 03:12
Uh... Dark Hunters: Umbra Sumus and Dark-Hunter... I'm sure there's a big difference between the two titles.

DarkChaplain
08-02-2015, 04:16
Especially considering one is a paranormal romance series while the other is a science fiction novel. There's zero reason to think that somebody would confuse the two. Nevermind that the romance thing is "Dark-Hunter", not "Dark Hunters". Two extremely generic words to begin with.

The Dark Hunters Chapter has been part of the lore since at least the 5th edition Codex for Space Marines, according to Lexicanum sources, most likely much longer. They won't be renamed. They also had one of them in the Damocles anthology, Hunter's Snare by Josh Reynolds, which even has an audiobook. They won't change the chapter name.

Avian
08-02-2015, 07:59
Presumably they wanted to avoid another 'Spots the Space Marine' incident.

MiyamatoMusashi
08-02-2015, 08:03
Surely if it was just a case of removing the Chapter name from the title of the novel, the older e-shorts wouldn't also have disappeared from the store? None of them had Dark Hunters in the title AFAIK.

But I don't really know, just surmising based on what the BL guy said.

ElGigante
08-02-2015, 09:30
First I've heard about this, can you elaborate please ?

It was way back in the nineties, would have been 1997 or 1998. The UK WD was running a series of articles about various staff armies and there inspiration, pretty much an expanded version of 'Stillmania'. And one writer who's name escapes me included some bookending fluff that didn't quite fit Warhammer. And then it was revealed the reason why was because he'd lifted it from a Shannara book by Terry Brooks word for word. GW had to recall and pulp all the remaining copies on sale and the writer was fired.

reds8n
08-02-2015, 11:10
..hmm..

Ta for the info.

Gonna file that one under urban myth, for now anyway.

Thanks though !

7788
08-02-2015, 14:57
Uh... Dark Hunters: Umbra Sumus and Dark-Hunter... I'm sure there's a big difference between the two titles.

Yes, though copyright statutes can be (perhaps intentionally) hard to decipher. Anyway I can't believe BL did not check for something like this before going ahead. So I tend to agree with what's been said about this not being a copyright dispute.

Darke
20-11-2015, 11:30
Any updates on if this book is ever going to be re-released?

bound for glory
20-11-2015, 14:05
Actually,he isn't exactly a "completly new" author

He had a Dark Hunters story ,that i'm kind of betting will somehow link to this one,in Legends of the Space Marines and at least another one in a WHFB collection.So,he started the same way most of the more "recent" BL authors i can think of have (since you name him,wasn't Fehervari first BL story in Heroes of the space marine?)

BTW,i liked that story.Time will tell about the quality of this one

thats the story of the "left behind" marine that the boy and his father help? that was a good story.

shadowhawk2008
21-11-2015, 06:31
thats the story of the "left behind" marine that the boy and his father help? that was a good story.

Yes it is. Decent enough story, IIRC.

Fen
22-11-2015, 00:10
Any updates on if this book is ever going to be re-released?
Nothing that i know of

Darke
22-11-2015, 13:10
There were multiple news stories that all the printed books were pulped. Too bad:

http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/ireland/News/article1545913.ece

bound for glory
22-11-2015, 15:05
wow. looks like granny got a taste of her own medicine.

dram
22-11-2015, 22:57
There were multiple news stories that all the printed books were pulped. Too bad:

http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/ireland/News/article1545913.ece

Paul Kearney, author of fantasy novel Dark Hunters: Umbra Sumus, said “thousands” of hardback books were pulped after UK publisher Black Library, a subsidiary of game and retail company Games Workshop, received a cease and desist order from attorneys for Sherrilyn Kenyon, an American author. Kenyon, who has sold more than 12m books as part of her Dark-Hunter series, objected to the book’s title.

So it was because of the title of the book.

DarkChaplain
23-11-2015, 04:07
What a completely petty and nonsensical situation... As if anybody could ever mix those two up. Nevermind that "Dark Hunter" is as generic a title as "Space Marine" or "Sword Fighter".

MarcusAurelius
23-11-2015, 12:06
so just change name and then print again?

kamedake88
23-11-2015, 21:15
Apparently Black Library is also involved in some sort of actual legal action involving the title as well and not just a simple cease and desist. Don't count on ever being able to read this book unless the author himself leaks the book in some form.

Freak Ona Leash
23-11-2015, 22:07
Ah well I suppose it might be a bit of karmic comeuppance on GW's part, but damn it I was looking forward to this one. The Dark Hunters seem cool, and Paul Kearney is supposedly a solid author and an absolutely huge 40k fan by all accounts.

Soul Hunter
26-11-2015, 23:05
So not only has the Deathwatch series been cancelled, but the odds of getting to read Dark Hunters is nil. Brilliant.

Black Library are really failing to impress in recent times.


SH

Freak Ona Leash
27-11-2015, 00:23
I suspect it has to do with Games Workshop's recent corporate policy of "let's never make any money again." But we have an entire forum dedicated to that.

It does make me wonder if some of the better authors, like ADB and Abnett, might end up ending their work with BL altogether. ADB is a massive 40k fan, but he's certainly skilled enough to succeed as an author of non-tie-in fiction. And Abnett obviously has other stuff to do. The sequels to Pariah have already been cancelled, which is a massive disappointment on it's own.

Darke
27-11-2015, 03:22
Lot of talk of books being cancelled with zero citations or sourcing. Can anyone back these claims up with reputable sources?

DarkChaplain
27-11-2015, 05:41
So not only has the Deathwatch series been cancelled, but the odds of getting to read Dark Hunters is nil. Brilliant.

Black Library are really failing to impress in recent times.


SH

The Deathwatch series was canceled? Where's that info coming from? Last I heard was that they'd accepted another new story for it recently.

Spellfire
28-11-2015, 10:51
I suspect it has to do with Games Workshop's recent corporate policy of "let's never make any money again." But we have an entire forum dedicated to that.

It does make me wonder if some of the better authors, like ADB and Abnett, might end up ending their work with BL altogether. ADB is a massive 40k fan, but he's certainly skilled enough to succeed as an author of non-tie-in fiction. And Abnett obviously has other stuff to do. The sequels to Pariah have already been cancelled, which is a massive disappointment on it's own.
Can you source the statement that the Pariah sequels have been cancelled? Regardless of how much it may cost to employ Abnett (compared to most of the other [mediocre] BL authors) surely anything from him is money in the bank?

Tim_Ward
04-12-2015, 23:06
Can you source the statement that the Pariah sequels have been cancelled? Regardless of how much it may cost to employ Abnett (compared to most of the other [mediocre] BL authors) surely anything from him is money in the bank?

They're not cancelled as of August this year (https://twitter.com/vincentabnett/status/636455208256733184).

It's worth remembering that it's "only" been three years since Pariah. Less prolific writers than Abnett frequently go this long without releasing anything at all. Neal Stephenson, for example, typically goes four years between novels. It took Robert Harris 6 years to get round to writing the last volume of his Cicero trilogy. Then there's George R. R. Martin.

This doesn't mean that it won't eventually be cancelled, though. Given the current state of the Black Library I think there's a good chance the place will simply fold before he gets around to writing the rest of the novels. Or there'll be some insane diktat from GW, like requiring all future Black Library novels to be nothing but the words "Space Marine" for 300 pages, then the URL for the GW online store. Or he'll be asked to write the screenplay for Guardians of the Galaxy 2, then be too busy attending Hollywood social events and mingling with the stars to do BL work. Or some political ******** will happen at Black Library and he'll want nothing more to do with the Games Workshop. Or they'll black list him for petty and trivial reasons.

Just saying, at the moment the intention still seems to be to release it at some point and that the passage of time since Pariah is not necessarily significant.

ADB's blog post that he was working on Master of Mankind and Dan's tweet confirming that he was still working for the Black Library and writing warmaster came around the same time: end of August. I like to imagine that this isn't a coincidence and that it was the result of the conclusion of whatever [internal ********] has been afflicting the BL recently, or the realization that their new business tactic of not publishing any books wasn't working as well as they'd expected. Probably a coincidence, though.

shadowhawk2008
05-12-2015, 16:17
You know how trilogies with BL work? Books in a particular series come out within 1 year of each other. Pariah going three years without a sequel, for a series that was so hyped at the time for what it promised, is just... weird.

HaSY
06-12-2015, 03:41
Thus, it will be long before we can get to read the awesomeness of Dark Hunters. If anything, the rumors of a leak from the novel (some claimed to get hold of that novel before BL stopped launching it) maybe untrue or BL is efficient in recovering those copies.

Tim_Ward
06-12-2015, 15:30
You know how trilogies with BL work? Books in a particular series come out within 1 year of each other.

I know how they used to work. I don't think it's worked that way for a goodly while now. Even with the original plans Penitent wasn't ever going to come out in 2013.


Pariah going three years without a sequel, for a series that was so hyped at the time for what it promised, is just... weird.

When you consider the publishing industry as a whole, it's the Black Library way of doing things that's weird. Most authors don't release a book every year. I mean, some do, but it's not the norm. You don't have to read very far between the lines to see that they've been having trouble getting authors to keep up with their schedule and maybe the issue is that their schedules are kinda unrealistic; not all writers can churn out (decent) novels at the rate someone like Asimov or Pratchett could.

I think they're kinda stuck in this weird place between being one of those pulpy publishers who churn out endless books with numbers on the side and being a semi-respectable* publisher with quality authors on board. And they decided that they wanted to have the quantity of the latter and the quality of the former. And probably pay the rates of the former, too, knowing how anything connected with Games Workshop tends to operate.

* say semi-respectable because they'll never be seen as "respectable" while publishing licensed fiction, irrespective of the actual quality of the work. Which is a shame, but what can you do?

DarkChaplain
06-12-2015, 17:33
The Ahriman trilogy released in less than a year between each installment. The Dark Angels: Legacy of Caliban trilogy had a longer gap between first and second novel, but that was down to Gav's schedule, and was never shelved. Yarrick is almost annually so far, as was the Archaon duology.

Pariah, Penitent and P3 are the odd one out. Same with The Warmaster. Its down to Abnett and BL not matching their schedules or paying enough to make it a priority project, I'd say.


And you'll find that most authors who actually write full time DO release a book a year, or more than that even. Look at Guy Haley's output, both in and out of BL. Look at Josh Reynolds writing his own stuff next to tie-in and pseudonym IPs. Look at Brian McClellan, Mark Lawrence, Michael J. Sullivan, Brandon Sanderson... there's rarely a Fantasy or Scifi trilogy coming out these days that isn't releasing one book a year. I believe David Annandale is working on his 5th novel of the year, too.

Thing is, Black Library is losing writers. Graham McNeill is jumping ship, Abnett has better offers, Swallow too. Others are disgruntled with how things going, too.
A good amount of BL authors COULD, DID and DO churn out decent novels at a high rate. Thing is, a lot of them do it for other publishers now, as BL changes for the worse.

Tim_Ward
06-12-2015, 18:41
Pariah, Penitent and P3 are the odd one out. Same with The Warmaster. Its down to Abnett and BL not matching their schedules or paying enough to make it a priority project, I'd say.

Oh, absolutely. Doesn't mean the rest of the trilogy will never be written though.

I mean, it might never be written for the reasons I said. But the long gap is not one of those reasons.


And you'll find that most authors who actually write full time DO release a book a year, or more than that even. Look at Guy Haley's output, both in and out of BL. Look at Josh Reynolds writing his own stuff next to tie-in and pseudonym IPs. Look at Brian McClellan, Mark Lawrence, Michael J. Sullivan, Brandon Sanderson... there's rarely a Fantasy or Scifi trilogy coming out these days that isn't releasing one book a year. I believe David Annandale is working on his 5th novel of the year, too.


Neal Stephenson (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neal_Stephenson#Bibliography) - one novel every 4 years
John le Carre (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_le_Carr%C3%A9#Bibliography) - one novel every 2 or 3 years
Hilary Mantel (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilary_Mantel#Novels) - approximate average of 3 years between books; goes as low as one and as high as seven
China Mieville (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Mi%C3%A9ville#Works) - between 1 and 2 years between novels
Bruce Sterling (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Sterling_bibliography) - between 1 and 3 years between novels
George RR Martin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_R._R._Martin) - between 1 and 5 years between novels at different points in his career.
Arthur C Clarke (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke_bibliography#Novels) - 1 to 3 years between books
William Gibson (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gibson) - 2 to 3 years between books
JK Rowling (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._K._Rowling#Harry_Potter_series) - the Harry Potter series slowed right down as it approached its conclusion
Tom Holland (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Holland_(author)#Novels) - mostly 3 years between books
Sarah Waters (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Waters) - usually about 3 years.
Chris Palliser (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Palliser) - anywhere between 1 and 5 between books
Molly Goss (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molly_Gloss) - notable for a record (for this list) 9 years between two of her books!
Robert Harris (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Harris_(novelist)#Bibliography) - 2 to 4 years between books
Neil Gaiman (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Gaiman_bibliography#Novels) - anywhere between 0 and 6 years

I could go on. In short; it depends on the author, it depends on what point in their career it is and it depends on what else they have going on.


Thing is, Black Library is losing writers. Graham McNeill is jumping ship, Abnett has better offers, Swallow too. Others are disgruntled with how things going, too.

As far as I know they're all still writing for Black Library, just not exclusively. Would you want to spend your entire career just writing about Warhammer and Warhammer 40k and nothing else? I don't doubt that whatever's going on internally at Black Library is a factor, but I think we'd be seeing authors who'd won recognition for their BL work branch out anyway.

shadowhawk2008
07-12-2015, 04:41
You are seriously using JK Rowling and Arthur C. Clarke and others to make a point?

I can give you names of tons of writers who push out books on a yearly schedule. Doesn't mean anything. BL has certain ways of doing things and in that particular context, when a high-profile series is indefinitely delayed and there are no explanations whatsoever, then there's a problem.

DarkChaplain
07-12-2015, 08:06
Naming authors like GRR Martin and Rowling as examples is really, really silly. Those high profile authors have so much money in their accounts, they don't write out of having to pay the bills anymore, but out of passion. Rowling, too, has been releasing an annual series for the past three years with the Cormoran Strike series published under the pen name of Robert Galbraith.

Most publishers these days will try to get trilogies out in yearly steps. When the paperback of the last hits, the next is out in hardback usually. Any larger gaps would waste marketing and evaporate interest in the series too quickly. High profile authors like Martin and Rowling can afford being out of this cycle, due to their names alone selling their works in excess - the first Galbraith novel sold reasonably well for a debut crime mystery novel, but when Rowling's name got attached, sales surged to the high heavens to the point of silliness.

You're just plain wrong if you believe annual releases are a rarity.

Darke
07-12-2015, 12:03
It really does depend on the author - Donna Tartt for example releases one book every 10 years or so (and for my money is the best writer currently living).

But yes, genre publishing does seem to have a quite accelerated schedule compared to "literary" fiction.

Tim_Ward
07-12-2015, 17:19
You are seriously using JK Rowling and Arthur C. Clarke and others to make a point?


Naming authors like GRR Martin and Rowling as examples is really, really silly. Those high profile authors have so much money in their accounts, they don't write out of having to pay the bills anymore, but out of passion. Rowling, too, has been releasing an annual series for the past three years with the Cormoran Strike series published under the pen name of Robert Galbraith.

You fellows are aware that I named 8 other authors on that list?


You're just plain wrong if you believe annual releases are a rarity.

And you're just plain wrong if you believe non-annual releases are a rarity. As I said, it depends on the author and it depends on their circumstances.


But yes, genre publishing does seem to have a quite accelerated schedule compared to "literary" fiction.

More like licensed fiction does. Most of the authors on that list are genre authors.

I think one difference is also that other publishers tend to do print runs of more than, say, 6 copies. A book by an author with reasonable name recognition should be making a small trickle of money more or less indefinitely, but Black Library went through this phase a few years ago where they just wouldn't sell anything more than a few years old except as an e-book. I wanted to start reading the Gaunt's Ghosts books a few years back but it turns out you couldn't get a copy of the first omnibus for love nor money, just a reprint of the first novel. So that was that. With all the reprints I'm seeing on their website at the moment it seems like they're coming round to this way of thinking.

Their website's awful too. Do you even taxonomies bro?

DarkChaplain
07-12-2015, 22:03
All of your example authors I recognize and/or checked are high profile with plenty of awards under their belts. Their royalties are far grander than those of the average author writing for a living. Many of them had a hit or two that would pay rent for years to come, and even licensed their IPs out for television and movies.

Comparing a Neil Gaiman or Rowling (who wrote Harry Potter annually before the books become too big (annual from 1-4, a three year gap until 5 and then every other year til 7), and has been releasing FOUR novels over the past four years), or authors who are working in journalism, or teaching at universities and write more on the side than anything, to professional authors who have to write to pay the bills rather than wait for the next payroll from HBO, is laughable.

You are pointing at the outliers who got smash hits that sold very, very well for them, and took off the pressure of having to write a lot. Not everybody can afford being a GRR Martin - and even fewer now than 20 or 30 years ago. The market has shifted drastically since a lot of your examples got started. Heck, a bunch of them were born in the 40s! They do not represent the average genre author of today. If anything, they are the elite who can afford to brood over their works for years before picking up a pen. That is a luxury that only a few authors have right now.
Yes, it very much depends on the authors' circumstances - and these examples that supposedly prove that the current norm isn't actually the norm at all, all wrote or write under exceptional circumstances.

Darke
07-12-2015, 23:40
I wonder how David Annandale finds time to teach while pumping out 4+ books a year plus a million shorts, novellas, etc. And most of them are pretty well written.

Tim_Ward
07-12-2015, 23:52
So, you're saying authors don't need to churn out books on a yearly basis if they've got a lot of other work (like, say, writing 9 gazillion comics) and some big successes under their belt (such as few NYT best sellers or having one of your comic series made into a major hollywood movie)?

Anyone know any Black Library authors like that?

MarcusAurelius
09-12-2015, 15:36
Apparently Black Library is also involved in some sort of actual legal action involving the title as well and not just a simple cease and desist. Don't count on ever being able to read this book unless the author himself leaks the book in some form.

Does this really prevent BL from replacing the phrase (the Dark Hunter title and all Dark Hunter references in the actual text) with something else and releasing the edited novel?

cswang
12-12-2015, 06:07
If it is in some kind of legal action, they most likely can't do anything with it until everything gets resolved.

Also, consider BL's current direction. This novel - from all accounts, a full-length novel, an original work featuring not directly tied in with some miniatures release, just doesn't jive with what they're doing. They could have just decided it wasn't worth the hassle, and re-release another HH anthology of three shorts that have been out for years with a new cover and charge $30 for it.