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View Full Version : Emplyment at GW (specifically the studio)



selfconstrukt
06-06-2015, 03:24
I haven't been on Warseer for a while, but thought this would be a good place to ask since GW apparently doesn't respond to questions like this.

Is GW only hiring digital sculptors these days? A friend of mine has applied a few times but just gets a generic "Sorry, not interested" message.

IMHO he's a pretty good sculptor, and he used to sculpt for Specialist Games and Forge World anyway, among other companies.

I think it's due to 2 reasons, one is he's in the USA and GW would have to move him over to the UK, the other is that (from what I've heard) GW has now gone 100% digital (including Forge World).

He has been learning digital work, on Rhino and ZBrush, but he's not comfortable with digital work yet to market it as a skill.

Can anyone shed some light on what GW might be looking for? They aren't very specific on the job description on what type of sculpting they are hiring for.

From what I've gathered most companies these days are using freelancers, very few have in-house sculptors.

ebbwar
06-06-2015, 09:09
No real idea, but the US thing sounds like a barrier. I think GW tends to have in-house sculptors for the most part rather than freelancers. The freelancer route is more for smaller companies that don't have the resources to keep people on the books all year round. If you look at the ramped up releases for GW, inhouse staff would make more sense as you can keep on throwing projects at them.

Has he applied to a vacancy each time or did he simply contact them to see if they'd be interested? If it was the second, then it could simply be that they have enough sculptors these days.

I just thought, GW like to parade how they hire people for the right attitude, rather than skills, knowledge and experience, so maybe he needs to forget talking about sculpting and talk about his 'right attitiude' instead. lol.

TheFang
06-06-2015, 11:19
If he's already worked for GW-Specialist and Forgeworld he must know someone at Forgeworld who could answer the question far better than any of us ever could.

Tyberos
06-06-2015, 12:22
To be honest, if it is the Citadel Miniatures Designer/Conceptualiser roles your friend is interested in my guess would be they are seeing that he's based in the United States and don't think he would be prepared to relocate to the UK. Disregarding Visa, or work permits, I doubt they're offering enough to make relocation worthwhile.

The thing is, Games Workshop are obviously very cagey about having their concept models being leaked too soon and have good internal processes to ensure pictures of them don't. It must work as we don't often see pictures until they're either shown off by Games Workshop themselves, or at best when someone snags an early copy of White Dwarf. If they were to allow someone on their design team to work remotely this would blow their processes for maintaining the secrecy of new releases right out of the air.

As already suggested, if you're friend insists the only method to make any headway at all, or at least get a better answer would be for him to get in touch with any colleague's still working there.

ebbwar
06-06-2015, 14:33
To be honest, if it is the Citadel Miniatures Designer/Conceptualiser roles your friend is interested in my guess would be they are seeing that he's based in the United States and don't think he would be prepared to relocate to the UK. Disregarding Visa, or work permits, I doubt they're offering enough to make relocation worthwhile.

The thing is, Games Workshop are obviously very cagey about having their concept models being leaked too soon and have good internal processes to ensure pictures of them don't. It must work as we don't often see pictures until they're either shown off by Games Workshop themselves, or at best when someone snags an early copy of White Dwarf. If they were to allow someone on their design team to work remotely this would blow their processes for maintaining the secrecy of new releases right out of the air.

As already suggested, if you're friend insists the only method to make any headway at all, or at least get a better answer would be for him to get in touch with any colleague's still working there.

Good point, using freelancers/remote workers would make it harder to keep the rumour lockdown going.

selfconstrukt
06-06-2015, 18:25
No real idea, but the US thing sounds like a barrier. I think GW tends to have in-house sculptors for the most part rather than freelancers. The freelancer route is more for smaller companies that don't have the resources to keep people on the books all year round. If you look at the ramped up releases for GW, inhouse staff would make more sense as you can keep on throwing projects at them.

Has he applied to a vacancy each time or did he simply contact them to see if they'd be interested? If it was the second, then it could simply be that they have enough sculptors these days.

I just thought, GW like to parade how they hire people for the right attitude, rather than skills, knowledge and experience, so maybe he needs to forget talking about sculpting and talk about his 'right attitiude' instead. lol.

He wasn't applying for a freelancer position, but the one GW advertised as in-house. I told him he should just up and move over there, then apply.



If he's already worked for GW-Specialist and Forgeworld he must know someone at Forgeworld who could answer the question far better than any of us ever could.

That was years ago, back around 2000-ish. He did e-mail FW asking them the same thing, but never got a reply.


As already suggested, if you're friend insists the only method to make any headway at all, or at least get a better answer would be for him to get in touch with any colleague's still working there.

He does know a couple people but not very well. I also I find this odd, he feels it would be "inappropriate" to ask and doesn't want to inconvenience them.

Unfortunately, these days, it seems the only way to get work anywhere is through cronyism.

Coldhatred
06-06-2015, 18:58
He wasn't applying for a freelancer position, but the one GW advertised as in-house. I told him he should just up and move over there, then apply.

Almost impossible without having a job going in. Not just financially, but in terms of immigration and customs.

selfconstrukt
06-06-2015, 23:15
Almost impossible without having a job going in. Not just financially, but in terms of immigration and customs.

I thought he could get around that since he does freelance sculpting for a number of other companies and has income, but after some web searching I realized it's really very difficult for Americans to come over to Europe to live and work without having a company sponsor them.

hobojebus
07-06-2015, 15:27
It wouldn't be a very long term thing if he did get a job they'll collapse in a few years at the rate they are going.

Tyberos
07-06-2015, 21:44
On a side note, perhaps your friend should consider the long term when looking at Games Workshop as an employer. I'm not referring to the chances of the company going under, but I am referring to the disposable attitude they have towards their lower tier employees outside the old boys clique at their HQ. There are many better employers out there, as a quick scan through Games Workshop's employer feedback on the Glassdoor website attests to.

abcz417
07-06-2015, 22:15
Don't know about GW but Forgeworld definitely still have sculptors who work by hand; though at the last Horus Heresy weekender, Tony said that everyone now did bits and pieces digitally (and some do it exclusively), so the trend is clear. Definitely wouldn't be surprised if GW was more digital...

selfconstrukt
08-06-2015, 18:21
Thanks for the feedback guys.

I know a few people that have experience in areas like moldmaking, casting, injection molding and sculpting.

Most of them used to work for GW in Baltimore or Memphis but these days they are all working at places like UPS, Starbucks, QFC etc.

Few companies are doing their own manufacturing these days, they are sending it all to China. The only larger company I know that does still do some in-house production is scaling it back since more of their product is being remade as plastic (in China).

It's a shame the laws regarding migrant workers is so strict, since AFAIK, a lot of the companies in Notts are still using in-house production.

The_Real_Chris
09-06-2015, 09:07
Thanks for the feedback guys.

I know a few people that have experience in areas like moldmaking, casting, injection molding and sculpting.

Most of them used to work for GW in Baltimore or Memphis but these days they are all working at places like UPS, Starbucks, QFC etc.

Starbucks has a model department?

Those guys should really sort themselves out and offer a model making service. A lot of people on the UK have done that. If they love it it can be a part time endeavour alongside regular jobs. You won't get rich but there are plenty of kickstarted a showing you can cover your costs.


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk

selfconstrukt
09-06-2015, 18:30
Starbucks has a model department?

Those guys should really sort themselves out and offer a model making service. A lot of people on the UK have done that. If they love it it can be a part time endeavour alongside regular jobs. You won't get rich but there are plenty of kickstarted a showing you can cover your costs.

Most of them have moved on and live in other states now, so they wouldn't be able to.

I know at least on guy who is trying to start his own moldmaking/casting service in the USA, he was a moldmaker/caster and sculptor for GW, but he's having trouble getting money together to buy equipment and space to work out of. Apartments tend to frown on heavy machinery in their units!

I'm sure he could do well enough so it can be a Full-Time job alongside his freelance sculpting.

Autumn Leaves
18-06-2015, 23:03
It's all digital at GW.
If he's not completely au fait with digital sculpting then it won't get beyond that issue.

selfconstrukt
19-06-2015, 18:53
It's all digital at GW.
If he's not completely au fait with digital sculpting then it won't get beyond that issue.

I've been told that as well, although I hear conflicting things about Forge World. Apparently they still use traditional sculptors but I've never seen an open job listing for Forge World.

I would assume the Forge World sculptors are part of the regular studio now anyway.

He is learning digital work, but I don't think his skills are good enough to market them yet.

It's a shame really. I always thought you would use whatever method you had at your disposal to make product. Going "all-digital" I'm sure has some advantages when it comes to manufacturing, nut those are usually more apparent when you outsource your manufacturing. GW does everything in-house.

I'm not sure I see the value of switching over completely, for them at least. You cut out a lot of good sculptors that way.

ebbwar
19-06-2015, 22:27
I've been told that as well, although I hear conflicting things about Forge World. Apparently they still use traditional sculptors but I've never seen an open job listing for Forge World.

I would assume the Forge World sculptors are part of the regular studio now anyway.

He is learning digital work, but I don't think his skills are good enough to market them yet.

It's a shame really. I always thought you would use whatever method you had at your disposal to make product. Going "all-digital" I'm sure has some advantages when it comes to manufacturing, nut those are usually more apparent when you outsource your manufacturing. GW does everything in-house.

I'm not sure I see the value of switching over completely, for them at least. You cut out a lot of good sculptors that way.

You are forgetting GW logic is not the same as rest of the world logic ;)

Voss
20-06-2015, 07:21
Also, keep in mind that the games industry (and moreso the wargames industry) is a very small pond (or rather a couple small ponds in different areas). Without connections* that actively want you at X company, you don't work for X company, period. At least not beyond shop minion or accounting clerk. Without someone in-house to nudge the HR people with 'Hey, pick that person, I know 'em, their work, and they'll fit in.' your buddy isn't going to get picked. There is a reason you can find out the names of most of the people who sculpt for wargames companies, and why it is a fairly short list.


*though admittedly sometimes this can be 'that time in the pub that I showed Jes Goodwin my portfolio, and he actually remembered me'

selfconstrukt
20-06-2015, 18:35
I totally agree Voss. I really hate cronyism and the time I spent working for wargames companies I've seen a lot of it.

Perfectly good staff wouldn't get hired simply because one person "didn't like them" or more frequently "Heard he was a jerk" or something to that effect.

Yes, you should be able to get along with other staff, but getting along has mutated into "Must be friends, buddies and bros". Maybe it's because we spend so much time at work.

I'm in HR at Microsoft and the number of times I have to deal with personality issues between staff is aggravating. We didn't hire you to like them and be friends, we hired you to do a damn job.

My friend does know someone at GW from way back, but hasn't spoken to him in ages. He doesn't feel comfortable asking people to do things for him, he said it inconveniences them and they don't owe him anything anyway.

I think he can be way too independent at times.

jinnai
22-06-2015, 09:39
It's actually a lot faster these days to digitally sculpt a model / toy and directly port the pieces onto a sprue for 3D printing and mold making, than the old manual method.

I know this from watching a friend of mine make 3P toys over the past year.

This would be why GW only hires digital sculptors now, and why certain sculptors got shifted over to FW.